TOP   ENGLISH GRADE NINE

2016-17 Academic Year

First Quarter   

Second Quarter

Third Quarter

Fourth Quarter

     

LLast Days of Classes Week Eight

     

Week Nine Finals and Make ups/(make ups)

Week One

Week One

Week One

Week One

Week Two

Week Two

Week Two

Week Two

Week Three

Week Three

Week Three

Week Three

Week Four

Week Four

Week Four

Week Four

Week Five

Week Five

Week Five

Week Five

Week Six

Week Six

Week Six

Week Six

Week Seven

Week Seven

Week Seven

Week Seven

Week Eight

Week Eight

Week Eight

 

Week Nine

Week Nine

 Week Nine

 

Week Ten

Week Ten

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week One

Monday

Labor Day  Quarter One  Week One

Tuesday

Sept 6

Welcome back to school

-- this is ENGLISH 9 --- 

a focus on question exploration, reading and annotation, speaking and writing.

1) Day one activities and "housekeeping."  Including a review of:   grading, work in class, participation, questions, you need a dedicated notebook for English, never leaving class with a question about an assignment, etc....
Pride in the Classroom & Rules
2) Complete getting to know you handout.  


3) Brainstorm 10 interview questions with open ended "follow ups" to use with a classmate.

      Concept--  What is a follow up question?

  

YES No (doesn't count) YES
ORIGINAL TOPIC QUESTION
ONE WORD ANSWER QUESTION
OPEN ENDED FOLLOW UP
EXAMPLE:
What was the last movie you saw?
   EXAMPLE
Did you like it?
EXAMPLE
Why did you like it?
   

  

What do you do in your spare time?  

 
They say something like...      I am a "gamer."    
Follow Up--    Oh, you are a gamer? 
or follow Up--   What are your favorite games right now? 
Then they are more detailed...  for example,  "I have been playing    TITANFALL  ELITE DANGEROUS ."   
Follow up-  What platform do you use? I primarily play on a PC with i5  with a solid state drive an NVIDIA GTX 950






LEARNING TOOLS (SAMPLE Click HERE)  & Study Guides and Strategies 


My Classroom Toolbox

Wednesday

 Sept 7

 

Today,

1) Complete getting to know you handout if not done and turn it in.
2) Brainstorm 10 interview questions with open ended "follow ups" to use with a classmate.
3) Use the interview questions you created to interview a student you do not know in class or are assigned to interview in order to present them to the class. 

4)Write an introduction in the form of a paragraph.  Be prepared to turn in your work Friday.

 

-For the possible grade of a "D" (7 out of 10), complete all written work and be on task neatly and on time.

-For the possible grade of a "C" (8 out of 10), complete all written work and be on task present the person from your seat.

-For the possible grade of a "B" (9 out of 10), also present the person to the class effectively from the front of the class.

-For the possible grade of a "A" (10 out of 10) do not mention their name until the end of your introduction.

 


Thursday

 Sept 8

 

 

Complete your interviews and be prepared to present Monday

Open ended questions, follow ups and answers collected at the end of class Friday.   You keep your introduction for use next week.

 

 

Friday   

           Sept. 9

 

TODAY-
     1 Complete work for your interview and introduction.
     2 Turn in your questions and answers.
     3 Keep your paragraph for next week.
     4 Be prepared to present Monday.


OPTIONAL ENRICHMENT (If you have completed all tasks so far)--

We are going to learn the skills to begin close reading and annotation.  Based on the following TED Talk, how many class periods of 30minutes will this skill take to learn?

The first 20 hours -- how to learn anything | Josh Kaufman|TEDxCSU

           

Be prepared to present Monday.

HW--  Complete any work not already completed and turn it in next week.

        Back to Top

 

 

 

Quarter One  Week Two

Monday

Sept 12

 Introduce your assigned classmate. Paragraphs are due with your introduction.

"I had the pleasure of interviewing a student in class and I want to share some things about them ...."

-For the possible grade of a "D" (7 out of 10), complete all written work and be on task neatly and on time.

-For the possible grade of a "C" (8 out of 10), complete all written work and be on task present the person from your seat.

-For the possible grade of a "B" (9 out of 10), also present the person to the class effectively from the front of the class.

-For the possible grade of a "A" (10 out of 10) do not mention their name until the end of your introduction.

 

Tuesday

Sept 13

Complete introductions at start of class.
Formative Assessment -- Literary Devices Worksheet.


S.M.A.R.T.
Goals Assignment

Smart Goals -- Create three S.M.A.R.T. 
goals for yourself

 --
first for this 
quartersecond for the yearand lastly for after graduation-- 

and explain how each of them are S.M.A.R.T. 

each letter represents a step in the process -- you should be able to share them with the class. 

You need to clearly explain how each letter is represented in each of your goals.  This should be completed by the end of class Thursday.

Wednesday

Sept 14

 
Pride in the Classroom & Rules


Ninth Grade Baseline Assessment ---
(if you are done early work on your S.M.A.R.T.  goals, Formative Assessment -- Literary Devices Worksheet, or something else) 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thursday

Sept 15


ENRICHMENT:

Tim Urban: Inside the mind of a master procrastinator

 

LINK HERE

 



S.M.A.R.T. Goals assignment have another person read your goals and check to see if you have explained how each letter is represented in your goals. This is collected for a grade Friday.


Friday

Sept 16

Pride in the Classroom & Rules
S.M.A.R.T.  Goals Poster --  Select one goal to create an 8x11 poster for display explaining why and how it is S.M.A.R.T. (explain for each letter and have your name on front)-- Due TODAY...Monday will be OK if you can't complete it neatly in class.


Formative Assessment -- Literary Devices Worksheet 
Check Your ANSWERS HERE and turn it in today.  MARK HOW MANY YOU GOT RIGHT NEXT TO YOUR NAME AND TURN IT IN.





ENRICHMENT:

Tim Urban: Inside the mind of a master procrastinator

 

LINK HERE

 

     Back to Top

 

 

Quarter One   Week Three

Monday

Sept 19

 
SMART Goals and "poster" are due at start of class.



PART OF LITERATURE CIRCLES IS WORKING IN CLASS


Beginning Oedipus / Literature Circles / Close Reading / Annotation.


Pride in the Classroom & Rules

Period 1 Google Classroom Mrs. Brown visit link HERE

Quantity does not measure learning:

Grades are based on quality!

To earn an "A"-- earn it every day.


Close Reading and Annotations   /  Literary Devices  /  Evidence Based Claims

NEW UNIT-- Unit Objectives: Students read the Greek tragedy Oedipus the King. The longest text in the Common Core module, it allows students to analyze how multiple central ideas are developed and refined throughout the drama; among the many themes developed in the play is Oedipus’s guilt in relation to the discovery of his past. Students will continue to produce multi-paragraph writing and participate in structured discussions to build mastery of speaking and listening skills in anticipation of the End-of-Unit Assessment in Unit 3, an evidence-based discussion of multiple nonfiction texts.

Sections assigned as we work in Literature Circles:
1 p1-17
2 18-37
3 38-58 up to line 990
4 59-67 up to line 1340
5 68-90


We begin to read together.   We stop and take notes as we progress.  Ask questions and research!

HW is assigned as needed.
Additional tools:




Tuesday

Sept 20

 
Work in Literature circles groups as assigned.

Pride in the Classroom & Rules

   The class will be split into groups of no more than 6 persons per group.  Changes to groups may be made at any time for the improvement of the educational experience and those changes are at the sole discretion of the teacher.

SUCCESS FOR 1ST QUARTER-- ( I know you can do it)!

Enter classroom and move into groups

Take out play and Literature Circles packet check group folder.

Work to learn and earn My Classroom Toolbox

QUALITY V.S. Quantity

Share with group and help

Last two minutes pack up and return desks to rows.

 


Begin a new unit with essential and supporting questions:  Oedipus the King

Each student gets a copy of the play.  Pages may be checked randomly for a grade.

We will begin our study with Literature Circles as our primary tool of research and study.

 

 

The Essential Question for this Unit:

What lessons does Sophocles include in his play Oedipus?

 

Supporting questions for focus assigned to groups for research:

Group 1 ---  What is Sophocles position on Power and Pride as revealed in his play Oedipus Rex?

Group 2 ---  What is Sophocles position on The Limits of Knowledge as revealed in his play Oedipus Rex?

Group 3---  What is Sophocles position on Fate vs. Free Will as revealed in his play Oedipus Rex?

Group 4---  What is Sophocles position on Human Suffering as revealed in his play Oedipus Rex?

Group 5---  What is Sophocles position on Moral Responsibility as revealed in his play Oedipus Rex?

Opportunities for enrichment  (advanced study) ---  see me

Oedipus Rex

A. the quest for identity

B. the nature of innocence and guilt

C. the nature of moral responsibility

D. the limitations of human will versus fate

E. the abuse of power

2. Vocabulary Development

unit in context

3. Literary Elements

A. theme

B. irony

1.dramatic

2. situational

3. verbal

C. characterization

D. flashback

E. foreshadowing

F. setting

G. conflict

1. internal

2. external

Wednesday

Sept 21

Pride in the Classroom & Rules
Complete first assigned section of play (pages 1-17) and your First Role as part of your group.  This must be shared with the group Next Tuesday.

SUCCESS FOR 1ST QUARTER-- ( I know you can do it)!

Enter classroom and move into groups

Take out play and Literature Circles packet check group folder.

Work to learn and earn  My Classroom Toolbox

QUALITY V.S. Quantity

Share with group and help

Last two minutes pack up and return desks to rows.

Opportunities for enrichment  (advanced study) ---  see me


Meet with your group and begin reading the first section Pages 1-17 of Oedipus 

COMPLETE BY END OF CLASS Monday 9 26 -- NOT DONE???  IT IS HOMEWORK.

TERMS TO KNOW  Day 1 Oedipus
Tragic Hero
Dramatic Irony
Characterization


My Classroom Toolbox



Sample How To Annotating Passages Oedipus the King

Thursday

Sept 22

 Complete first assigned section of play and your First Role as part of your group.  This must be shared with the group Friday.

SUCCESS FOR 1ST QUARTER-- ( I know you can do it)!

Enter classroom and move into groups

Take out play and Literature Circles packet check group folder.

Work to learn and earn My Classroom Toolbox

QUALITY V.S. Quantity

Share with group and help

Last two minutes pack up and return desks to rows.

Complete first assigned section of play (pages 1-17) and your First Role as part of your group.  This must be shared with the group Next Tuesday.

SUCCESS FOR 1ST QUARTER-- ( I know you can do it)!

Enter classroom and move into groups

Take out play and Literature Circles packet check group folder.

Work to learn and earn  My Classroom Toolbox

QUALITY V.S. Quantity

Share with group and help

Last two minutes pack up and return desks to rows.

Opportunities for enrichment  (advanced study) ---  see me


Meet with your group and begin reading the first section Pages 1-17 of Oedipus 

COMPLETE BY END OF CLASS Monday 9 26 -- NOT DONE???  IT IS HOMEWORK.

TERMS TO KNOW  Day 1 Oedipus
Tragic Hero
Dramatic Irony
Characterization

 

Friday

Sept 23




Fate, Family, and Oedipus Rex: Crash Course Literature 202 (14 minutes)



Complete first assigned section of play (pages 1-17) and your First Role as part of your group.  This must be shared with the group Next Tuesday.

SUCCESS FOR 1ST QUARTER-- ( I know you can do it)!

Enter classroom and move into groups

Take out play and Literature Circles packet check group folder.

Work to learn and earn  My Classroom Toolbox

QUALITY V.S. Quantity

Share with group and help

Last two minutes pack up and return desks to rows.

Opportunities for enrichment  (advanced study) ---  see me


Meet with your group and begin reading the first section Pages 1-17 of Oedipus 

COMPLETE BY END OF CLASS Monday 9 26 -- NOT DONE???  IT IS HOMEWORK.

TERMS TO KNOW  Day 1 Oedipus
Tragic Hero
Dramatic Irony
Characterization


My Classroom Toolbox


Sample How To Annotating Passages Oedipus the King

Opportunities for enrichment  (advanced study) ---  see me


AP Oedipus Rex

  Week Three     Back to Top

 

 

 

Week Four

Monday Quarter One

Sept 26

 Complete first assigned section of play (pages 1-17) and your First Role as part of your group.  This must be shared with the group Tuesday.

SUCCESS FOR 1ST QUARTER-- ( I know you can do it)!

Enter classroom and move into groups

Take out play and Literature Circles packet check group folder.

Work to learn and earn  My Classroom Toolbox

QUALITY V.S. Quantity

Share with group and help

Last two minutes pack up and return desks to rows.

Opportunities for enrichment  (advanced study) ---  see me


Meet with your group and begin reading the first section Pages 1-17 of Oedipus 

COMPLETE BY END OF CLASS Monday 9 26 -- NOT DONE???  IT IS HOMEWORK.

TERMS TO KNOW  Day 1 Oedipus
Tragic Hero
Dramatic Irony
Characterization


Complete Share Sheet.  Assign new roles for group members and begin the next section of Oedipus assigned.




Tuesday

Sept 27

 
Turn in assessment on pages 1-17.
Begin Share Sheet LINK.  Follow directions exactly for full credit. 
Use sentences.

Assign new roles for group members and begin the next section of Oedipus assigned Section 2 pages 18 through 37. Work in literature circles groups on the second role assigned.








Wednesday

Sept 28


Complete and turn in Share Sheet LINK.  Follow directions exactly for full credit. 

Use sentences.

Use new roles for group members and continue on the next section of Oedipus assigned Section 2 pages 18 through 37. Work in literature circles groups on the second role assigned.

REMINDERS:




SECTIONS FOR OEDIPUS

1 p1-17  DONE ALL WORK COMPLETED AS OF TODAY
2 18-37
3 38-58 up to line 990
4 59-67 up to line 1340
5 68-90

Literature Circle Roles HERE

TEXTS:

Oedipus the King






Faculty Meeting &
 Parent/Teacher Night (parent follows student schedules for a brief introduction and overview).


The Essential Question for this Unit:

What lessons does Sophocles include in his play Oedipus?

 

Supporting questions for focus assigned to groups for research:

Group 1 ---  What is Sophocles position on Power and Pride as revealed in his play Oedipus Rex?

Group 2 ---  What is Sophocles position on The Limits of Knowledge as revealed in his play Oedipus Rex?

Group 3---  What is Sophocles position on Fate vs. Free Will as revealed in his play Oedipus Rex?

Group 4---  What is Sophocles position on Human Suffering as revealed in his play Oedipus Rex?

Group 5---  What is Sophocles position on Moral Responsibility as revealed in his play Oedipus Rex?

Opportunities for enrichment  (advanced study) ---  see me



Sample How To Annotating Passages Oedipus the King

Thursday

Sept 29

Charles Rutenberg Anniversary Event

Oedipus the King           QUESTIONS HERE  Help Here



Follow directions exactly for full credit.  Use sentences.


Use new roles for group members and continue on the next section of Oedipus assigned Section 2 pages 18 through 37. Work in literature circles groups on the second role assigned to share on Friday.
Friday

Sept 30

Oedipus the King           QUESTIONS HERE  Help Here




ENRICHMENT:
BBC Ancient Greece The Greatest Show on Earth - A look at how drama in Athens was deeply connected to Athenian democracy. HERE

Let the theatre challenge those in power | Tess Berry-Hart | TEDxSouthamptonUniversity  HERE

Julie Taymor: Spider-Man, The Lion King and life on the creative edge  HERE




 Section 2 pages 18 through 37... due at end of class Thursday October 6.  Work in literature circles groups if you are done Third Role.


As long as you have completed and turned in lit circles roles for 1-17 and owe no work you have no HW.

 Week Four    Back to Top

 

 

 

 

Week Five

Monday

Oct  3

Rosh Hashanah School Closed

Tuesday

Oct  4

Rosh Hashanah School Closed

Wednesday

Oct  5

Quarter One 

 Faculty Meeting
Oedipus the King           ENRICHMENT STUDY QUESTIONS HERE  Help Here

Use new roles for group members and continue on the previous section of Oedipus the King  assigned
Section 2 pages 18 through 37.


Work in literature circles groups --- Grade given for second role assigned to share on Thursday October 6 (tomorrow).


Thursday
Oct. 6
Share Sheet LINK for Section 2 pages 18 through 37... due at end of class Friday October 10 / 11.  Work in literature circles groups if you are done Third Role(Section 3 pages 38-58 up to line 990)




What Am I? - An English Riddle

Friday

Oct  7

Share Sheet LINK for Section 2 pages 18 through 37... due at end of class Tuesday October .  Work in literature circles groups if you are done Third Role(Section 3 pages 38-58 up to line 990)


STILL CONFUSED?
"Oedipus Rex" | Overview & Summary Analysis | 60second Recap®  HERE


Enrichment:
Dramatic Irony
Back to the Future - Awkward Scene (Marty and Lorraine) Here 3min


"Oedipus Rex Rap (The Best Way to Learn the Story)" HERE  3min

Oedipus the King & Star Wars
edition  HERE  4min 30sec
 PREZI Version!  HERE  and 

Star Wars and Oedipus PREZI Here

and here...

 











SECTIONS FOR OEDIPUS
1 p1-17 & 2 18-37  DONE ALL WORK COMPLETED AS OF TODAY 

NOW WORKING ON SECTION 3 38-58 up to line 990 If you are absent
4 59-67 up to line 1340
5 68-90

Week Five     Back to Top

 

 

 

 

Week Six

Monday

Oct  10

 Columbus Day  School Closed

Tuesday

Oct  11

Share Sheet LINK for Section 2 pages 18 through 37... due at end of class.  Work in literature circles groups if you are done complete your choice of word search or crossword puzzle.


STILL CONFUSED?
"Oedipus Rex" | Overview & Summary Analysis | 60second Recap®  HERE


Enrichment:
Dramatic Irony
Back to the Future - Awkward Scene (Marty and Lorraine) Here 3min

"Oedipus Rex Rap (The Best Way to Learn the Story)" HERE  3min
Oedipus the King & Star Wars
edition  HERE  4min 30sec
 

SECTIONS FOR OEDIPUS
1 p1-17 & 2 18-37  DONE ALL WORK COMPLETED AS OF TODAY 

NOW WORKING ON SECTION



3 38-58 up to line 990 If you are absent
4 59-67 up to line 1340
5 68-90

Wednesday

Oct  12

 Yom Kippur   School Closed

Thursday

Oct  13

 Third Role(Section 3 pages 38-58 up to line 990) for Tuesday

DUE 10 / 18





Friday

Oct  14

 Third Role(Section 3 pages 38-58 up to line 990) for Tuesday

DUE 10 / 18   Homecoming 2016 on Friday, October 14.  Go Lions!  
Pride /  Spirit /  Heart  --


in all of life not.... only for the game!



homecoming


hsteacher        10011953

3) Click studio-to-go (you will not see this until the camera is live......please be patient) 


All you gamers...happy  Battlefield 1 Preload Day :)  1pm! LOL

Quarter One  Week Six     Back to Top

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monday

Oct  17

Week Seven Quarter One


Third Role
(Section 3 pages 38-58 up to line 990) for Tuesday 10 / 18



 

Tuesday

Oct  18

SHARE SHEET 3 is Due 
LITERATURE CIRCLES PACKET is DUE with FOUR completed worksheets on Friday October 28.
All you gamers...happy  Battlefield 1 playable Day :)

Wednesday

Oct  19

 Testing and Service 1/2 day

Thursday

Oct  20

 

Oedipus Group Assessment Options due Next Thursday October 27-- Failure to be able to be part of a group may result in an alternative assessment assignment.  CLICK HERE

Classroom Toolbox

 

Need help?  

 LitCharts     HERE  

AND Shmoop - We Speak Student  HERE

Use group folder for all materials that are to be worked on or shared.

Groups of no fewer than four no greater than six. 

Quality as well as the ability to work in class are part of each person's grade.

Teachers may make changes to groups as needed and if needed.

Not being able to work in a group or follow directions may result in an independent assignment.

 

Friday

Oct  21

 GREAT JOB SO FAR!  NOW MOVE INTO YOUR GROUPS AND BEGIN WORK ON YOUR ASSESSMENT DUE THURSDAY 10 / 27 / 2016

Oedipus Group Assessment Options due Thursday October 27-- Failure to be able to be part of a group may result in an alternative assessment assignment.  CLICK HERE

Classroom Toolbox

 

Need help?   LitCharts       HERE  

AND Shmoop - We Speak Student  HERE

Use group folder for all materials that are to be worked on or shared.

Groups of no fewer than four no greater than six. 

Quality as well as the ability to work in class are part of each person's grade.

Teachers may make changes to groups as needed and if needed.

Not being able to work in a group or follow directions may result in an independent assignment.

 

  Week Seven     Back to Top

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week Eight

Monday

Oct  24

Quarter One 

Week Eight 

 Hey Gamers... Titanfall 2 Preload Release Date :)


MOVE INTO YOUR GROUPS AND BEGIN WORK ON YOUR ASSESSMENT DUE THURSDAY 10 / 27 / 2016

Alternative assessment assignment.  CLICK HERE you must work on this in class.

Classroom Toolbox

Nine days Remain in the first quarter.  All late work is due at the start of class on OCTOBER 31 (next Monday).

Need help?    LitCharts    HERE  

AND Shmoop - We Speak Student  HERE

Use group folder for all materials that are to be worked on or shared.

Groups of no fewer than four no greater than six. 

Quality as well as the ability to work in class are part of each person's grade.

Teachers may make changes to groups as needed and if needed.

Not being able to work in a group or follow directions may result in an independent assignment to be worked on in class.

Alternative assessment assignment.  CLICK HERE you must work on this in class.

 

Tuesday

Oct  25

 

Need help?    LitCharts    HERE  

AND Shmoop - We Speak Student  HERE

Use group folder for all materials that are to be worked on or shared.

Groups of no fewer than four no greater than six. 

Quality as well as the ability to work in class are part of each person's grade.

Teachers may make changes to groups as needed and if needed.

Not being able to work in a group or follow directions may result in an independent assignment to be worked on in class.

Alternative assessment assignment.  CLICK HERE you must work on this in class.

All late work is due at the start of class on OCTOBER 31 (next Monday).

Wednesday

Oct  26

 

Oedipus Group Assessment Options due tomorrow Thursday October 27-- CLICK HERE

Classroom Toolbox  

 

Need help?    LitCharts    HERE  

AND Shmoop - We Speak Student  HERE

Use group folder for all materials that are to be worked on or shared.

Groups of no fewer than four no greater than six. 

Quality as well as the ability to work in class are part of each person's grade.

Teachers may make changes to groups as needed and if needed.

Not being able to work in a group or follow directions may result in an independent assignment.

 

All late work is due at the start of class on OCTOBER 31 (next Monday).

Thursday

Oct  27

 GROUP ASSESSMENT PRESENTATIONS DUE Friday!!!!
Done? 

Complete
LITERATURE CIRCLES PACKET DUE with FOUR completed worksheets!

Friday

Oct  28

 

GROUP ASSESSMENT PRESENTATIONS
LITERATURE CIRCLES PACKET is DUE with FOUR completed worksheets on Friday October 28... bring this with you on Monday you may use it as notes for the final assessment of Oedipus.


HW All late work is due at the start of class on OCTOBER 31 (next Monday).

   Back to Top

 

 

 

 

Week Nine

Monday

Oct  31

 Nine days Remain in the first quarter.  All late work is due at the start of class.


IN CLASS FINAL "End-of-Unit Assessment"  on Oedipus is  HERE 
Happy Halloween!



Tuesday

Nov 1


NINTH GRADE FIRST QUARTER BENCHMARK EXAM  be on time and bring a #2 pencil please.
 

Wednesday

Nov 2

Faculty Meeting


Oedipus Group Presentations / Alternative Assessment  Quarter One  Week Nine 





1) State the question specific for your group.
2) Present the option you have put together for your presentation.
3) Be prepared to read the paragraphs as summation if asked.
4) Return all materials to me in your group folder.





NOTES


 
Begin New Unit:  Short Stories -- Fiction and non fiction with annotation. Additionally, we are close reading and learning vocabulary from context. This foundation is one they will build upon throughout the year, so its introduction here is critical. Students will be introduced to the purposes of close reading and will begin learning to read closely as they examine an excerpt from Karen Russell’s short story, “St. Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised by Wolves.” 

The Essential Question for this unit:

What does it mean to be a human being?

Supporting Questions:

  1. What does it mean to be an outsider?
  2. What is a dominant culture?
  3. Is it easier for some people to fit in to the dominant society than others? Why?
  4. Is fitting into the dominant society desirable? Why/ why not?
  5. What common themes unify the experience of being an outsider?
  6. How do we respond to forced assimilation?
  7. Does the way we react shape who we are? How?









Thursday

Nov 3

 

How to Succeed in English:

Try your best to be nice to others.
Be on time or have a pass.
Work when, where, and how you are asked.
See me or a counselor with any questions, problems, or conflicts ASAP
You are responsible to have worksheets and texts with you every day and not to lose them. 
Come prepared ready to work with a writing instrument that doesn't require to be sharpened. 
You are expected to not make noise when the teacher is giving instruction.  There is plenty of time for you to talk in class as I do not lecture for 40minutes... or even 20... rarely 10. 
There is no eating in class, this is not the "Mr. Galanaugh Show." 
There is no sleeping in class. 
You are required to write legibly. 
If you must, you may rewrite any assignment at home and turn it in at the start of class the next day. 
You are expected to work with all of the members of the class as part of practicing positive communication skills.
If you have a problem / question see me first and we will work something out. 
You are not allowed to leave the class with a question unanswered about the work we are doing.  Expect to be challenged. 
Quality and completeness of work makes your grade. 
Additional assignments will be provided for enrichment if you are done early, expect to work bell to bell.






 
Begin New Unit:  Short Stories -- Fiction and non fiction with annotation. Additionally, we are close reading and learning vocabulary from context. This foundation is one they will build upon throughout the year, so its introduction here is critical. Students will be introduced to the purposes of close reading and will begin learning to read closely as they examine an excerpt from Karen Russell’s short story, “St. Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised by Wolves.” 

The Essential Question for this unit:

What does it mean to be a human being?

Supporting Questions:

  1. What does it mean to be an outsider?
  2. What is a dominant culture?
  3. Is it easier for some people to fit in to the dominant society than others? Why?
  4. Is fitting into the dominant society desirable? Why/ why not?
  5. What common themes unify the experience of being an outsider?
  6. How do we respond to forced assimilation?
  7. Does the way we react shape who we are? How?


In order to answer these questions we will rely on a variety of sources and follow along with the
Question Exploration Routine




The Island of Dr. Moreau
 By H.G. Wells Text  Here

View excerpts of film and take notes on the worksheet provided.

If you are absent you may cut and paste the assignment below:

Name____________________________

As you view excerpts of The Island of Dr. Moreau, complete the following by providing specific evidence for each of the following topics for a writing assignment.

Select any three of the following characters and take notes with evidence from the media:  Dr. Moreau / Montgomery / Hyena-Swine / Dog Man (and the pack) / Sayer of the Law / Leopard Man / Edward Douglas / Aissa / M'ling      

Character:

Topic Central Idea

Evidence

Topic

Evidence

Food Types and Hunger

 

 

Violence and Peace

 

Alcohol and Drugs

 

 

Beast Like

 

 

 

Looks and Appearance

 

 

Social Status and Rights

 

Rules and Chaos

 

 

 

 

Protagonist

 

 

Beliefs and Religion

 

 

Antagonist

 

Science and Education

 

 

Civilized or Primitive

 

Compassion and Feelings

 

 

 

Morals

 

Based on my evidence this character is more like a __________________________________(Human or Beast) because:

1

2

3

 

 

 

 

 

Friday

Nov 4

 The Essential Question for this unit:

What does it mean to be a human being?

Supporting Questions:

  1. What does it mean to be an outsider?
  2. What is a dominant culture?
  3. Is it easier for some people to fit in to the dominant society than others? Why?
  4. Is fitting into the dominant society desirable? Why/ why not?
  5. What common themes unify the experience of being an outsider?
  6. How do we respond to forced assimilation?
  7. Does the way we react shape who we are? How?



The Island of Dr. Moreau By H.G. Wells Text Here  Screenplay here

View excerpts of film and take notes on the worksheet provided.

   Back to Top

 

 

 

 

Week Ten

Monday

Nov 7

 
The Essential Question for this unit:

What does it mean to be a human being?

Supporting Questions:

  1. What does it mean to be an outsider?
  2. What is a dominant culture?
  3. Is it easier for some people to fit in to the dominant society than others? Why?
  4. Is fitting into the dominant society desirable? Why/ why not?
  5. What common themes unify the experience of being an outsider?
  6. How do we respond to forced assimilation?
  7. Does the way we react shape who we are? How?



The Island of Dr. Moreau By H.G. Wells Text Here  Screenplay here

View excerpts of film and take notes on the worksheet provided.

Tuesday

Nov 8


VOTE! Superintendent's Conference 1/2 day.

Period 1, 2, 3, & 9 Meet  Complete Worksheet on The Island of Dr. Moreau

Enrichment  ---  TED TALK  HERE  Summary / Response Activity

Write a paragraph summarizing the talk and a paragraph responding to a specific point made by the presenter.  TED TALK  HERE

What happens when two monkeys are paid unequally? Fairness, reciprocity, empathy, cooperation — caring about the well-being of others seems like a very human trait. But Frans de Waal shares some surprising videos of behavioral tests, on primates and other mammals, that show how many of these moral traits all of us share.




Half-Day

Wednesday

Nov9

 
Create a creature and narrative description based on the worksheet distributed in class.  Due by the end of Friday.














Thursday

Nov 10

 Marking Period Ends

Create a creature and narrative description based on the worksheet distributed in class.  Due by the end of Friday.

Welcome to the Genomic Revolution
Cheap and fast genome sequencing is about to turn health care (and insurance, and politics) upside down. Richard Resnick shows how, in this accessible talk.   HERE 11 MIN



Will our kids be a different species?
Throughout human evolution, multiple versions of humans co-existed. Could we be mid-upgrade now? Juan Enriquez sweeps across time and space to bring us to the present moment — and shows how technology is revealing evidence that suggests rapid evolution may be under way.


HERE  17MIN


Friday

Nov 11

Veteran's Day School Closed

Quarter One  Week Ten     Back to Top

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week One

Monday

Nov 14

Quarter Two  Week One 

 
How to Succeed in English:

Try your best to be nice to others.
Be on time or have a pass.
Work when, where, and how you are asked.
See me or a counselor with any questions, problems, or conflicts ASAP
You are responsible to have worksheets and texts with you every day and not to lose them. 
Come prepared ready to work with a writing instrument that doesn't require to be sharpened. 
You are expected to not make noise when the teacher is giving instruction.  There is plenty of time for you to talk in class as I do not lecture for 40minutes... or even 20... rarely 10. 
There is no eating in class, this is not the "Mr. Galanaugh Show." 
There is no sleeping in class. 
You are required to write legibly. 
If you must, you may rewrite any assignment at home and turn it in at the start of class the next day. 
You are expected to work with all of the members of the class as part of practicing positive communication skills.
If you have a problem / question see me first and we will work something out. 
You are not allowed to leave the class with a question unanswered about the work we are doing.  Expect to be challenged. 
Quality and completeness of work makes your grade. 
Additional assignments will be provided for enrichment if you are done early, expect to work bell to bell.





Continue Unit:  Short Stories -- Fiction and non fiction with annotation. Additionally, we are close reading and learning vocabulary from context. This foundation is one they will build upon throughout the year, so its introduction here is critical.


Students will be introduced to the purposes of close reading and will begin learning to read closely as they examine an excerpt from Karen Russell’s short story, “
St. Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised by Wolves.” 

The Essential Question for this unit:

What does it mean to be a human being?

Supporting Questions:

  1. What does it mean to be an outsider?
  2. What is a dominant culture?
  3. Is it easier for some people to fit in to the dominant society than others? Why?
  4. Is fitting into the dominant society desirable? Why/ why not?
  5. What common themes unify the experience of being an outsider?
  6. How do we respond to forced assimilation?
  7. Does the way we react shape who we are? How?


PART I and STUDY QUESTIONS as assigned.

Karen Russell’s short story, “St. Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised by Wolves” 
Continue Close Reading-- be prepared to turn in your annotations and for additional assessment.


Besides being prepared for the vocabulary...

Focus on questioning the text and predicting based on your questions.

Identify Literary Devices the author is using:
Metaphor
Imagery
Characterization
P.O.V. (POINT OF VIEW)
Irony


In order to answer these questions we will rely on a variety of sources and follow along with the Question Exploration Routine  while we do close reading and answer study questions.

You select to work in pairs or alone.  Close reading is a skill that is not mastered working in large groups copying the answers.  Copying will result in a lowered grade.


Tuesday

Nov 15

PART I and STUDY QUESTIONS
Karen Russell’s short story, “St. Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised by Wolves” 
Continue Close Reading-- be prepared to turn in your annotations and for additional assessment.

Tools:
Google
Dictionary

What is Annotating Text?  Look Here:   Annotating Text   (go to settings- translate captions- options and select the language you wish)    
Continue to work on the reading guide.

What is close reading?  Look Here:   How to do a Close Reading (go to settings- translate captions- options and select the language you wish)
What kind of Language Arts Terms:  HERE




Below is a word document of the text we are annotating:

COPY OF TEXT FOR ANNOTATION 


Sample assignment for a college level Annotated Text at Genius


You select to work in pairs or alone.  Close reading is a skill that is not mastered working in large groups copying the answers.  Copying will result in a lowered grade.
 
 

Wednesday

Nov 16

 Library Orientation Assignment and Assessment meet in class then go to Library.

Thursday

Nov 17

 Library Orientation Assignment and Assessment meet in class then go to Library.

Friday

Nov 18

 PART I and STUDY QUESTIONS
Karen Russell’s short story, “St. Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised by Wolves” 
Continue Close Reading-- be prepared to turn in your annotations and for additional assessment.

You select to work in pairs or alone.  Close reading is a skill that is not mastered working in large groups copying the answers.  Copying will result in a lowered grade.

   Back to Top

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week Two

Monday

Nov 21

 View "Wild Child" and write three facts about children raised without human contact according to the video and answer the following questions:

Video HERE

1 What are feral children?
2 Why are Sociologists and Psychologists so interested in feral children?
3 What behavior makes a child human?
4 Summarize the case study of Oxana
5 Summarize the case study of Victor
6 Summarize the case study of Genie
7 Summarize the case study of Edik
8 What is the most important influence on a child's development??



Tuesday

Nov 22

 View "Wild Child" and write three facts about children raised without human contact according to the video and answer the following questions:

Video HERE

1 What are feral children?
2 Why are Sociologists and Psychologists so interested in feral children?
3 According to the video, what behavior makes a child human?
4 Summarize the case study of Oxana
5 Summarize the case study of Victor
6 Summarize the case study of Genie
7 Summarize the case study of Edik
8 According to the video, what is the most important influence on a child's development??







Wednesday

Nov 19

 Thanksgiving Recess School Closed

Thursday

Nov 20

 Thanksgiving Recess School Closed

Friday

Nov 21

 Thanksgiving Recess School Closed

Quarter Two  Week Two     Back to Top

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week Three

Monday

Nov 28

Quarter Two  Week Three  

 

Point of View, Perspective, Audience, and Voice  
Additional Notes / Worksheets Here  


"Little Red Riding Hood" & the wolf's perspective assignment due Wednesday:






Work alone or with a partner to retell "Little Red Riding Hood" from the another perspective... the wolf's. Do this in each of the three points of view-- keep it simple.   (LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD - PLOT : The story revolves around a girl called Little Red Riding Hood. In the Grimms' and Perrault's versions of the tale, she is named after the red hooded cape/cloak that she wears. forgets not to talk to strangers... A "Big Bad Wolf" wants to eat the girl and the food in the basket...)



Simply put, perspective is who tells the story, and point of view is how they tell it. Perspective is like taking sides in an argument... where you can understand and sympathize with one side over another.


Different Types Of Point Of View

First Person Point Of View: First person is used when the main character is telling the story. This is the kind that uses the "I" narrator. As a reader, you can only experience the story through this person's eyes. So you won't know anything about the people or events that this character hasn't personally experienced. First Person Peripheral: This is when the narrator is a supporting character in the story, not the main character. It still uses the "I" narrator but since the narrator is not the protagonist, there are events and scenes that will happen to the protagonist that the narrator will not have access to. 

Second Person Point Of View: Second person point of view is generally only used in instructional writing. It is told from the perspective of "you". 

Third Person Point Of View: Third person POV is used when your narrator is not a character in the story. Third person uses the "he/she/it" narrator and it is the most commonly used POV in writing. 
There are 3 main types of Third Person POV: 

Third Person Limited: Limited means that the POV is limited to only one character. Which means that the narrator only knows what that character knows. With third person limited you can choose to view the action from right inside the character's head, or from further away, where the narrator has more access to information outside the protagonist's viewpoint. 
Third Person Multiple: This type is still in the "he/she/it" category, but now the narrator can follow multiple characters in the story. The challenge is making sure that the reader knows when you are switching from one character to another. Make the switch obvious with chapter or section breaks. 
Third Person Omniscient: This point of view still uses the "he/she/it" narration but now the narrator knows EVERYTHING. The narrator isn't limited by what one character knows, sort of like the narrator is God. The narrator can know things that others don't, can make comments about what's happening, and can see inside the minds of other characters. 


Complete the following for THURSDAY:

Complete the first section of close reading and annotation using  St. Lucy's Home for Girls Raised by Wolves written by Karen Russell by Thursday.  Close Reading and Annotations   /  Literary Devices

Besides being prepared for the vocabulary, complete the first section of close reading and annotation where you focus on questioning the text and predicting based on your questions. 


As part of this weighted 3X quiz grade you must be able to show me examples of Literary Devices the author is using that you have identified in the text:


Personification

Conflict

 

 

Classroom Toolbox

 


Tuesday

Nov 29

 
"Little Red Riding Hood" & The Wolf's Perspective
assignment due at start of tomorrow.

Different Types Of Point Of View

First Person Point Of View: First person is used when the main character is telling the story. This is the kind that uses the "I" narrator. As a reader, you can only experience the story through this person's eyes. So you won't know anything about the people or events that this character hasn't personally experienced. First Person Peripheral: This is when the narrator is a supporting character in the story, not the main character. It still uses the "I" narrator but since the narrator is not the protagonist, there are events and scenes that will happen to the protagonist that the narrator will not have access to. 

Second Person Point Of View: Second person point of view is generally only used in instructional writing. It is told from the perspective of "you". 

Third Person Point Of View: Third person POV is used when your narrator is not a character in the story. Third person uses the "he/she/it" narrator and it is the most commonly used POV in writing. 
There are 3 main types of Third Person POV: 

Third Person Limited: Limited means that the POV is limited to only one character. Which means that the narrator only knows what that character knows. With third person limited you can choose to view the action from right inside the character's head, or from further away, where the narrator has more access to information outside the protagonist's viewpoint. 
Third Person Multiple: This type is still in the "he/she/it" category, but now the narrator can follow multiple characters in the story. The challenge is making sure that the reader knows when you are switching from one character to another. Make the switch obvious with chapter or section breaks. 
Third Person Omniscient: This point of view still uses the "he/she/it" narration but now the narrator knows EVERYTHING. The narrator isn't limited by what one character knows, sort of like the narrator is God. The narrator can know things that others don't, can make comments about what's happening, and can see inside the minds of other characters. 






Self-Reflection Due by the end of class.  Distributed in class.


Answer the following questions (the first five in complete sentences) on your own-- duplicate answers will literally receive no credit:

1) What is your favorite part of this unit on what it means to be a human being?
2) What other topics would you like to learn about or explore in order to become an authority in discussing questions on the unit we are exploring?
3) What is the hardest part about this unit/topic/question for you?
4) How would you rate the quality of your personal learning behaviors and effort as you consider their impact on our use of time?
5) Is there anything else your teacher do in the classroom to better support your effort to learn?
You may answer the following topics without sentences:
6) Based on the media we have explored so far, could you explain justify a difference between literature and science when it comes to answering the essential question using details and facts?
7) How would you rate the difficulty of the work you have done so far (
One is no challenge, Ten is too difficult) ?
*Consider the activities you have worked upon: science exploration / literature & media / facts and evidence / annotation and close reading / reflection and fun / group and individual work / presentations / assessment variety

Creativity           1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10 
Scholarship        1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10 
Questioning       1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10 
Answering         1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10 
Exploring           1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10 
Expectations      1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10 
Homework         1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10 














The Essential Question for this unit:

What does it mean to be a human being?

Supporting Questions:

  1. What does it mean to be an outsider?
  2. What is a dominant culture?
  3. Is it easier for some people to fit in to the dominant society than others? Why?
  4. Is fitting into the dominant society desirable? Why/ why not?
  5. What common themes unify the experience of being an outsider?
  6. How do we respond to forced assimilation?
  7. Does the way we react shape who we are? How?

Complete the first section of close reading and annotation using  St. Lucy's Home for Girls Raised by Wolves written by Karen Russell by Thursday.  Close Reading and Annotations   /  Literary Devices

Besides being prepared for the vocabulary, complete the first section of close reading and annotation where you focus on questioning the text and predicting based on your questions. 


As part of this weighted 3X quiz grade you must be able to show me examples of Literary Devices the author is using that you have identified in the text:


Personification

Conflict

 

HOMEWORK if not completed in class-- prepare for assessment Thursday-- bring copy of text and study questions.

 

Classroom Toolbox

 

 

Wednesday

Nov 30



"Little Red Riding Hood" & The Wolf's Perspective
assignment due at start of class.

Complete the first section of close reading and annotation using  St. Lucy's Home for Girls Raised by Wolves written by Karen Russell by Thursday.  Close Reading and Annotations   /  Literary Devices

Besides being prepared for the vocabulary, complete the first section of close reading and annotation where you focus on questioning the text and predicting based on your questions.  Highlight your annotations as directed in class. 

 


As part of this weighted 3X quiz grade you must be able to show me examples of Literary Devices the author is using that you have identified in the text:

Personification

Conflict



HOMEWORK if not completed in class-- prepare for assessment Thursday-- bring copy of text with annotations and study questions.
Classroom Toolbox



Thursday

Dec 1


 

DID YOU MISS THE TEST THURSDAY?

Alternative assessment if you missed the in class test.  Due your first day back to class.  CLICK HERE



FOR ASSESSMENT today, Thursday,  be sure you have completed the first section of close reading and annotation using  St. Lucy's Home for Girls Raised by Wolves written by Karen Russell by Friday.

Besides being prepared for the vocabulary, complete the first section of close reading and annotation where you focus on questioning the text and predicting based on your questions.   Close Reading and Annotations   /  Literary Devices

As part of this weighted 3X quiz grade you must be able to show me examples of Literary Devices the author is using that you have identified in the text:


Personification

Conflict

DID YOU MISS THE TEST THURSDAY?

Alternative assessment if you missed the in class test.  Due your first day back to class.  CLICK HERE





Friday

Dec 2



 

DID YOU MISS THE TEST THURSDAY?

Alternative assessment if you missed the in class test.  Due your first day back to class.  CLICK HERE


 

What does it mean to be a human being?


Media we will view / read in part or whole:
Tarzan of the Apes, by Edgar Rice Burroughs
Adapted to film in 

Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes

Film version was available HERE

		

		

		

Click on image for script. 


What is a literary elements or devices?  These are tools an author uses to create specific effects on the audience/reader both emotionally and intellectually.

What is Academic Vocabulary? Vocabulary that is frequently used in the process of advanced thinking skills found frequently in schools and universities as well in Phineas and Ferb but less so in SpongeBob.

A recent study Led by University of Virginia psychologist Angeline Lillard, researchers randomly assigned 60 four-year-olds to view  fast paced television shows (specifically Sponge Bob in this instance) it was  found that (from watching it), a toddlers attention was temporarily delayed and they performed more poorly than the kids that didn't watch it. They don't know what lasting effects are... Many parents don’t allow their children to watch SpongeBob or any shows like it. – ABC News 9/12 /2011

 

Literary Devices and Academic Vocabulary Word Bank:

Personification is when you give human qualities to an object or animal. Authors use it to add interest or understanding to a poem or story though comparison or contrast.

 

Conflict can be put into several types: the “Big Four” types of literary conflict:

Man vs. Man / Man vs. Nature / Man vs. Society / Man vs. Self

Nature: the phenomena of the physical world collectively, including plants, animals, the landscape, and other features and products of the earth, as opposed to humans or human creations.

Society: people in general thought of as living together in organized communities with shared laws, traditions, and values.

Protagonist: the leading character or one of the major characters in a drama, movie, novel, or other fictional text.

Versus: as opposed to; in contrast to "weighing the pros and cons of graduation versus dropping out and earning less" abbreviated with the following  v., vs.

 

There are many specific and detailed examples (evidence) of conflict in this text / media. Identify an example for each of the following:

Man vs. Man     _____________________________               versus  _____________________________

Man vs. Nature _____________________________              v              _____________________________

Man vs. Society _____________________________             vs           _____________________________

Man vs. Self      _____________________________               versus  _____________________________

  

In order to have details for a written response you will keep notes in the form of a Venn diagram below. 

You will contrast the behavior of the Apes and Humans as you work to identify a central idea about civilized and uncivilized behavior for the topics in the central column:

 

Unique to Apes

Similar

Unique to Humans

 

 

 

Character

 

 

 

 

 

 

Society

 

 

 

 

 

Conflict

 

 

 

 

 

Communication

 

 

 

 

 

Thinking

 

 

 

 

 

Feeling

 

 

 

 

 

Morals

 

Based on the evidence above I claim that the central idea about civilized and uncivilized behavior in this text by Edgar Rice Burroughs can be stated as:

 

 

 

 

  Back to Top

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week Four

Monday

Dec 5

 
The Essential Question for this unit:

What does it mean to be a human being?

Supporting Questions:

  1. What does it mean to be an outsider?
  2. What is a dominant culture?
  3. Is it easier for some people to fit in to the dominant society than others? Why?
  4. Is fitting into the dominant society desirable? Why/ why not?
  5. What common themes unify the experience of being an outsider?
  6. How do we respond to forced assimilation?
  7. Does the way we react shape who we are? How?

Media we will view / read in part or whole:
Tarzan of the Apes, by Edgar Rice Burroughs
Adapted to film in 

Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes

Film version was avaliable HERE
 


What is a literary elements or devices?  These are tools an author uses to create specific effects on the audience/reader both emotionally and intellectually.

What is Academic Vocabulary? Vocabulary that is frequently used in the process of advanced thinking skills found frequently in schools and universities as well in Phineas and Ferb but less so in SpongeBob.

A recent study Led by University of Virginia psychologist Angeline Lillard, researchers randomly assigned 60 four-year-olds to view  fast paced television shows (specifically Sponge Bob in this instance) it was  found that (from watching it), a toddlers attention was temporarily delayed and they performed more poorly than the kids that didn't watch it. They don't know what lasting effects are... Many parents don’t allow their children to watch SpongeBob or any shows like it. – ABC News 9/12 /2011

 

Literary Devices and Academic Vocabulary Word Bank:

Personification is when you give human qualities to an object or animal. Authors use it to add interest or understanding to a poem or story though comparison or contrast.

 

Conflict can be put into several types: the “Big Four” types of literary conflict:

Man vs. Man / Man vs. Nature / Man vs. Society / Man vs. Self

Nature: the phenomena of the physical world collectively, including plants, animals, the landscape, and other features and products of the earth, as opposed to humans or human creations.

Society: people in general thought of as living together in organized communities with shared laws, traditions, and values.

Protagonist: the leading character or one of the major characters in a drama, movie, novel, or other fictional text.

Versus: as opposed to; in contrast to "weighing the pros and cons of graduation versus dropping out and earning less" abbreviated with the following  v., vs.

 

There are many specific and detailed examples (evidence) of conflict in this text / media. Identify an example for each of the following:

Man vs. Man     _____________________________               versus  _____________________________

Man vs. Nature _____________________________              v              _____________________________

Man vs. Society _____________________________             vs           _____________________________

Man vs. Self      _____________________________               versus  _____________________________

  

In order to have details for a written response you will keep notes in the form of a Venn diagram below. 

You will contrast the behavior of the Apes and Humans as you work to identify a central idea about civilized and uncivilized behavior for the topics in the central column:

 

Unique to Apes

Similar

Unique to Humans

 

 

 

Character

 

 

 

 

 

 

Society

 

 

 

 

 

Conflict

 

 

 

 

 

Communication

 

 

 

 

 

Thinking

 

 

 

 

 

Feeling

 

 

 

 

 

Morals

 

Based on the evidence above I claim that the central idea about civilized and uncivilized behavior in this text by Edgar Rice Burroughs can be stated as:

 

 

 

 

Tuesday

Dec 6

 
The Essential Question for this unit:

What does it mean to be a human being?

Supporting Questions:

  1. What does it mean to be an outsider?
  2. What is a dominant culture?
  3. Is it easier for some people to fit in to the dominant society than others? Why?
  4. Is fitting into the dominant society desirable? Why/ why not?
  5. What common themes unify the experience of being an outsider?
  6. How do we respond to forced assimilation?
  7. Does the way we react shape who we are? How?

Continue analysis of media we view / read in part or whole:
Tarzan of the Apes, by Edgar Rice Burroughs
Adapted to film in 

Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes

Film version was available HERE

Wednesday

Dec 7

Faculty Meeting
Computer Lab 



Quarter Two  Week Four

Based on our study of what it means to be a human being we have taken notes about how Edgar Rice Burroughs causes "Tarzan" and his audience to define himself as both an animal and as a human.  As John Clayton, The Lord of Greystoke, returns to British society he makes some mistakes that set him apart... and not always in a good way.  He does not know how to behave and Jane is giving him lessons.  Your job is to help create a handbook / guide / "How to" in order to help him fit into our society and be a success:

   
 

Etiquette, Manners, and Civilization Project for 2017  WORD DOC HERE

What is etiquette?  here

Look HERE here here here here  or... click the quote for Google:

Respect, kindness, and consideration form the basis of good manners and good citizen-ship. Etiquette becomes the language of manners. Rules of etiquette cover behavior in talking, acting, living, and moving; in other words, every type of interaction and every situation.

As we have seen in our study of “What does it mean to be a human being?”  there are many examples of people unfamiliar with how to behave.  We may have laughed, felt sorry for, or been shocked by their difficulties. 

For the following two sections, you may work in a group of no more than three.  Expect that you may present your work to the class.

PART 1 (60%) -- The task is to make a guide/ handout of the following topics and subtopics for a person living here in 2016-17 that will help them be civilized and socially successful.  Design your manual to teach etiquette for the most common or annoying errors you have observed others make where possible.  Explain what the purpose of the “rule” is for each of the following situations.  The goal of this section is to make being with most people pleasant and civilized.

 

1 Topic: Eating    be sure to address the three subtopics.

At the dinner table

In a cafeteria

At a formal dinner

 

2 Topic: The Party

Conversation

Dancing

Mingling

 

3 Topic: The Date

Making a Date /  Ending a Date

Meeting Family

Asking for Marriage

 

4 Topic: Education

High School

College

The Classroom

 

5 Topic: Smart Phone / Cell phone

In Movie / Waiting Room

Texting

Taking Pictures/Video

 

6 Topic: Any appropriate topic and three subtopics of your choice

 

 

 

 

 

Part 2 (40%) —Select two of the following questions and research several sources in order to be able to explain your answers for the following in your own words (do not copy and paste) and write a brief response for both:

 

Choice A – What is etiquette why do humans have etiquette?  Do animals have etiquette?

Choice B – How can etiquette help us? Who does etiquette do for us?

Choice C – How does etiquette relate to class, education, and social status?

Choice D – What happens to people who reject etiquette and manners? How is a person with bad manners treated?

Choice E – What is business etiquette? What is interview etiquette?

Choice F – Can manners make you money?

Choice G – Are the manners for adults and children the same?

Choice H – Are there manners for being stopped/arrested?

Choice I   – How should people apologize for bad manners?

Choice J  – How should you deal with someone being rude to you?



Send me a copy of your work to my e-mail or place it on a jump drive before class Monday.
James.Galanaugh@Longwoodcsd.org

or


Have a hard copy to hand me Monday at the start of class.

 

Thursday

Dec 8

Computer Lab Work on etiquette Due Monday



Send me a copy of your work to my e-mail or place it on a jump drive before class Monday.
James.Galanaugh@Longwoodcsd.org

or


Have a hard copy to hand me Monday at the start of class.

Friday

 

Dec 9

Computer Lab Work on etiquette for Due Monday







Send me a copy of your work to my e-mail or place it on a jump drive before class Monday.




James.Galanaugh@Longwoodcsd.org

or

Have a hard copy to hand me Monday at the start of class.

















     Back to Top

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week Five

Monday

Dec 12

  Week Five 

Present your Manual / Guide / "How to" Assignment to the Class   (optional for additional credit)

Tarzan-- worksheet -- complete Venn Diagram not paragraph.


Last Stages of St Lucy

Interim Reports this week.

Tuesday

Dec 13

 Present your Manual / Guide / "How to" Assignment to the Class  (optional for additional credit)

Read last pages of St. Lucy's Distributed in class and  view an adapted film for Thursday's assignment:

Adapted Film  ---   St. Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised by Wolves   20min


Move into groups of no more than 6.

Read and take notes on the last pages of St. Lucy's Home for Girls Raised by Wolves distributed in class (stages 4 and 5).

 Work together to describe Claudette’s reasons for treating Mirabella the way she does or predict what will happens to Mirabella in a paragraph.

 Provide evidence from both stage 4 and 5.  Due Thursday.




Wednesday

Dec 14

Quarter Two

Meet in Library   Complete Library assignment.

Thursday

Dec 15

Continue Unit:  Short Stories -- Fiction and non fiction with annotation. Additionally, we are close reading and learning vocabulary from context. This foundation is one they will build upon throughout the year, so its introduction here is critical.


Students complete reading Karen Russell’s short story, “
St. Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised by Wolves.” 

The Essential Question for this unit:

What does it mean to be a human being?

Supporting Questions:

  1. What does it mean to be an outsider?
  2. What is a dominant culture?
  3. Is it easier for some people to fit in to the dominant society than others? Why?
  4. Is fitting into the dominant society desirable? Why/ why not?
  5. What common themes unify the experience of being an outsider?
  6. How do we respond to forced assimilation?
  7. Does the way we react shape who we are? How?

Please take a seat...LOL!

 

 

 

 

1)    Take out your annotations from the start of the story (they were returned to you Tuesday) and /or look on with someone in your group.

 

2)    Use the five different sheets of construction paper where each color represents a different stage of the girl’s development.

 

Stage 1 is the color ____________________ Stage 2 is the color ____________________ Stage 3 is the color ____________________ Stage 4 is the color ____________________ Stage 5 is the color ____________________

 

3)    Fold the sheets horizontally so that there are no fewer than 6 even strips. 

 

4)    Each member of your group will share one example with evidence per stage per strip—it can be a literary device, quote, question, or prediction.

 

 

OPTIONS:   Contrasting characterization of Mirabella and Jeanette,

Speaker/Narrator (Claudette) & The Pure Bred Girls,

Point of View,

Imagery,

Metaphor,

Specific types of conflict: Man vs. Man / Man vs. Nature / Man vs. Society / Man vs. Self

 

5)    You will then have to read the final two stages (8 pages) and make awesome observations for the last two stages.

 

Observation 1

 

Observation 2

 

 

 

6)    Cut each stage into strips and fold them into chain links making a chain from stage one to stage five (see your color key) using a stapler.  Repeat the pattern so that two of the same colors do not touch.  Attach your chain to another groups… be sure to leave one link open for this!  LOL!

 

7)    Lastly, on the back of this sheet, describe Claudette’s reasons for treating Mirabella the way she does or  predict what will happens to Mirabella with evidence from stages 1-5.

 

 

 

Friday

Dec 16

Adapted Film  ---   St. Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised by Wolves   20min



Complete


Move into groups
Complete Paragraph / Paragraphs for MONDAY.

   Back to Top

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week Six

Monday

Dec 19

 
Paragraph / Paragraph response due at start of class.

 

The media we are viewing and or reading is based on the following text by Charles Dickens

A Christmas Carol

Assignment in Word doc HERE  if you are absent -- just use any paper (white is ok).


Do your best to find the following as each is present =  Foreshadowing, Flashback, Metaphor, Conflict, Imagery, Characterization, Irony, Personification & Conflict

If you have any other color you are tracking characteristics of Ebenezer, provide a brief example from the text. Indicate if the characteristic is positive or negative with a + sign or – sign.

I am distributing construction paper. 
Fold your construction paper as shown to make 6 equal strips of about 1.5 to 2 inches wide.

If you have been given white, gold, or green you are tracking literary elements from the following list and a brief example from the text / film.  Foreshadowing, Flashback, Metaphor, Conflict, Imagery, Characterization, Irony, Personification & Conflict


When you have filled your paper you are ready for the last step we will do on Friday.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday

Dec 20

 Today we will further explore the role of symbolism combined with dynamic (changeable) and static (unchanging) characterization by creating a physical symbol in the classroom.


The media we are viewing and or reading is based on the following text by Charles Dickens

A Christmas Carol


Do your best to find the following as each is present =  Foreshadowing, Flashback, Metaphor, Conflict, Imagery, Characterization, Irony, Personification & Conflict

If you have any other color you are tracking characteristics of Ebenezer, provide a brief example from the text. Indicate if the characteristic is positive or negative with a + sign or – sign.

I am distributing construction paper. 
Fold your construction paper as shown to make strips of about 1.5 to 2 inches wide.

If you have been given white, gold, or green you are tracking literary elements from the following list and a brief example from the text.


When you have filled your paper you are ready for the last step we will do on Friday.

Wednesday

Dec 21

 Winter Solstice!

WINTER BEGAN @545am!  LET THE LIGHT RETURN!

A Christmas Carol

Assignment in Word doc HERE  if you are absent -- just use any paper (white is ok).



Today we continue to explore the role of symbolism combined with dynamic (changeable) and static (unchanging) characterization by creating a physical symbol in the classroom.

Thursday

Dec 22

 Options for Reflection:

1)  Winter Solstice Assignment: The Return of Light.


2) Holiday Imagery Assignment: Wishes.




Friday

Dec 23

 Today we continue to explore the role of symbolism combined with dynamic (changeable) and static (unchanging) characterization by creating a physical symbol in the classroom.


Today we cut the construction paper into strips with characterization and literary devices then staple them into a chain to function as a symbol of the text we have read and the literary devices we have learned.  As Marley is forced to wear his chain because he did not learn his lesson in life, we can use the chain to decorate the classroom and not wear it precisely because we have learned tis lesson!  IT is a symbol of our triumph over ignorance!







Winter Recess Begins!

Quarter Two  Week Six     Back to Top

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week Seven 2017

Monday

Jan 2

 Winter Recess School Closed

Quarter Two  Week Seven

Tuesday

Jan 3

 
Complete New Years' Assignment:
Find the following as each is present =  Foreshadowing, Flashback, Metaphor, Conflict, Imagery, Characterization, Irony, Personification & Conflict

If you have any other color you are tracking characteristics of Ebenezer, provide a brief example from the text. Indicate if the characteristic is positive or negative with a + sign or – sign.

I am distributing construction paper. 
Fold your construction paper as shown to make 6 equal strips of about 1.5 to 2 inches wide.

If you have been given white, gold, or green you are tracking literary elements from the following list and a brief example from the text / film.  Foreshadowing, Flashback, Metaphor, Conflict, Imagery, Characterization, Irony, Personification & Conflict


When you have filled your paper you are ready for the last step -- show Mr.G and attach to the class chain!

Wednesday

Jan 4








Meet in Library-- 
Website Evaluations

How to evaluate sources? Here


Check out these 11 example hoax sites for use in your own classrooms:

  1. All About Explorers
  2. Dihydrogen Monoxide Research Division
  3. California’s Velcro Crop Under Challenge
  4. Feline Reactions to Bearded Men
  5. Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus
  6. Aluminum Foil Deflector Beanie
  7. British Stick Insect Foundation
  8. The Jackalope Conspiracy
  9. Buy Dehydrated Water
  10. Republic of Molossia
  11. Dog Island

Links for help with 
Citation and the MLA

Check out--
Mr. G's Official "Guide to Copying"

USE
EASYBIB with auto cite!
or
Son of Citation Machine

don't forget

Other stuff you probably learned but might like to review--


What is the MLA? HERE

How to evaluate sources? Here









 

Thursday

Jan 5

 


WRITING PARAGRAPHS REVIEW AND PRACTICE



Paragraph / Sentence Level (print notes for review here)

  1. TSLOFU (Paragraphs)
  2. SIM (T is for think! O is for organize) Brainstorm and Code (for paragraphs too!)
  3. Steps in creating a TSLOFU(CL) PARAGRAPH for a literary assignment.
  4. INTRODUCTORY  & POWERPOINT FOR REVIEW
  5. TRANSITION WORDS  See notes distributed and chart Transitions!
  6. Practice Topics
At Longwood HS we now use SIM language to describe  parts of the writing process however, in transition it can be helpful to recall other methods:
  1. Having trouble? here are some more ideas to Brainstorm or to THINK about Subtopics
  2. More about Graphic Organizers

Friday

Jan 6

 


WRITING PARAGRAPHS REVIEW AND PRACTICE

Paragraph / Sentence Level (print notes for review here)

  1. TSLOFU (Paragraphs)
  2. SIM (T is for think! O is for organize) Brainstorm and Code (for paragraphs too!)
  3. Steps in creating a TSLOFU(CL) PARAGRAPH for a literary assignment.
  4. INTRODUCTORY  & POWERPOINT FOR REVIEW
  5. TRANSITION WORDS  See notes distributed and chart Transitions!
  6. Practice Topics
At Longwood HS we now use SIM language to describe  parts of the writing process however, in transition it can be helpful to recall other methods:
  1. Having trouble? here are some more ideas to Brainstorm or to THINK about Subtopics
  2. More about Graphic Organizers


HW  Complete paragraph for peer review on Monday-- 2 grades.



    Back to Top

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week Eight

Monday

Jan 9

 

Complete peer review.  Have at least one person read your paragraph and ask them if they have any questions and print their name next to your name on top then sign.
The reader only gets credit if there are no problems with the paragraph or if any problems are circled for correction.
Give a self quiz on the spelling and vocabulary words and partnering up or trying to define the words on your own.  

USING LINCS to study vocabulary!

This self evaluation will help you focus on getting the vocabulary 100%!
Mark those you need to especially study.

​Select a word you need to remember to create a word tent for classroom display (better if no one else is doing the same word)

Fold the paper in 1/2 so that it makes a tent that can stand on a table.
Write word clearly on one side so it is clear when the tent is standing.
Write definition on inside.
Reminding word and story
Picture​


USE VOCABULARY.COM  HERE

QUIZ ON FRIDAY  SPELL DEFINE USE IN SENTENCE--  10 words randomly chosen from the following:

Mid Term Vocabulary REVIEW

  1. manger

  2. shabby

  3. noisy

  4. disappointment

  5. outdone

  6. fleshy prawns.

  7. appalling mounds

  8. slimy rock

  9. bulging

  10. pleaded

  11. rubbery

  12. dried fungus

  13. crisscrossed

  14. resembled

  15. clamor

  16. grunted

  17. despair

  18. chopsticks

  19. murmured

  20. disappear

  21. belched

  22. custom

  23. satisfied

  24. astonished

  25. muster

  26. stunned

  27. beige tweed

  28. crush

  29. particular

  30. culture

  31. Embarrassed

  32. Fearful       

  33. Proud                  

  34. Disgust                

  35. narrator’s

  36. shame

  37. literary element

  38. paradox

  39. tone

  40. theme

  41. hyperbole

  42. grimaced

  43. smile

  44. frown

  45. Minister

  46. imitation

  47. symbolic

  48. rude

  49. lack of control.

  50. acknowledgment 

  51. attempt

  52. evidence

  53. ashamed

  54. concerned

  55. dress code.

  56. imagery

  57. first person point of view.

  58. third person point of view.

  59. omniscient point of view.

  60. second person point of view.

  61. celebrating

  62. understand

  63. welcome

  64. establish

  65. narrator

  66. internal conflict

  67. external conflict

  68. passage

  69. well-developed

  70. describing

  71. characterization 




Tuesday

Jan 10

 1 2 3 9 meet
Half Day -- Professional Development

Wednesday

Jan 11

 Library Citation, Plagiarism, and Copyright
Links for help with
Citation and the MLA

Check out--
Mr. G's Official "Guide to Copying"

USE
EASYBIB with auto cite!
or
Son of Citation Machine

don't forget

Other stuff you probably learned but might like to review--


What is the MLA? HERE

How to evaluate sources? Here

Thursday

Jan 12

Quarter Two  Week Eight  HW 

Quiz on Monday 's vocabulary:  spelling, definition and use in sentences from words on tomorrow. 

Meet in 2118 Computer lab to read about the AIR project.

Meet in Library TUESDAY 17th to begin book selection and approval process. Book is due Monday  January 30th Counts as a HW grade each day not in class from that day on in the second quarter.

AN INTRODUCTION TO THE PROJECT
ON Tuesday we are going to the library to select a book for the AIR project.  HERE

Answer the questions below as part of this project:
 

Answer the following questions and begin to plan for the project.   
1)  What is the most important benefit of reading?  Explain why you believe this in sentences.    Here
2)  How much will you read a day in college-- research and cite your answer.  Here
3)  What other things will happen in your life? Explain why you believe this in sentences.  Here

4) How can you actually use this project to make you stronger smarter and faster for the real world? What college and career readiness skills would be a good investment of your time and effort? What do you know need practice in?  What will prepare you for college or a career? Would you like suggestions or to determine your goals yourself? For a list of ideas look-- Here

5) THEN--  Research five books you might like to read for your project or in the future that are not taught as part of our school (on grade level or above) give the title call number and describe how you could actually obtain each one by next Friday.  Extra credit if you can find a book on a freshman reading list to a college you might go to... be sure to cite how you know it is read in college.  Here   9th grade reading level books  Here

Library Catalogue Here       Google:


Meet in Library TUESDAY 17th to begin book selection and approval process. Book is due Monday  January 30th Counts as a HW grade each day not in class from that day on in the second quarter.


Friday

Jan 13





Quiz on Monday 's vocabulary:  spelling 4pts, definition 4pts and use in sentences to show meaning 2pts from words. 


MID TERM EXAM next Wed and Thursday  bring a #2 pencil.








 

Back to Top

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week Nine

Monday

Jan 16s

 Dr. King's Birthday School Closed

Tuesday

Jan 17

 

Meet in Library to begin book selection and approval process. Book is due Monday  January 30th Counts as a HW grade each day not in class from that day on in the second quarter.

AN INTRODUCTION TO THE PROJECT
ON Tuesday we are going to the library to select a book for the AIR project.  HERE

Answer the questions below as part of this project:
 

Answer the following questions and begin to plan for the project.   
1)  What is the most important benefit of reading?  Explain why you believe this in sentences.    Here
2)  How much will you read a day in college-- research and cite your answer.  Here
3)  What other things will happen in your life? Explain why you believe this in sentences.  Here

4) How can you actually use this project to make you stronger smarter and faster for the real world? What college and career readiness skills would be a good investment of your time and effort? What do you know need practice in?  What will prepare you for college or a career? Would you like suggestions or to determine your goals yourself? For a list of ideas look-- Here

5) THEN--  Research five books you might like to read for your project or in the future that are not taught as part of our school (on grade level or above) give the title call number and describe how you could actually obtain each one by next Friday.  Extra credit if you can find a book on a freshman reading list to a college you might go to... be sure to cite how you know it is read in college.  Here   9th grade reading level books  Here

Library Catalogue Here       Google:


Meet in Library TUESDAY 17th to begin book selection and approval process. Book is due Monday  January 30th Counts as a HW grade each day not in class from that day on in the second quarter. Meet in Library to begin book selection and approval process. Book is due Monday  January 30th Counts as a HW grade each day not in class from that day on in the second quarter.

Wednesday

Jan 18

Quarter Two  Week Nine    

 

 MID TERM EXAM  IN CLASS
If you are legally absent from class (not late)miss both days you may have to come to a make up midterm during testing week.

Bring a pen and a #2 pencil.

Thursday

Jan 19

 MID TERM EXAM  IN CLASS
Bring a pen and a #2 pencil.
If you are legally absent from class (not late)miss both days you may have to come to a make up midterm during testing week.


Re read your response, make corrections or additions if needed -- turn all papers in then continue to work quietly on one of the following:

Plan and write a letter to President Trump that he would receive after his inauguration.   The College Board's National Commission on Writing has published a selection of student writing about issues they want our new President to address, "Letters to the President: Students' Voices." FOR CREDIT THE LETTER MUST REMAIN RESPECTFUL (you are free to agree or disagree or bring up concerns or wishes[a threat is an actual crime])  AND CONTAIN NO ERRORS OR SLANG as we honor our peaceful transition of power and the United States of America.

For this EXTRA CREDIT ASSIGNMENT only-- due by the end of class Friday-- in proper business letter format
FOR CREDIT YOU MUST USE THE FOLLOWING FORMAT:

Block Format

When writing business letters, you must pay special attention to the format and font used. The most common layout of a business letter is known as block format. Using this format, the entire letter is left justified and single spaced except for a double space between paragraphs.

Parts of a Business Letter

This resource is organized in the order in which you should write a business letter, starting with the sender's address if the letter is not written on letterhead.

Sender's Address

The sender's address usually is included in letterhead. If you are not using letterhead, include the sender's address at the top of the letter one line above the date. Do not write the sender's name or title, as it is included in the letter's closing. Include only the street address, city, and zip code.

Date

The date line is used to indicate the date the letter was written. However, if your letter is completed over a number of days, use the date it was finished in the date line. When writing to companies within the United States, use the American date format. (The United States-based convention for formatting a date places the month before the day. For example: June 11, 2001. ) Write out the month, day and year two inches from the top of the page. Depending which format you are using for your letter, either left justify the date or tab to the center point and type the date.

Inside Address

The inside address is the recipient's address. It is always best to write to a specific individual at the firm to which you are writing. If you do not have the person's name, do some research by calling the company or speaking with employees from the company. Include a personal title such as Ms., Mrs., Mr., or Dr. Follow a woman's preference in being addressed as Miss, Mrs., or Ms. If you are unsure of a woman's preference in being addressed, use Ms. If there is a possibility that the person to whom you are writing is a Dr. or has some other title, use that title. Usually, people will not mind being addressed by a higher title than they actually possess. To write the address, use the U.S. Post Office Format. For international addresses, type the name of the country in all-capital letters on the last line. The inside address begins one line below the sender's address or one line below the date. It should be left justified, no matter which format you are using.


The White House
1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20500

Salutation

Use the same name as the inside address, including the personal title. If you know the person and typically address them by their first name, it is acceptable to use only the first name in the salutation (for example: Dear Lucy:). In all other cases, however, use the personal title and last/family name followed by a colon. Leave one line blank after the salutation.    President Trump   or   Dear President Trump.

If you don't know a reader's gender, use a nonsexist salutation, such as their job title followed by the receiver's name. It is also acceptable to use the full name in a salutation if you cannot determine gender. For example, you might write Dear Chris Harmon: if you were unsure of Chris's gender.

Body

For block and modified block formats, single space and left justify each paragraph within the body of the letter. Leave a blank line between each paragraph. When writing a business letter, be careful to remember that conciseness is very important. In the first paragraph, consider a friendly opening and then a statement of the main point. The next paragraph should begin justifying the importance of the main point. In the next few paragraphs, continue justification with background information and supporting details. The closing paragraph should restate the purpose of the letter and, in some cases, request some type of action.

FOR CREDIT THE LETTER MUST REMAIN RESPECTFUL AND CONTAIN NO ERRORS OR SLANG

 

Closing

The closing begins at the same vertical point as your date and one line after the last body paragraph. Capitalize the first word only (for example: Thank you) and leave four lines between the closing and the sender's name for a signature. If a colon follows the salutation, a comma should follow the closing; otherwise, there is no punctuation after the closing.








Friday

Jan 20d

 

 

Make up Mid Term then select from the following choices:

 

1) Begin reading for Accountable Independent Reading Project  (AIR project  Link is HERE).

 

2) Project Proposal 10% 

In a one (1) page typed statement, give the title and author you are reading, the author of your book, why you are interested in this book/subject, and a description what your actual final project might look like based on your clearly identified personal learning goals. Also, if your parent reads along (with another copy) as you read it, you will not have to do the “book talk!” Simply have them write their intentions at the bottom of your proposal where they agree to keep to your schedule.  Generally, I just need to know that you are thinking about the learning process and that you have some ideas as you establish a timeline that will allow you to complete the book by assigned date, and the project by the end of the following week.  If you wish to have some in class reading/project time as part of your proposal include it in the proposal.  In addition to the 10% of the total project grade this part is due ON TIME because you may need to keep a journal as you read (see project ideas HERE).

 

or select this opportunity for extra credit based (score is based on quality!)

 

3)

Plan and write a letter to President Trump that he would receive after his inauguration.   The College Board's National Commission on Writing has published a selection of student writing about issues they want our new President to address, "Letters to the President: Students' Voices." FOR CREDIT THE LETTER MUST REMAIN RESPECTFUL (you are free to agree or disagree or bring up concerns or wishes [a threat is an actual crime don't do it])  AND CONTAIN NO ERRORS OR SLANG as we honor our peaceful transition of power and the United States of America. 

For this EXTRA CREDIT ASSIGNMENT only-- due by the end of class Friday-- in proper business letter format
FOR CREDIT YOU MUST USE THE FOLLOWING FORMAT:

Block Format

When writing business letters, you must pay special attention to the format and font used. The most common layout of a business letter is known as block format. Using this format, the entire letter is left justified and single spaced except for a double space between paragraphs.

Parts of a Business Letter

This resource is organized in the order in which you should write a business letter, starting with the sender's address if the letter is not written on letterhead.

Sender's Address

The sender's address usually is included in letterhead. If you are not using letterhead, include the sender's address at the top of the letter one line above the date. Do not write the sender's name or title, as it is included in the letter's closing. Include only the street address, city, and zip code.

Date

The date line is used to indicate the date the letter was written. However, if your letter is completed over a number of days, use the date it was finished in the date line. When writing to companies within the United States, use the American date format. (The United States-based convention for formatting a date places the month before the day. For example: June 11, 2001. ) Write out the month, day and year two inches from the top of the page. Depending which format you are using for your letter, either left justify the date or tab to the center point and type the date.

Inside Address

The inside address is the recipient's address. It is always best to write to a specific individual at the firm to which you are writing. If you do not have the person's name, do some research by calling the company or speaking with employees from the company. Include a personal title such as Ms., Mrs., Mr., or Dr. Follow a woman's preference in being addressed as Miss, Mrs., or Ms. If you are unsure of a woman's preference in being addressed, use Ms. If there is a possibility that the person to whom you are writing is a Dr. or has some other title, use that title. Usually, people will not mind being addressed by a higher title than they actually possess. To write the address, use the U.S. Post Office Format. For international addresses, type the name of the country in all-capital letters on the last line. The inside address begins one line below the sender's address or one line below the date. It should be left justified, no matter which format you are using.


The White House
1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20500

Salutation

Use the same name as the inside address, including the personal title. If you know the person and typically address them by their first name, it is acceptable to use only the first name in the salutation (for example: Dear Lucy:). In all other cases, however, use the personal title and last/family name followed by a colon. Leave one line blank after the salutation.    President Trump   or   Dear President Trump.

If you don't know a reader's gender, use a nonsexist salutation, such as their job title followed by the receiver's name. It is also acceptable to use the full name in a salutation if you cannot determine gender. For example, you might write Dear Chris Harmon: if you were unsure of Chris's gender.

Body

For block and modified block formats, single space and left justify each paragraph within the body of the letter. Leave a blank line between each paragraph. When writing a business letter, be careful to remember that conciseness is very important. In the first paragraph, consider a friendly opening and then a statement of the main point. The next paragraph should begin justifying the importance of the main point. In the next few paragraphs, continue justification with background information and supporting details. The closing paragraph should restate the purpose of the letter and, in some cases, request some type of action.

FOR CREDIT THE LETTER MUST REMAIN RESPECTFUL AND CONTAIN NO ERRORS OR SLANG

 

Closing

The closing begins at the same vertical point as your date and one line after the last body paragraph. Capitalize the first word only (for example: Thank you) and leave four lines between the closing and the sender's name for a signature. If a colon follows the salutation, a comma should follow the closing; otherwise, there is no punctuation after the closing.





 

 

 

 

 

 

Back to Top

 

 

 

 

 

Week Ten

Monday

Jan 23

GRADES ARE BEING CALCULATED  Questions? HERE

 

Google:

Quarter Two 

 

 

 

1) Begin reading for Accountable Independent Reading Project  (AIR project  Link is HERE).  PROJECT IS DUE WITH ALL PARTS COMPLETED Friday March 24

 

2) Project Proposal 10% 

In a one (1) page typed statement, give the title and author you are reading, the author of your book, why you are interested in this book/subject, and a description what your actual final project might look like based on your clearly identified personal learning goals. Also, if your parent reads along (with another copy) as you read it, you will not have to do the “book talk!” Simply have them write their intentions at the bottom of your proposal where they agree to keep to your schedule.  Generally, I just need to know that you are thinking about the learning process and that you have some ideas as you establish a timeline that will allow you to complete the book by assigned date, and the project by the end of the following week.  If you wish to have some in class reading/project time as part of your proposal include it in the proposal.  In addition to the 10% of the total project grade this part is due ON TIME because you may need to keep a journal as you read (see project ideas HERE).


SAMPLE PROPOSAL FORMAT

For the project portion of my Accountable Independent Reading Project  I will 

(see project ideas HERE)

_____________________________________________________________.

Use sentences for the following:
MY Learning goal How it will look in MY project*
  For an A
  For a B
  For a C
  For a D
 
*note that turning it in on time is not connected to what you learned and is penalized not in your rubric.
   

Create a PROJECT RUBRIC With Evidence Based Claims.

  1. This should be related to your learning goal. Be able to describe how you will earn an A B C D and even the dreaded F. 

  2. Evidence Based Claims must be part of every assignment. What evidence can you provide in your proposed project?  Checkhere and see me for ideas.

  3. If your parent / guardian will be reading with you they must write me a note or e-mail with your final grade as part of your "Book Talk."





Final Class Day of Second Quarter.
 
Week Ten     Back to Top






Tuesday

Jan 24

Testing Week  NO ENGLISH TEST SCHEDULED CONTACT OFFICE FOR ANY MAKE UP SCHEDULE

Wednesday

Jan 25

Testing Week

Thursday

Jan 26

Testing Week

Friday

Jan 27

 Testing Week    End of Marking Period

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week One

Monday

Jan 30

Quarter Three  Week One

 Welcome to the Third Quarter!  B day.
 
REMINDER: How to Succeed in English

NEW 
Be an On Time Champion!    (The secret is to be a little better each day! Don't practice like everyone else!)





 

 

Language and Love THE THEME  in Quarter Three:

Essential Question:

What is the nature of true love?

Supporting Questions (to explore as appropriate for individual students and classes):

  1. Are the "rules" of love the same across cultures and time?

  2. Is love the same for both genders?

  3. How does media portray love?

  4. What is Platonic love?

  5. What is love at first sight?

  6. Does media help us understand love?

  7. What are the messages about love in media?

  8. What role does social media play in relationships?

  9. What age are children able to have a serious relationship?

  10. What role should a parent have in a child's relationship?

  11. What are the boundaries for sacrifice in the name of love?

  12. Are the messages about love from Shakespeare valuable today?

  13. Why would parents think they know something about love?

  14. What are the dangers of love?

  15. Is an arranged marriage good for children?

  16. Is love possible if you never see the other person with your eyes?

  17. Would you still love someone if they were badly disfigured in an accident?

  18. Who should you take advice about love and relationships from?




TODAY
Book approval is due for Accountable Independent Reading Project  (AIR project  Link is HERE).  PROJECT IS DUE WITH ALL PARTS COMPLETED Friday March 24 Bring your book everyday for a grade!
   DO NOT "SHARE" THIS  ALL WORK MUST BE TURNED IN IN HARD COPY


READING--   ROMEO AND JULIET ACTS I  II and III  (RESEARCH AND PRESENTATION ROLES ASSSIGNED)
PRESENT YOUR WORK TO THE CLASS MONDAY AND TUESDAY  YOU MAY WORK ALONE OR IN PAIRS HOWEVER EACH PERSON IS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE NUMBER ASSIGNED TO THEM.

Plot Summary:

1 Plot—all conflicts in the act identified (self, nature, society, etc.)

2 Overview of timeline of events and predictions for next act based on evidence.

 

Characterization:

3 Character – Motivation and analysis of development

4 Character -- Relationships with friends and other characters in a character MAP

 

Language and Culture of Shakespeare’s Time

5 Roles of men and women of Shakespeare’s Time

6 Comparing Modern and Shakespearian Language with quotes posters/memes and explanations of choice

 

Literary Devices

7 Metaphor and Simile how are they used and what do they mean?

8 Puns how are they used and what do they mean?

 

The Theme of Love

9 How is love portrayed as far a family and with others (consider—infatuation, puppy love, love at first sight, immature love, mature love, friendship) in terms of intensity, quality, and time?

 

The Themes of Youth and Foolishness

10 How is youth and foolishness portrayed?


Tuesday

Jan 31

 



READING--   ROMEO AND JULIET ACTS I  II and III  (RESEARCH AND PRESENTATION ROLES ASSSIGNED)

PRESENT YOUR WORK TO THE CLASS MONDAY AND TUESDAY  YOU MAY WORK ALONE OR IN PAIRS HOWEVER EACH PERSON IS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE NUMBER ASSIGNED TO THEM.

 

 

READING--   ROMEO AND JULIET ACTS I  II and III  (RESEARCH AND PRESENTATION ROLES ASSSIGNED)
PRESENT YOUR WORK TO THE CLASS MONDAY AND TUESDAY  YOU MAY WORK ALONE OR IN PAIRS HOWEVER EACH PERSON IS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE NUMBER ASSIGNED TO THEM.

Plot Summary:

1 Plot—all conflicts in the act identified (self, nature, society, etc.)

2 Overview of timeline of events and predictions for next act based on evidence.

 

Characterization:

3 Character – Motivation and analysis of development

4 Character -- Relationships with friends and other characters in a character MAP

 

Language and Culture of Shakespeare’s Time

5 Roles of men and women of Shakespeare’s Time

6 Comparing Modern and Shakespearian Language with quotes posters/memes and explanations of choice

 

Literary Devices

7 Metaphor and Simile how are they used and what do they mean?

8 Puns how are they used and what do they mean?

 

The Theme of Love

9 How is love portrayed as far a family and with others (consider—infatuation, puppy love, love at first sight, immature love, mature love, friendship) in terms of intensity, quality, and time?

 

The Themes of Youth and Foolishness

10 How is youth and foolishness portrayed?


Wednesday

Feb 1




READING--   ROMEO AND JULIET ACTS I  II and III  (RESEARCH AND PRESENTATION ROLES ASSSIGNED)

PRESENT YOUR WORK TO THE CLASS MONDAY AND TUESDAY  YOU MAY WORK ALONE OR IN PAIRS HOWEVER EACH PERSON IS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE NUMBER ASSIGNED TO THEM.
READING--   ROMEO AND JULIET ACTS I  II and III  (RESEARCH AND PRESENTATION ROLES ASSSIGNED)
PRESENT YOUR WORK TO THE CLASS MONDAY AND TUESDAY  YOU MAY WORK ALONE OR IN PAIRS HOWEVER EACH PERSON IS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE NUMBER ASSIGNED TO THEM.

Plot Summary:

1 Plot—all conflicts in the act identified (self, nature, society, etc.)

2 Overview of timeline of events and predictions for next act based on evidence.

 

Characterization:

3 Character – Motivation and analysis of development

4 Character -- Relationships with friends and other characters in a character MAP

 

Language and Culture of Shakespeare’s Time

5 Roles of men and women of Shakespeare’s Time

6 Comparing Modern and Shakespearian Language with quotes posters/memes and explanations of choice

 

Literary Devices

7 Metaphor and Simile how are they used and what do they mean?

8 Puns how are they used and what do they mean?

 

The Theme of Love

9 How is love portrayed as far a family and with others (consider—infatuation, puppy love, love at first sight, immature love, mature love, friendship) in terms of intensity, quality, and time?

 

The Themes of Youth and Foolishness

10 How is youth and foolishness portrayed?


 

Thursday

Feb 2 





READING--   ROMEO AND JULIET ACTS I  II and III  (RESEARCH AND PRESENTATION ROLES ASSSIGNED)
PRESENT YOUR WORK TO THE CLASS MONDAY AND TUESDAY  YOU MAY WORK ALONE OR IN PAIRS HOWEVER EACH PERSON IS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE NUMBER ASSIGNED TO THEM.

 

 

READING--   ROMEO AND JULIET ACTS I  II and III  (RESEARCH AND PRESENTATION ROLES ASSSIGNED)
PRESENT YOUR WORK TO THE CLASS MONDAY AND TUESDAY  YOU MAY WORK ALONE OR IN PAIRS HOWEVER EACH PERSON IS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE NUMBER ASSIGNED TO THEM.
READING--   ROMEO AND JULIET ACTS I  II and III  (RESEARCH AND PRESENTATION ROLES ASSSIGNED)
PRESENT YOUR WORK TO THE CLASS MONDAY AND TUESDAY  YOU MAY WORK ALONE OR IN PAIRS HOWEVER EACH PERSON IS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE NUMBER ASSIGNED TO THEM.

Plot Summary:

1 Plot—all conflicts in the act identified (self, nature, society, etc.)

2 Overview of timeline of events and predictions for next act based on evidence.

 

Characterization:

3 Character – Motivation and analysis of development

4 Character -- Relationships with friends and other characters in a character MAP

 

Language and Culture of Shakespeare’s Time

5 Roles of men and women of Shakespeare’s Time

6 Comparing Modern and Shakespearian Language with quotes posters/memes and explanations of choice

 

Literary Devices

7 Metaphor and Simile how are they used and what do they mean?

8 Puns how are they used and what do they mean?

 

The Theme of Love

9 How is love portrayed as far a family and with others (consider—infatuation, puppy love, love at first sight, immature love, mature love, friendship) in terms of intensity, quality, and time?

 

The Themes of Youth and Foolishness

10 How is youth and foolishness portrayed?



Friday

Feb 3

Free read or complete Romeo and Juliet Presentation for Monday






Being On Time Champions!    (The secret is to be a little better each day! Don't practice like everyone else!)

    Back to Top

 

 

 

 

 

Week Two

Quarter Three  Week Two 

Monday

Feb 6

 New England Patriots running back James White scores a touchdown during overtime to win Super Bowl LI, 34
-28.
 

 

 

 

Share what you learned and turn it in with evidence from the act you read!

Plot Summary:

1 Plot—all conflicts in the act identified (self, nature, society, etc.)

2 Overview of timeline of events and predictions for next act based on evidence.

Characterization:

3 Character – Motivation and analysis of development

4 Character -- Relationships with friends and other characters in a character MAP

Language and Culture of Shakespeare’s Time

5 Roles of men and women of Shakespeare’s Time

6 Comparing Modern and Shakespearian Language with quotes posters/memes and explanations of choice

Literary Devices

7 Metaphor and Simile how are they used and what do they mean?

8 Puns how are they used and what do they mean?

The Theme of Love

9 How is love portrayed as far a family and with others (consider—infatuation, puppy love, love at first sight, immature love, mature love, friendship) in terms of intensity, quality, and time?

The Themes of Youth and Foolishness

10 How is youth and foolishness portrayed?

Tuesday

Feb 7

 






Complete presentations / view Acts 4 and 5  of Romeo and Juliet 
Traditional or Semiotic adaptations based on class choice (select link for information).

Meet in library tomorrow. 

Bring your book for your project every day!  We will be working on it this week.
Being prepared with your book will count as a HW assignment on days we are in the computer lab or are working on the project in class.  You must be prepared to show me.

Wednesday

Feb 8

Library Lesson  VRC

Thursday

Feb 9



SNOW DAY

Friday

Feb 10


SNOW DAY


   Back to Top

 

 

 

 

Week Three

Monday

Feb 13

 

Essential Question:

What is the nature of true love?

Supporting Questions (to explore as appropriate for individual students and classes):

1.     Are the "rules" of love the same across cultures and time?

2.     Is love the same for both genders?

3.     How does media portray love?

4.     What is Platonic love?

5.     What is love at first sight?

6.     Does media help us understand love?

7.     What are the messages about love in media?

8.     What role does social media play in relationships?

9.     What age are children able to have a serious relationship?

10.  What role should a parent have in a child's relationship?

11.  What are the boundaries for sacrifice in the name of love?

12.  Are the messages about love from Shakespeare valuable today?

13.  Why would parents think they know something about love?

14.  What are the dangers of love?

15.  Is an arranged marriage good for children?

16.  Is love possible if you never see the other person with your eyes?

17.  Would you still love someone if they were badly disfigured in an accident?

18.  Who should you take advice about love and relationships from?

 

 

Complete worksheet as directed to help you write a 7-10 sentence (minimum) properly structured paragraph with evidence about the superior example of romance and love between the following:  Romeo and Juliet (here) or Hitch (script here)?

You must use specific examples from each. The following worksheet and paragraph are due on or before Monday Feb 27 and count as a 2X weighted assessment grade.

Excerpts from the Hitch script make comments and corrections as needed:

Explain how “into” is used

 

 

 

Basic principles:    No woman wakes up saying:  "God, I hope I don't get swept off my feet today." Now, she might say, "This is a really bad time for me." Or something like, "I just need some space."   Or my personal favorite:  "I'm really into my career right now."

What kind of question is this (literary device)?

 

 

 

You believe that? Neither does she. You know why?

Does the speaker expect a response?

 

 

 

 

Because she's lying to you, that's why. You understand me? Lying. It's not a bad time for her. She doesn't need any space. She may be into her career...  but what she's really saying is, "Get away from me now." Or possibly, "Try harder, stupid." Well, which one is it? 

Ain’t is improper and should be

___________% of all human communication is nonverbal.  Body language. ______  % is your tone. So that means that _________  % of what you're saying... ain't coming out of your mouth.

 

Gonna  and  Wanna

 

Should be:

 

Of course she'll lie to you. She's a nice person, she doesn't wanna hurt your feelings. What else is she gonna say? She doesn't even know you.

 

 

 

What evidence does he cite for this claim:

 

 

 

eight out of women believe that the first kiss... will tell them everything they need to know about the relationship

 

 

 

 

 

Explain with evidence:

How does falling in love work according to HITCH?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Compare those views of "love" with the following excerpts:

Describe love based on the excerpt:

R Yes, this is what love does. My sadness sits heavy in my chest, and you want to add your own sadness to mine so there’s even more. I have too much sadness already, and now you’re going to make me sadder by feeling sorry for you. Here’s what love is: a smoke made out of lovers' sighs. When the smoke clears, love is a fire burning in your lover’s eyes. If you frustrate love, you get an ocean made out of lovers' tears. What else is love? It’s a wise form of madness. It’s a sweet lozenge that you choke on. Goodbye, cousin.

 

Describe the essential qualities of love based on the excerpt:

 

B The beautiful Rosaline whom you love so much will be at Capulet’s traditional feast, along with every beautiful woman in Verona. Go there and compare her objectively to some other girls I’ll show you. The woman who you think is as beautiful as a swan is going to look as ugly as a crow to you.

R If my eyes ever lie to me like that, let my tears turn into flames and burn them for being such obvious liars! A woman more beautiful than the one I love? The sun itself has never seen anyone as beautiful since the world began.

B Come on, you first decided she was beautiful when no one else was around. There was no one to compare her to except herself. But let your eyes compare her to another beautifulwoman who I’ll show you at this feast, and you won’t think she’s the best anymore.

R I’ll go with you. Not because I think you’ll show me anything better, but so I can see the woman I love.

 

What is ironic about them wearing masks?

 

M You’re a lover. Take Cupid’s wings and fly higher than the average man.

R His arrow has pierced me too deeply, so I can’t fly high with his cheerful feathers. Because this wound keeps me down, I can’t leap any higher than my dull sadness. I sink under the heavy weight of love.

M If you sink, you’re dragging love down. It’s not right to drag down something as tender as love.

R Is love really tender? I think it’s too rough, too rude, too rowdy, and it pricks like a thorn.

M If love plays rough with you, play rough with love. If you prick love when it pricks you, you’ll beat love down. Give me a mask to put my face in. A mask to put over my other mask. What do I care if some curious person sees my flaws? Let this mask, with its black eyebrows, blush for me.(theyput on masks)

 

Describe love based on the excerpt:

R (to a SERVINGMAN) Who is the girl on the arm of that lucky knight [guy] over there?

SERVINGMAN I don’t know, sir.

R Oh, she shows the torches how to burn bright! She stands out against the darkness like a jeweled earring hanging against the cheek of an African. Her beauty is too good for this world; so shows a snowy dove trooping with crows As yonder lady o'er her fellows shows. The measure done, I’ll watch her place of stand, And, touching hers, make blessèd my rude hand. Did my heart love till now? Forswear it, sight! For I ne'er saw true beauty till this night. She’s too beautiful to die and be buried. She outshines the other women like a white dove in the middle of a flock of crows. When this dance is over, I’ll see where she stands, and then I’ll touch her hand with my rough and ugly one. Did my heart ever love anyone before this moment? My eyes were liars, then, because I never saw true beauty before tonight.

 

 
















Meet in Computer Lab WED and Thursday.  Bring your book for your project every day!  You will be working on it this week after you complete the paragraph.

Tuesday

Feb 14

 



















Wednesday

Feb15

Half Day Parent Conference by Appointment

Computer Lab / Romeo and Juliet assignment-- dates adjusted for snow days and lost time.  There is HW over the holiday.



 AIR Accountable Independent Reading

Thursday

Feb 16

Computer Lab Computer Lab  Periods 1 2 and 4


HOMEWORK--

Part I

Complete worksheet as directed to help you write a 7-10 sentence (minimum) properly structured paragraph with evidence about the superior example of romance and love between the following:  Romeo and Juliet (here and here) or characters represented in Hitch (script here)?

You must use specific examples from each.   The following worksheet and paragraph are due on or before Monday Feb 27 and count as a 2X weighted assessment grade.



REMEMBER -- ANSWER THE QUESTION in the form of the best paragraph you have ever written!  Review --  here  and here

          Romeo and Juliet, is it the best love story ever?  

Use EVIDENCE-BASED CLAIMS (EBC) (here)

Process:

  1. Make a Claim (It is true that...   OR  It is not true that...)

  2. Support or refute the claim with the best evidence from different sides or perspectives about the claim.   

  3. Use the evidence to come to a conclusion.

  4. Incorporate the claim into an appropriate format for the audience or as directed.

Cite sources:  Shmoop   LitCharts 60 Sec Recap Crash Course in Lit.


Part II
TYPED PROPOSAL for Accountable Independent Reading Project  (AIR project  Link is HERE) is due Friday March 3.  PROJECT IS DUE WITH ALL PARTS COMPLETED Friday March 24.   DO NOT    "SHARE" no google drive/e-mail-- THIS and  ALL WORK MUST BE TURNED IN IN HARD COPY unless otherwise directed


 AIR Accountable Independent Reading


Friday

Feb17


Library Lesson Digital Citizenship



HOMEWORK---


Part I

Complete worksheet as directed to help you write a 7-10 sentence (minimum) properly structured paragraph with evidence about the superior example of romance and love between the following:  Romeo and Juliet (here and
here
) or characters represented in Hitch (script here)?

You must use specific examples from each.   The following worksheet and paragraph are due on or before Monday Feb 27 and count as a 2X weighted assessment grade.



REMEMBER -- ANSWER THE QUESTION in the form of the best paragraph you have ever written!  Review --  here  and here

          Romeo and Juliet, is it the best love story ever?  

Use EVIDENCE-BASED CLAIMS (EBC) (here)

Process:

  1. Make a Claim (It is true that...   OR  It is not true that...)

  2. Support or refute the claim with the best evidence from different sides or perspectives about the claim.   

  3. Use the evidence to come to a conclusion.

  4. Incorporate the claim into an appropriate format for the audience or as directed.


Cite sources:  Shmoop   LitCharts 60 Sec Recap Crash Course in Lit.



Part II
TYPED PROPOSAL for Accountable Independent Reading Project  (AIR project  Link is HERE) is due Friday March 3.  PROJECT IS DUE WITH ALL PARTS COMPLETED Friday March 24.   DO NOT    "SHARE" no google drive/e-mail-- THIS and  ALL WORK MUST BE TURNED IN IN HARD COPY unless otherwise directed

 AIR Accountable Independent Reading

Mid Winter
Recess Next Week- School Closed -- "gimme" a break already!

Quarter Three  Week Three     Back to Top

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week Four

Monday

Feb 27

Quarter Three  Week Four

Paragraph Due at start of class from Thursday Feb 16.

PERFECT PARTNER (for marriage) TAG CLOUD---  Due by end of class Wednesday.

The following might be an example of the "perfect student"
(size/position indicates importance):



Create a tag cloud from our exploration of the essential question for this unit to be displayed in class:

Essential Question:

What is the nature of true love?

Supporting Questions (to explore as appropriate for individual students and classes):

1.     Are the "rules" of love the same across cultures and time?

2.     Is love the same for both genders?

3.     How does media portray love?

4.     What is Platonic love?

5.     What is love at first sight?

6.     Does media help us understand love?

7.     What are the messages about love in media?

8.     What role does social media play in relationships?

9.     What age are children able to have a serious relationship?

10.  What role should a parent have in a child's relationship?

11.  What are the boundaries for sacrifice in the name of love?

12.  Are the messages about love from Shakespeare valuable today?