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2014 2015 American Literature 

English 11 R

 

 

First Quarter   

Second Quarter

Third Quarter

Fourth Quarter

Week One

Week One

Week One

Week One

Week Two

Week Two

Week Two

Week Two

Week Three

Week Three

Week Three

Week Three

Week Four

Week Four

Week Four

Week Four

Week Five

Week Five

Week Five

Week Five

Week Six

Week Six

Week Six

Week Six

Week Seven

Week Seven

Week Seven

Week Seven

Week Eight

Week Eight

Week Eight

Week Eight

Week Nine

Week Nine

 

Week Nine

Week Ten

Week Ten

 

Week Ten

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quarter One  Week One

 
 

Monday

 

 
 

Tuesday

 

 
 

Wednesday

Sept 3

 

Brainstorm 10 interview questions with open ended "follow ups" to share with the class.

 

YES No
(doesn't count)


YES
ORIGINAL TOPIC QUESTION
ONE WORD ANSWER QUESTION
OPEN ENDED FOLLOW UP
EXAMPLE
What was the last movie you saw?
   EXAMPLE
Did you like it?
EXAMPLE
Why did you like it?

 

 

 

 

Thursday

Sept 4

 

Interviews for class introductions.
Interview a student as assigned using questions developed in class.
Write you response on a separate sheet of paper.
Transfer the essential points to index cards for your introduction--
DO NOT  write all of the information on the index card-- it is only a reference.
 

Friday

Sept 5

 




For a   "C"    complete an effective introduction from your seat.
For a   "B"    complete an effective introduction from the front of the class.
For an "A"  complete an effective introduction from the front of the class and remember to only mention the name of the person at the end of your introduction.









 

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Quarter One  Week Two

 
 

Monday

Sept 8

 

Benchmark Assessment for 11R 

Part IV Critical lens essay.

(TO BE COMPLETED IN CLASS--  IF you are absent... go onto the next section you will work on HERE )
 

Tuesday

Sept 9

 

 

 

 

Benchmark Assessment for 11R 
Part IV  Critical lens essay.


(TO BE COMPLETED IN CLASS--  IF you are absent... go onto the next section you will work on HERE )
 

Wednesday

Sept 10

 

Benchmark Assessment for 11R 
Part III.


(TO BE COMPLETED IN CLASS--  IF you are absent... go onto the next section you will work on HERE )
 

Thursday

Sept 11

 

Complete Parts II, III, and IV

Last chance to turn in Essay (Part IV)

Begin literary terms assignment and complete for HW if not done in class.
We will review Friday


(TO BE COMPLETED IN CLASS--  IF you are absent... go onto the next section you will work on HERE )
 

Friday

Sept 12

 

Listening Passage and review of literary terms assignment. 


If you are done, you have no homework.

H.W. ALL PARTS MUST BE COMPLETED BY MONDAY IF YOU WERE ABSENT THIS WEEK (the assessment is HERE )

 

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Quarter One  Week Three

 
 

Monday

Sept 15

 

Review Regents Results and identify personal goals.

Turn in the completed score sheet distributed in class it counts as Test Grade it will be copied and returned to you:


Multiple choice scores

Score conversion chart

Paragraph Response

Essay  The essay scores are calculated by another English teacher based on an approximation and over 10 years experience with the Regents Exam in 11th grade.








 

Tuesday

Sept 16

 

 TAKE NOTES ON THE SIX STEP QUESTION EXPLORATION PROCESS WE WILL BE USING:  QER 



Copy the Essential Question:

What functions do myths and traditional native American stories serve?



Reading--"World on a Turtles Back"  Orange Textbook page 25

Vote on reading choices 

Do we read together or independently as a group?









 

Wednesday

Sept 17

 


You will begin to work in your challenge groups today as assigned. Groups are designed for educational purposes and are not random. You may be reassigned to another group for educational purposes.  Participation in all group work is required for Participation worth 20% of your grade.


Work together to complete the reading and answer questions 1-6 on page 31 in complete sentences. Select an image (see imagery) from the text to represent visually-- and be able to explain why you selected the image. For credit, you must provide EVIDENCE for any CLAIM you make is an answer--  NOT A FEELING, IMPRESSION, OR OPINION. This is one HW grade.



While the group may discuss the correct answers and share, each individual is expected to keep this assignment in their notebook for future reference.

Prepare to present your E.B.C's  (Evidence Based Claims) and answers Thursday with your group to the class. 




 

Thursday

Sept 18

 






Work together to complete the reading and answer questions 1-6 on page 31 in complete sentences. Select an image (see imagery) from the text to represent visually-- and be able to explain why you selected the image. For credit, you must provide EVIDENCE for any CLAIM you make is an answer--  NOT A FEELING, IMPRESSION, OR OPINION. This is one HW grade.









Chief Joseph  I will Fight No More Forever 

RESPONSE ASSIGNMENT: SELECT ONE TO COMPLETE FOR A HW GRADE OPTIONS Here






 

Friday

Sept 19

 

Use with A Man to Send Rainclouds  Chapter I

 

Chief Joseph  I will Fight No More Forever    Listen: Here

RESPONSE ASSIGNMENT: SELECT ONE TO COMPLETE FOR A HW GRADE OPTIONS Here

Enrichment resources:  Chief Joseph Speaks
Selected Statements and Speeches
by the Nez Percé Chief

Images

Copy the Essential Question for your new QER:

How does conflict arise and resolve when two different cultures meet?

 

http://www.pbs.org/godinamerica/view/

Begin 2:50---  12min  Native American

 

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Quarter One  Week Four

 
 

Monday

Sept  22  

 

 

In your challenge groups, REVIEW the Essential Question

How does conflict arise and resolve when two different cultures meet?

 

 

Recall, we unpacked the essential question we are going to answer-- if you need to look at those notes.  Consider unpacking the supporting main idea questions for your group to present at the end of our exploration.

 

Use the supporting questions to make claims with evidence-- see the  Evidence Based Claim Rubric for how you will be graded.

The text we will use for this assignment:

“The Man to Send Rain Clouds” 

by Leslie Marmon Silko

To better understand the story, complete the two group assigned questions below.  As you make claims from the text support your claims with evidence to share with the class and present then turn in:

 

GROUP 1 GROUP 2 GROUP 3 GROUP 4 GROUP 5
Why is Father Paul an outsider?

How does Silko use External  Conflict?
What are Father Paul's ambitions? Why can't he achieve them?

How does Silko use Internal Conflict?
What is the significance of the fact that these men gather the sheep before tending to their grandfather?

How does Silko use Indirect Characterization?
In what ways is the Native American community shown to be close to nature?

How does Silko use Symbolism?
Why does Louise want holy water sprinkled on Teofilo's body?

How does Silko use Irony?

 

 

Series God in America: 

Begin 2:50---  12min  Native American

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday

Sept 23

 

 

GROUP 1 GROUP 2 GROUP 3 GROUP 4 GROUP 5
Why is Father Paul an outsider?

How does Silko use External  Conflict?
What are Father Paul's ambitions? Why can't he achieve them?

How does Silko use Internal Conflict?
What is the significance of the fact that these men gather the sheep before tending to their grandfather?

How does Silko use Indirect Characterization?
In what ways is the Native American community shown to be close to nature?

How does Silko use Symbolism?
Why does Louise want holy water sprinkled on Teofilo's body?

How does Silko use Irony?

 

Wednesday

Sept 24

 

 

Group Presentations with Evidence Based Claims

Evidence Based Claim Rubric

 

Thursday

Sept 25

 

 

Rosh Hashanah School Closed
 

Friday

Sept 26

 

 

Rosh Hashanah School Closed

 

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Quarter One  Week Five

 
 

Monday

Sept 29

 

Get into new challenge groups (where you challenge yourself to learn something new).  

 

GRAB A TEXTBOOK!

 

 

UNIT:  Colony to Country.

 

Question Exploration Routine  on a separate sheet of paper---

Step 1 -- What is the Critical Question?  

How do collective fears affect a group or individuals?

 

Step 2 -- What are the Key Terms and Explanations (unpack the question)?

Begin with the question, the work we are reading, discussion, and brainstorming to identify vocabulary we can use to explore the topic.

 

 

 

Step 3 -- What are the Supporting Questions and answers?     

 Complex questions (How do collective fears affect a group or individuals? ) may easily become multiple questions as part of our supporting questions in addition to our brainstorming from the key terms:

How do collective fears affect a groups?

How do collective fears affect individuals?

Are there questions that arise as we look at the vocabulary or as we examine the media / literature and even have class discussion??  Leave space to answer these.  Is there more than one question hidden in the essential question?  What resources can we use? Use these questions and answers as paragraphs in any writing assignment you have  (EBC)!

 

 

To answer this question we are going to employ various examples of American Literature as a basis for our evidence based claims.

We begin with "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God" a sermon.

 

In order to understand it in context, we have to have some basic historical knowlege:


Well, take note of the three Puritan Beliefs (textbook page 134-135) and consider the some origins of prejudice and other "interesting" ideas in “The Great Chain of Being” see IMAGE HERE.


Consider The three key Puritan beliefs:
Original Sin


Predestination


The Bible as "Supreme Authority"

 

What kind of government would you expect such a people have? 



OUR FIRST TEXT FOR STUDY AND ANALYSIS:

 


"Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God"


What is the purpose of the text?

How would this speech be delivered?



Define “What is imagery?” – in order to discuss the term as a class and how it helps us understand a text.      



Consider-- What is the setting for the text? 




1. As a group, peruse (read carefully) excerpts (parts) from the speech “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God”  and as a group pick out a different excerpt of powerful imagery for each person in your group. 




2. Each person writes their unique image in the form of a quotation from the text (use quotation marks and cite according the author's last name and page number).




3. Now, 
each member will draw it in a poster for the class as Edward’s audience might imagine it with a “public service announcement" in Edward’s style (as if we lived in a Puritan Theocracy).





Each individual should have a written response that includes the page number, why they picked the paragraph, and an explanation of the imagery.  Write this or attach it to the poster.  Individuals should be prepared to present their work at the end of the period or as time allows.
 

Tools:

Text, this website, discussion, paper and crayons.

 






 

Tuesday

Sept 30

Open House

 Define “imagery?” – in order to discuss the term as a class and how it helps us understand a text.      


Consider- What is the setting a
nd author's purpose for the text? 

1.As a group, peruse (read carefully) excerpts (parts) from the speech Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God”  and as a group pick out a different excerpt of powerful imagery for each person in your group. 

2. Each person writes their unique image in the form of a quotation from the text (use quotation marks and cite according the author's last name and page number  EVIDENCE BASED CLAIMS).

3. Now, 
each member will draw it in a poster for the class as Edward’s audience might imagine it with a “public service announcement" in Edward’s style (as if we lived in a Puritan Theocracy).

Samples: PPLS  Stop   Bite  Fur  Smokey

Each individual should have a written response that includes the page number, why they picked the paragraph, and an explanation of the imagery.  Write this or attach it to the poster.  Individuals should be prepared to present their work at the end of the period or as time allows. 

Tools:

Text, this website, discussion, paper and crayons.

Due Wednesday for H.W.

 

 

Wednesday

Oct 1

 



Puritanical public service announcement assignment is due.





We will prepare to start reading The Crucible.

Reminder Literature Circles Role--- you will meet at the end of each act. 

Your Literature Circles Packet will be collected ate the end of the play after the last meeting.

How can we predict the setting and time period will influence the plot?

Briefly go over / review the introduction on page 163-- What is a crucible? 

When was the play written?

Select parts (on board) for reading-- write your name next to the part you would like to read for participation credit!
Read play as class as teacher models the roles for the first reading and take notes as per your role.      

Literature Circles Role Reminders

Your grade is based on preparation, contribution, as well quality of your assignments as evidenced in the quality and neatness in the completion of you packet, the ability to actually follow the written directions in the packet, observation in class.





 

Thursday

Oct 2

 

 



Reading The Crucible  Act I










 

Friday

Oct 3

 

 

Reading The Crucible  Act I

 

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Quarter One  Week Six

 
 

Monday

Oct 6

 

Reading The Crucible
 

Tuesday

Oct 7

 

Literature Circles on Act I The Crucible -- Decide on new roles for Act II
 

Wednesday

Oct 8

 

Act I & II The Crucible
 

Thursday

Oct 9

 

 

Act I & II The Crucible
 

Friday

Oct 10

 

Meet in computer lab
PERIOD 2--  2120
PERIOD 5--  1102
PERIOD 7--  2120



Work on First Quarter Project (DUE WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 29th)

 

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Quarter One  Week Seven

 
 

Monday

Oct 13

 

School Closed Columbus Day
 

Tuesday

Oct 14

 

Meet in computer lab
PERIOD 2--  2120
PERIOD 5--  1102
PERIOD 7--  2120


Work on First Quarter Project (DUE WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 29th)
 

Wednesday

Oct 15

 

1/2 day
 

Thursday

Oct 16

 

Literature Circles on Act II The Crucible -- Decide on new roles for Act III
 

Friday

Oct 17

 

The Crucible -- Reading Act III

 

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Quarter One  Week Eight

 
 

Monday

Oct 20

 

Meet in computer lab
PERIOD 2--  1102
PERIOD 5--  2118
PERIOD 7--  2118



Work on First Quarter Project (DUE WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 29th)
 

Tuesday

Oct 21

 

Meet in computer lab
1211

Work on First Quarter Project (DUE WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 29th)
 

Wednesday

Oct 22

 

The Crucible -- Act IV
 

Thursday

Oct 23

 

The Crucible View IV
 

Friday

Oct 24

 

11th Grade Benchmark Exam
Work on Literature Circles Packet-- Collected next week  and for use AS PART OF YOUR ASSESSMENT (TEST).  IF YOU ARE NOT PREPARED YOU WILL HAVE NO NOTES FOR THE TEST!
HW- Be able to complete your project for next Wednesday.

 

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Quarter One  Week Nine

 
 

Monday

Oct 27

 

Meet in computer lab
PERIOD 2--  2118
PERIOD 5--  1102
PERIOD 7--  2120

WORK ON SAT

Print  First Quarter Project (DUE WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 29th)
 

Tuesday

Oct 28

 

Meet in computer lab
PERIOD 2--  2118
PERIOD 5--  2118
PERIOD 7--  1211

WORK ON SAT

 First Quarter Project (DUE TOMORROW OCTOBER 29th)
 

Wednesday

Oct 29

 

First Quarter Project DUE


View Act IV.


COMPLETE LITERATURE CIRCLES PACKET DUE FRIDAY.



 
 

Thursday

Oct 30

 

Summative Assessment (TAKE HOME TEST)  Due  at the start of class  November 5--  Answer the Essential Questions in two paragraphs with evidence based claims.  You must include at least one reference to our study of The Crucible.

You may also cite "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God,"  your research of McCarthyism, or the media below.

How do collective fears affect a group or individuals?

1) How do collective fears affect a groups?
2) How do collective fears affect individuals?


Consider for a test grade due Friday
30% question 1
30% question 2
40% EBC  Evidence Based Claims 


View media about the power of fear and a "Crucible" style world complete this worksheet with evidence based claims for extra credit on this test.
 

Friday

Oct 31

 

Summative Assessment (TAKE HOME TEST)  Due  at the start of class  November 5--  Answer the Essential Questions in two paragraphs with evidence based claims.  You must include at least one reference to our study of The Crucible.

You may also cite "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God,"  your research of McCarthyism, or the media below.

How do collective fears affect a group or individuals?

1) How do collective fears affect a groups?
2) How do collective fears affect individuals?


Consider for a test grade due Friday
30% question 1
30% question 2
40% EBC  Evidence Based Claims


View media about the power of fear and a "Crucible" style world complete this worksheet with evidence based claims for extra credit on this test.

 

Back to Top

 

Quarter One  Week Ten

 
 

Monday

Nov 3

 

Summative Assessment (TAKE HOME TEST)  Due at the start of class November 5--  Answer the Essential Questions in two paragraphs with evidence based claims.  You must include at least one reference to our study of The Crucible.

You may also cite "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God,"  your research of McCarthyism, or the media below.

How do collective fears affect a group or individuals?

1) How do collective fears affect a groups?
2) How do collective fears affect individuals?


Consider for a test grade due Friday
30% question 1
30% question 2
40% EBC  Evidence Based Claims


View media about the power of fear and a "Crucible" style world complete this worksheet with evidence based claims for extra credit on this test.
 

Tuesday

Nov 4

 

School Closed
 

Wednesday

Nov 5

 

Summative Assessment (Your TAKE HOME TEST). It is due at start of class.




Grab a textbook and move into your groups.


BEGIN NEW UNIT and QER:













Today we begin a unit with a focus on the Harlem Renaissance. Before we go deeper into our exploration of that topic we must consider the following essential question:

Given the obstacles that some Americans have to overcome, do obstacles, time, or cultural identity change the American Dream?

 

QUESTION EXPLORATION

Step 1 -- What is the Critical Question?

•Before we can understand a concept we must remember it.

 

 

 

Step 2 -- What are the Key Terms and explanations?

•Before we can conceptualize we must understand it

 

The American Dream

Culture

Identity

Obstacle

 

 

 

Step 3 -- What are the Supporting Questions and Answers (read/research)?

•Before we can apply it we must question (explore) it.

BRAINSTORM QUESTIONS

Who has to overcome obstacles?

What is the American Dream?

What is cultural identity?

What effect does the time period have?

How does cultural identity affect the American Dream?

Why do people from other countries immigrate to America?

When we talk about "The American Dream", what do we mean?

What are some of the obstacles to achieving the American Dream?

Which groups of people have had trouble attaining "The American Dream"? There are a variety of acceptable responses to this question. E.g. Native Americans, Irish Americans, African Americans, Chinese Americans, and Japanese Americans, as well as the poor and women. 

Given the obstacles that some Americans have to overcome, what makes the American Dream appealing?

TO EXPLORE ANSWERS:

Read the following poems. Compare and contrast the poems in light of the essential question and any supporting questions you develop. You may choose to use a Venn Diagram.

For each poem answer the following:

What is the tone of each poem? How do they compare?

What kinds of images does each poet use?

What effect does the presence or absence of rhyme have?

What are the main similarities in terms of the themes or ideas between the two poems?

Are there more differences or similarities?

 

Group 1           “Ballad of Birmingham” (here) page 619  and "Harlem"(here) page 926

Group 2          "Harlem" (here)  and "I Sit and Look Out" (here) page 399

Group 3          “Song of Myself" (Stanza 1 here )  page 400 and "I too" (here) page 925

Group 4          “I Hear America Singing" (here) page 397 and "I too"  (here) page 925 

Group 5           “I Am Joquin” (here)page 309 and "I Sit and Look Out" (here) page 399

   

 

 

 

Step 4 -- What is the Main Idea answer for the Critical Question?

•Before we can evaluate its impact we must have analyzed it.

After reading, discuss possible answers with your group to share with the class.

(Based on our readings of these poems, do obstacles, time or cultural identity change the American Dream?)

 

 

 

Step 5 -- How can connect the Main Idea to the world?

•Before we can create and synthesize we must have remembered, understood, applied, and analyzed it.

(Are there any examples of how time or cultural identity has affected the American Dream?)

 

 

 

 

Step 6 -- Is there an Overall Idea? Is there a real-world use?

(Based on our evidence (reading and research so far), what claims can we make about the relationship between obstacles to attaining the dream and how the American Dream might change?)

Given the obstacles that some Americans have to overcome, do obstacles, time, or cultural identity change the American Dream?





Friday is the last day to turn in work for the first quarter.  Work that is late, is incomplete, or is of minimal effort and quality will suffer a reduction of grade.

 

Thursday

Nov 6

 



Complete the QER and prepare to use it to create a poem.

Complete your list based on the poems you were assigned and turn this in at the end of the period:

Dreams

Obstacles


 


 


 


 


 


On a separate sheet of paper complete your list based on your own dreams and goals for use in your poetry assignment:

Dreams

Obstacles


 


 


 


 


 







What is the American Dream-- to you? 

Consider all of the elements that go into our goals and dreams... as well as the influence of time.

Consider the following:
Why do people from other countries immigrate to America?

When we talk about "The American Dream", what do we mean?
What are some of the obstacles to achieving the American Dream?
Which groups of people have had trouble attaining "The American Dream"?

Write a poem about the American Dream  or a lost dream in the style of Whitman
using the literary devices such a imagery, repetition, free verse, and  the theme of the American Dream -- NO RHYME. (counts as two HW grades due Friday).





STEP 1     Brainstorm  include the brainstorm (prewriting) -- your own dreams and obstacles.

STEP 2     Write the poem-- incorporate the four  literary devices and underline them.  Identify the device -- next to your use of it in parentheses .





Poem is due Friday.


Friday is the last day to turn in work for the first quarter.  Work that is late, is incomplete, or is of minimal effort and quality will suffer a reduction of grade.
 

Friday

Nov 7

 


Complete Poem Assignment assigned Thursday.
Langston Hughes & the Harlem Renaissance: Crash Course Literature 215   HERE

Poem is due .

This is the last day to turn in work for the first quarter.  Work that is late, is incomplete, or is of minimal effort and quality will suffer a reduction of grade.


 

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Quarter Two  Week One

 
 

Monday

Nov 10

 

Go to Library bring ID or books you owe to pick up A Raisin in the Sun -- Bring to class daily each day after as it counts as HW grade.







Given the obstacles that some Americans have to overcome, do obstacles, time, or cultural identity change the American Dream?








In honor of Veteran's Day consider the following perspectives:


How to talk to veterans about the war

Wes Moore joined the US Army to pay for college, but the experience became core to who he is. In this heartfelt talk, the paratrooper and captain—who went on to write "The Other Wes Moore"—explains the shock of returning home from Afghanistan. He shares the single phrase he heard from civilians on repeat, and shows why it's just not sufficient. It's a call for all of us to ask veterans to tell their stories — and listen.



 

Tuesday

Nov 11

 

Veteran's Day School is Closed
 

Wednesday

Nov 12

 

 

Given the obstacles that some Americans have to overcome, do obstacles, time, or cultural identity change the American Dream?

 

 

Reading A Raisin in the Sun---   Begin reading log where you keep a  Character Analysis Chart so that you can answer the following:

 

How is the American Dream expressed in each member of the Younger family: Walter, Ruth, Lena (Mama), and Beneatha?

1) Dreams and Goals

2) Obstacles

3) Racism and Sexism

 

Reading A RAISIN IN THE SUN---  let's take parts and begin reading!

 

Thursday

Nov 13

 

Reading A Raisin in the Sun---   Begin reading log where you keep a  Character Analysis Chart so that you can answer the following:

 

How is the American Dream expressed in each member of the Younger family: Walter, Ruth, Lena (Mama), and Beneatha?

1) Dreams and Goals

2) Obstacles

3) Racism and Sexism

 

Reading A RAISIN IN THE SUN---  let's take parts and begin reading!

 

Friday

Nov 14

 


Given the obstacles that some Americans have to overcome, do obstacles, time, or cultural identity change the American Dream?




How was the American Dream perceived in the 1950s?


As we read consider how it compares to today’s dreams.

What messages in this clip  A Word to the Wives (1955)  ?

What do you notice in this Clip  1952 Day In The Life Of A 1950's Small Town ?

Try one of these: Coronet Instructional Films

 

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Quarter Two  Week Two

 
 

Monday

Nov 17

 

Given the obstacles that some Americans have to overcome, do obstacles, time, or cultural identity change the American Dream?




How was the American Dream perceived in the 1950s?


As we read consider how it compares to today’s dreams.

What messages in this clip  A Word to the Wives (1955)  ?

What do you notice in this Clip  1952 Day In The Life Of A 1950's Small Town ?

Try one of these: Coronet Instructional Films

 

Reading A Raisin in the Sun---   Continue reading log where you keep a  Character Analysis Chart so that you can answer the following:

 

How is the American Dream expressed in each member of the Younger family: Walter, Ruth, Lena (Mama), and Beneatha?

1) Dreams and Goals

2) Obstacles

3) Racism and Sexism

 

Reading A RAISIN IN THE SUN---  let's take parts and begin reading!

 

Tuesday

Nov 18

 

 

TEXT: Charlotte Watson Sherman, From "Emerald City: Third & Pike," in Killing Color (fiction)

 

In the short story, "Emerald City: Third & Pike" (see page 127 in play) a woman shares what happened to her dream.  Use EBC (a quotation as evidence) for each answer to explain  the basis of your claim.

 

 

1.       How is the corner of Third and Pike described? 

 

2.       What does Oya say what of her family?

 

3.       What draws the narrator into conversation with Oya?

 

4.       What is it that offends the narrator?

 

5.       How does Oya’s dream (explain it) make her famous?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading A Raisin in the Sun---   Continue reading log where you keep a  Character Analysis Chart so that you can answer the following:

 

How is the American Dream expressed in each member of the Younger family: Walter, Ruth, Lena (Mama), and Beneatha?

1) Dreams and Goals

2) Obstacles

3) Racism and Sexism

 

Reading A RAISIN IN THE SUN---  le's take parts and begin reading!

 

Wednesday

Nov 19

 

James Howard Kunstler: The ghastly tragedy of the suburbs





ACT III



Reading A Raisin in the Sun---   Continue reading log where you keep a  Character Analysis Chart so that you can answer the following:

 

How is the American Dream expressed in each member of the Younger family: Walter, Ruth, Lena (Mama), and Beneatha?

1) Dreams and Goals

2) Obstacles

3) Racism and Sexism

 

Reading A RAISIN IN THE SUN---  let's take parts and begin reading!

 

Thursday

Nov 20

 

Reading A Raisin in the Sun---   Continue reading log where you keep a  Character Analysis Chart so that you can answer the following:

Reading A RAISIN IN THE SUN---  let's take parts and begin reading!

 

 

 

Compare the following in a Venn Diagram:

Page 78 +


Walter Lee

"... and finally I sat down on the curb at Thirty-ninth and South Parkway and I just sat
 ..."


Harlem Harlem By Langston Hughes 1902–1967 Langston Hughes



    What happens to a dream deferred?       
    Does it dry up       
    like a raisin in the sun?       
    Or fester like a sore—       
    And then run?       
    Does it stink like rotten meat?       
    Or crust and sugar over—       
    like a syrupy sweet?       
    Maybe it just sags       
    like a heavy load.      
    Or does it explode?
Page 78 +


And
Oya


"Emerald City: Third & Pike"











Differences Similarities Differences
     
     
     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Friday

Nov 21

 

Reading A Raisin in the Sun---   Continue reading log where you keep a  Character Analysis Chart so that you can answer the following:

 

How is the American Dream expressed in each member of the Younger family: Walter, Ruth, Lena (Mama), and Beneatha?

1) Dreams and Goals

2) Obstacles

3) Racism and Sexism

 

Reading A RAISIN IN THE SUN---  let's take parts and begin reading!

 

Compare the following in a Venn Diagram:

Page 78 +


Walter Lee

"... and finally I sat down on the curb at Thirty-ninth and South Parkway and I just sat
 ..."


Harlem Harlem By Langston Hughes 1902–1967 Langston Hughes



    What happens to a dream deferred?       
    Does it dry up       
    like a raisin in the sun?       
    Or fester like a sore—       
    And then run?       
    Does it stink like rotten meat?       
    Or crust and sugar over—       
    like a syrupy sweet?       
    Maybe it just sags       
    like a heavy load.      
    Or does it explode?
Page 78 +


And
Oya


"Emerald City: Third & Pike"











Differences Similarities Differences
     
     
     

 

 

 

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Quarter Two  Week Three

 
 

Monday

Nov 24

 



Given the obstacles that some Americans have to overcome, do obstacles, time, or cultural identity change the American Dream?


Complete your--

Character Analysis Chart

so that you can answer the following with EBC:

 

How is the American Dream expressed in each member of the Younger family: Walter, Ruth, Lena (Mama), and Beneatha?

1) Dreams and Goals

2) Obstacles

3) Racism and Sexism




Complete QER using the poetry we have studied, the short story "Emerald City: Third & Pike," and A Raisin in the Sun.



YOU MAY USE YOUR NOTES FOR THE QUIZ TUESDAY




 

Tuesday

Nov 25

 

Given the obstacles that some Americans have to overcome, do obstacles, time, or cultural identity change the American Dream?











A Raisin in the Sun



QUIZ



Given the events in Ferguson, write a paragraph connecting the American Dream or its obstacles to A Raisin in the Sun or those current events-- be sure to provide evidence for any claim you make.


























 

Wednesday

Nov 26

 

Thanksgiving Break
 

Thursday

Nov 27

 

Thanksgiving Break
 

Friday

Nov 28

 

Thanksgiving Break

 

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Quarter Two  Week Four

 
 

Monday

Dec 1

 

Period 2 1102
Period 5 2118
Period 7 2118

Part one of your 2nd Q Project

This is the assignment (print it here) :

 

How do I start???

For example, imagine that I selected Walter Lee Younger.   I select which dimensions of his life I would like to research. I then have to research the life he had in Chicago from 1951-1961 and print out resources as evidence to incorporate into my poster.   Then I research the conditions he would face in Chicago during the last decade and print out my evidence for the poster.  Then  identify similarities and differences for your presentation.  On next Thursday, assemble the poster for your presentation.  On Friday, give your presentation.

 

Chicago South Side of 2000-TODAY

vs.

Chicago's South Side 1950-1960's 

 

Work alone or with no more than one other person and select one of the main characters (including Travis and Asagai).

 

You will research both historical(1950's) and modern Chicago (from 2000's to today) using their unique perspective in relation to EACH of the seven dimensions below:

1 Dreams, Hopes, and Plans (includes education, employment etc.)
2 Race and Pride (includes Racism and Segregation)
3 Family and Gender  Roles / Prejudice (includes sexism)
4 Poverty Suffering Dissatisfaction (includes employment statistics and opportunities)     
5 The Home and the "White Picket Fence" (define the "American Dream")
6 Choices and Sacrifice (includes one generation sacrificing for the next)
7 Religion, Giving, Social Work, Teaching

 

You will create a poster for classroom display using evidence for your claims and a works cited page.  You may use text or images with explanations.

 

Describe each character so that you can use them in relation to the seven dimensions below.

Here is the interactive assignment page.

 

 

Complete the poster correctly with no errors and citation for the possible grade of "C."

Complete the above, have the poster prepared neatly and on time with your works cited page following the MLA format for the possible grade of "B."

Complete all of the above and deliver a presentation using your poster and sharing with the class what you learned about the Chicago of Lorraine Hansberry and of America today for a possible "A."

I will provide poster paper and glue sticks for us to assemble our research and then for you to present next week -- be balanced in your work
 

Accuracy and neatness of poster 25%,

Research on 1950's Chicago 25%, 

Research of today's Chicago 25%

Your presentation to the class 25%. 

 

Here is the interactive assignment page.

 



 

Tuesday

Dec 2

 

Period 2 1211
Period 5 1211
Period 7 1211

See Monday

Here is the interactive assignment page.

 


 

Wednesday

Dec 3

 

Period 2 1211
Period 5 1211
Period 7 1211


See Monday

Here is the interactive assignment page.

Did you turn in the quiz below?

I will take it up to Friday:

Given the events in Ferguson, write a paragraph connecting the American Dream or its obstacles to A Raisin in the Sun or those current events-- be sure to provide evidence for any claim you make.


 

Thursday

Dec 4

 

Literary "Elephants" for Regents Review:

Sign up for a literary element (no class duplicates), then through the textbook, research it and why authors might use it to develop an aspect of their writing and lastly, provide an example.

Then, transfer what you learned to a "Literary Elephant" poster for classroom display. 
Below the "elephant," clearly write the element,  define it in the body,  then most importantly--  

...in the space provided write how it is used and give an example.
Look up the term in the back of the textbook where it is indexed as well as for where it is defined.

Be creative and use color or additional drawing to help us remember the way the "elephant" is used by writers.
Be sure to put your name on your elephant!

 

Friday

Dec 5

 



Present your Literary "Elephants" for Regents Review to the class.

Students are to collaborate and brainstorm on question 28 (the Regents Exam handout).

 

They must identify four works of literature with titles and authors as well as literary devices the author used to develop the works.

 

This collaboration will have to be attached the essay.  It will be typed in the computer lab next Wednesday and Thursday.

 

This is NOT a group essay--- just a group collaboration.

 

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Quarter Two  Week Five

 
 

Monday

Dec 8

 

Period 2 2120
Period 5 2118
Period 7 1211


Complete "The Chicago" Project  and bring materials to assemble in class on Thursday.  I will bring some poster paper, crayons, scissors, and glue sticks--  you bring the facts.

Here is the interactive assignment page.

On Thursday, assemble the poster for your presentation.  On Friday, give your presentation.




















 

Tuesday

Dec 9

 

Period 2 2120
Period 5 2118
Period 7 1211


Due at the end of class Wednesday 17th.

COMPLETE THE FOLLOWING (two class periods is more time than you will have on the Regents Exam):

 

Your Task:
Write a critical essay in which you discuss two works of literature you have read from the particular perspective of the statement that is provided for you in the Critical Lens. In your essay, provide a valid interpretation of the statement, agree or disagree with the statement as you have interpreted it, and support your opinion using specific references to appropriate literary elements from the two works.

Critical Lens:
“…ignorance is never better than knowledge.”
— Laura Fermi
Atoms in the Family, 1954


Guidelines:
Be sure to • Provide a valid interpretation of the critical lens that clearly establishes the
criteria for analysis • Indicate whether you agree or disagree with the statement as you have
interpreted it • Choose two works you have read that you believe best support your opinion
• Use the criteria suggested by the critical lens to analyze the works you have chosen • Avoid plot summary. Instead, use specific references to appropriate literary elements (for example: theme, characterization, setting, point of view) to develop your analysis • Organize your ideas in a unified and coherent manner • Specify the titles and authors of the literature you choose • Follow the conventions of standard written English



On Thursday, assemble the poster for your presentation.  On Friday, give your presentation.

 

Wednesday

Dec 10

 

Period 2 1211
Period 5 1211
Period 7 1211



Type the following essay: 

Due at the end of class.

Your Task:
Write a critical essay in which you discuss two works of literature you have read from the particular perspective of the statement that is provided for you in the Critical Lens. In your essay, provide a valid interpretation of the statement, agree or disagree with the statement as you have interpreted it, and support your opinion using specific references to appropriate literary elements from the two works.

Critical Lens:
“…ignorance is never better than knowledge.”
— Laura Fermi
Atoms in the Family, 1954


Guidelines:
Be sure to • Provide a valid interpretation of the critical lens that clearly establishes the
criteria for analysis • Indicate whether you agree or disagree with the statement as you have
interpreted it • Choose two works you have read that you believe best support your opinion
• Use the criteria suggested by the critical lens to analyze the works you have chosen • Avoid plot summary. Instead, use specific references to appropriate literary elements (for example: theme, characterization, setting, point of view) to develop your analysis • Organize your ideas in a unified and coherent manner • Specify the titles and authors of the literature you choose • Follow the conventions of standard written English



On Thursday, assemble the poster for your presentation.  On Friday, give your presentation.
 

Thursday

Dec 11

 

THE REGENTS EXAM REQUIRES YOU TO DISCUSS THE WAY THE AUTHOR USES LITERARY DEVICES.  THE FOLLOWING IS AN EXERCISE IN WRITING THIS WAY WITH EVIDENCE BASED CLAIMS.

Literary "Elephants" for Regents Review:

Sign up for a literary element (no class duplicates), then through the textbook, research it and why authors might use it to develop an aspect of their writing and lastly, provide an example.

Then, transfer what you learned to a "Literary Elephant" poster for classroom display. 
Below the "elephant," clearly write the element,  define it in the body,  then most importantly--  

...in the space provided write how it is used and give an example.
Look up the term in the back of the textbook where it is indexed as well as for where it is defined.


Be creative and use color or additional drawing to help us remember the way the "elephant" is used by writers.
Be sure to put your name on your elephant!

 

Friday

Dec 12

 

Literary "Elephants" for Regents Review:

Sign up for a literary element (no class duplicates), then through the textbook, research it and why authors might use it to develop an aspect of their writing and lastly, provide an example.

Then, transfer what you learned to a "Literary Elephant" poster for classroom display. 
Below the "elephant," clearly write the element,  define it in the body,  then most importantly--  

...in the space provided write how it is used and give an example.
Look up the term in the back of the textbook where it is indexed as well as for where it is defined.


Be creative and use color or additional drawing to help us remember the way the "elephant" is used by writers.
Be sure to put your name on your elephant!

 

 

 

 

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Quarter Two  Week Six

 
 

Monday

Dec 15

 

Chicago project presentations
Happy Holidays--    (Chanukah begins today).
 

Tuesday

Dec 16

 

Due at the end of class Wednesday 17th.

COMPLETE THE FOLLOWING (two class periods is more time than you will have on the Regents Exam):

 

Your Task:
Write a critical essay in which you discuss two works of literature you have read from the particular perspective of the statement that is provided for you in the Critical Lens. In your essay, provide a valid interpretation of the statement, agree or disagree with the statement as you have interpreted it, and support your opinion using specific references to appropriate literary elements from the two works.

Critical Lens:
“…ignorance is never better than knowledge.”
— Laura Fermi
Atoms in the Family, 1954


Guidelines:
Be sure to • Provide a valid interpretation of the critical lens that clearly establishes the
criteria for analysis • Indicate whether you agree or disagree with the statement as you have
interpreted it • Choose two works you have read that you believe best support your opinion
• Use the criteria suggested by the critical lens to analyze the works you have chosen • Avoid plot summary. Instead, use specific references to appropriate literary elements (for example: theme, characterization, setting, point of view) to develop your analysis • Organize your ideas in a unified and coherent manner • Specify the titles and authors of the literature you choose • Follow the conventions of standard written English







Meet in computer lab.




 

Wednesday

Dec 17

 

Type your critical lens.  Double space.  If handwritten, edit and rewrite skipping lines for comment and review.


Presentations and UNDERLINE the "Literary Elements"  and how the author used them in your essay.


Circle Your Interpretation of the Quote.


Be prepared to review with Mr. G





 

Thursday

Dec 18

 

Counseling Presentation PSAT

















 

Friday

Dec 19

 

As part of our preparation for the Regents Exam, we are going to ask the essential question-- "How do authors in diverse traditions share the literary elements of characterization and symbolism?"

I am distributing construction paper. 
Fold your construction paper as shown to make strips of about 1.5 to 2 inches wide.

At this time of year there is one piece of literature that is ideal for use on the critical lens essay because of its prevalence in media as well as familiarity A Christmas CarolIn class, notes on the reasons this text is awesome to use on the Critical Lens portion of the Regents Exam.  If you are absent you may read the text here A Christmas Carol.  Here are 23 versions of A Christmas Carol  Why is it so popular?


If you have been given          
white
, gold,         or green       you are tracking literary elements from the following list and a brief example from the text.

Do your best to find the following as each is present = Symbolism, Personification, Suspense, Foreshadowing, Flashback, Allusion, Metaphor, Simile, Epiphany, Dialogue, Imagery, Narrator.  



If you have any other color you are tracking characteristics of Ebenezer, provide brief evidence from the text.   

Indicate if the characteristic is positive or negative with a + sign or – sign.

When you have filled your paper you are ready for the last step we will do on NEXT WEEK.


Today we will explore the role of symbolism in dynamic and static characterization (for use on the NYS ELA Exam).  

Daily Journal- Is Walter a static or dynamic character?

Consider excerpts from  A Christmas Carol.


Continue to track your literary elements:
Consider Scrooge's own words:

``Are there no prisons?'' asked Scrooge.

``Plenty of prisons,'' said the gentleman, laying down the pen again.

``And the Union workhouses?'' demanded Scrooge. ``Are they still in operation?''

``They are. Still,'' returned the gentleman, `` I wish I could say they were not.''

``The Treadmill and the Poor Law are in full vigour, then?'' said Scrooge.

``Both very busy, sir.''

``Oh! I was afraid, from what you said at first, that something had occurred to stop them in their useful course,'' said Scrooge. ``I'm very glad to hear it.'' .... ``I wish to be left alone,'' said Scrooge. ``Since you ask me what I wish, gentlemen, that is my answer. I don't make merry myself at Christmas and I can't afford to make idle people merry. I help to support the establishments I have mentioned: they cost enough: and those who are badly off must go there.''

``Many can't go there; and many would rather die.''

``If they would rather die,'' said Scrooge, ``they had better do it, and decrease the surplus population. Besides -- excuse me -- I don't know that.''

``But you might know it,'' observed the gentleman.

``It's not my business,'' Scrooge returned. ``It's enough for a man to understand his own business, and not to interfere with other people's. Mine occupies me constantly. Good afternoon, gentlemen!''

RECALL: What are Walters words that are similar?

 

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Quarter Two  Week Seven

 
 

Monday

Dec 22

 

Regents Review
 

Tuesday

Dec 23

 

Regents Review
 

Wednesday

 

 

Winter Recess School Closed to January 5 2015

 

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Quarter Two  Week Eight

 
 

Monday

Jan 5

 

Essay Due


Regents Review-- Second Quarter Project Distributed in class.


Copy HERE


Here is and archive of old tests:
http://www.nysedregents.org/comprehensiveenglish/



Question 28 sample papers and peer review   HERE

 

Tuesday

Jan 6

 

Regents Review-- Second Quarter Project


Copy HERE


Here is and archive of old tests:
http://www.nysedregents.org/comprehensiveenglish/


Question 28 sample papers and peer review   HERE





 

Wednesday

Jan 7

 

Regents Review-- Second Quarter Project


Copy HERE


Here is and archive of old tests:
http://www.nysedregents.org/comprehensiveenglish/




Questions 26 and 27

Scoring Key and Rating for 26 and 27 Here

Question 28 sample papers and peer review   HERE


 

Thursday

Jan 8

 

Regents Review-- Second Quarter Project




LISTENING STRATEGIES Next Week





Copy HERE


Here is and archive of old tests:
http://www.nysedregents.org/comprehensiveenglish/




Questions 26 and 27

Scoring Key and Rating for 26 and 27 Here

Question 28 sample papers and peer review   HERE
 

Friday

Jan 9

 

Regents Review-- Second Quarter Project



Questions 26 and 27

Scoring Key and Rating for 26 and 27 Here

Question 28 sample papers and peer review   HERE

 

Back to Top

 

Quarter Two  Week Nine

 
 

Monday

Jan 12

 

8
Regents Review-- Second Quarter Project


Copy HERE


Here is and archive of old tests:
http://www.nysedregents.org/comprehensiveenglish/




Questions 26 and 27

Scoring Key and Rating for 26 and 27 Here

Question 28 sample papers and peer review   HERE
 

Tuesday

Jan 13

 

7
Regents Review-- Second Quarter Project


Copy HERE


Here is and archive of old tests:
http://www.nysedregents.org/comprehensiveenglish/




Questions 26 and 27

Scoring Key and Rating for 26 and 27 Here

Question 28 sample papers and peer review   HERE
 

Wednesday

Jan 14

 

6
Regents Review-- Second Quarter Project


Copy HERE


Here is and archive of old tests:
http://www.nysedregents.org/comprehensiveenglish/




Questions 26 and 27

Scoring Key and Rating for 26 and 27 Here

Question 28 sample papers and peer review   HERE




Peer Review of paragraphs



Re-write paragraphs as needed.
Be prepared to turn in "final drafts" Thursday with Essay

DONE?

Complete Multiple Choice questions and interpret the list of critical lens examples Due Friday.






 

Thursday

Jan 15

 

5



Regents Review-- Second Quarter Project


Regents Review: Poetic Devices / "You" in POEMS / Controlling Idea and development of lit devices.

This is worth three HW assignments due at the end of the period FRIDAY.










Copy HERE


Here is and archive of old tests:
http://www.nysedregents.org/comprehensiveenglish/




Questions 26 and 27

Scoring Key and Rating for 26 and 27 Here

Question 28 sample papers and peer review   HERE









Be prepared to turn in "final drafts" TODAY with Essay and Peer Review Sheet.

PEER EDITORS MUST SIGN OFF ON YOUR FINAL DRAFT OR YOU LOSE CREDIT.













 

Friday

Jan 16

 

4

Regents Review-- Second Quarter Project




Regents Review: Poetic Devices / "You" /Controlling Idea

This is worth three HW assignments due at the end of the period.


















Copy HERE


Here is and archive of old tests:
http://www.nysedregents.org/comprehensiveenglish/




Questions 26 and 27

Scoring Key and Rating for 26 and 27 Here

Question 28 sample papers and peer review   HERE





THE LISTENING SECTION
















 

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Quarter Two  Week Ten

 
 

Monday

Jan 19

 

Dr. Martin Luther King's Birthday School Closed
 

Tuesday

Jan 20

 

"I have a Dream"


1-- Parallel to the famous refrain that appears toward the end of his speech (and which serves as its title) is an anaphora in the third paragraph. (An anaphora is the repetition of the same word or phrase at the beginning of successive clauses.) Identify this early refrain.
(a) Let freedom ring
(b) One hundred years later
(c) We can never be satisfied
(d) I have a dream
(e) Five score years ago


2-- (beginning "Five score years ago . . ."), which extended metaphor does Dr. King introduce?
(a) life as a journey
(b) highs (mountains) and lows (valleys)
(c) life as a dream
(d) light (day) and darkness (night)
(e) life as a daydreamer’s doodles on a sheet of paper


3-- Dr. King uses an analogy to illustrate America’s broken promise of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness to “her citizens of color.” (An analogy is a case of reasoning or arguing from parallel cases.) What is this analogy?
(a) a promissory note--a check that has come back marked “insufficient funds”
(b) a dark empty well with a bottomless bucket tied to a frayed rope
(c) a crossroads in a dark forest
(d) a vast stretch of sand occasionally interrupted by lakes--which prove to be illusions
(e) a recurrent nightmare

4-- By linking the occasion of his speech to the Emancipation Proclamation and by using biblical language (reminding listeners that he is a minister), King defines his personal authority, thus helping to establish
(a) a new church in Washington, D.C.
(b) his ethos or ethical appeal
(c) a much needed distraction from the more serious parts of the speech
(d) an excuse for giving a lengthy history


5-- "The marvelous new militancy . . ."), Dr. King says that "many of our white brothers . . . have come to realize that their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom." Define the adverb inextricably.
(a) unable to be excused or pardoned
(b) unable to be separated or untied
(c) unable to be solved or explained
(d) carefully or thoughtfully
(e) painfully or harshly

6-- (beginning "I am not unmindful . . .), Dr. King addresses those in the audience who have been unjustly imprisoned and who have been "battered by . . . police brutality." What advice does Dr. King offer to these people?
(a) seek revenge for the way you have been mistreated
(b) succumb to despair
(c) return home and continue to work for justice
(d) recruit lawyers and sue your local police departments
(e) pray that God will forgive those who persecuted you

7-- beginning with the now-famous phrase "I have a dream," Dr. King mentions certain members of his own family. Which family members does he refer to?
(a) his mother and father
(b) his sister, Christine, and his brother, Alfred
(c) his grandparents and great-grandparents
(d) his four little children
(e) his wife, Coretta Scott King

8-- Toward the end of his speech, Dr. King delivers a patriotic appeal by
(a) unfurling an American flag
(b) quoting “My country, ‘tis of thee . . ..”
(c) reciting the Pledge of Allegiance
(d) singing “America, the Beautiful”
(e) leading the audience in a stirring rendition of “The Star-Spangled Banner”

9-- At the end of his speech, Dr. King repeatedly calls out, "Let freedom ring." Which one of the following locations does he not name in this part of the speech?
(a) the Adirondack Mountains of upstate New York
(b) Lookout Mountain of Tennessee
(c) the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania
(d) the snowcapped Rockies of Colorado
(e) Stone Mountain of Georgia
 

Wednesday

Jan 21

 

2






















 

Thursday

Jan 22

 

1














 

Friday

Jan 23

 














(d) light (day) and darkness (night)
(b) One hundred years later
(a) a promissory note--a check that has come back marked “insufficient funds”
(b) his ethos or ethical appeal
(b) unable to be separated or untied
(c) return home and continue to work for justice
(d) his four little children
(b) quoting “My country, ‘tis of thee . . ..”
(a) the Adirondack Mountains of upstate New York
 






REGENTS EXAM IS MONDAY







 

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Monday

Jan 26

 

TESTING
 

Tuesday

Jan 27

 

TESTING
 

Wednesday

Jan 28

 

TESTING
 

Thursday

Jan 29

 

TESTING
 

Friday

Jan 30

 

 

Love connection!  Walt and Emily!

 

 

 

 

Back to Top

Quarter Three  Week One

 

 
 

Monday

Feb 2

 

Love Connection Assignment!   (3HW grades due Wednesday)
 

Tuesday

Feb 3

 

Love Connection Assignment!   (3HW grades due Wednesday)
 

Wednesday

Feb 4

 

Love Connection Assignment!   (3HW grades due TODAY for presentation)
 

Thursday

Feb 5

 

Third Quarter Project

Complete this and submit on March 6th at the start of class.

Today, complete a QER (Question Exploration Routine) on the following essential question using class resources [your object as a 21st century learner is to try NOT to rely on Mr. G]


How do I enter and win the MOST RECENT Walt Whitman Birthplace Association Annual Poetry Contest   for my Third Quarter Project Grade? 
 

READ ALL OF THE INSTRUCTIONS --on all pages!



1 How many people may work together to complete the QER? students decide!


2 How many people to submit a completed QER for a grade?  Each and everyone!


3 Can we use the classroom Computer? Yes-- take turns and share what you are doing with the class!


4 Can we use the class textbook? Yes!


5 Are we using the computer lab?  YES!  ...  how can you find out without asking?


6 MOST IMPORTANTLY -- Are there special conditions for the project that are not part of the contest rules? Yes!    DETAILS   Click here
   



Complete this and submit on March 6th at the start of class.


FROM THE OFFICIAL CONTEST:

Walt Whitman Birthplace State Historic Site & Interpretive Center

 

246 Old Walt Whitman Road, Huntington Station, NY 11746

 

phone: 631-427-5240 || fax: 631-427-5247


 

TWENTY-NINTH ANNUAL POETRY CONTEST

Theme Announcement & Contest Guidelines


 

Theme:          voice of the elements

Contest: Become the poetic voice of Earth, Wind, Water or Fire

 

Walt Whitman often celebrated the elements of nature in their many shapes and forms.  In his poem, The Voice of the Rain, Whitman translates the words of the rain:

 

And who art thou?  said I to the soft-falling shower,

Which, strange to tell, gave me an answer, as here translated:

I am the Poem of Earth, said the voice of the rain,

Eternal I rise impalpable out of the land and the bottomless sea,

Upward to heaven, whence, vaguely form’d, altogether changed, and yet the same,

I descend to lave the drouths, atomies, dust-layers of the globe,

And all that in them without me were seeds only, latent, unborn;

And forever, by day and night, I give back life to my own origin, and make pure and beautify it;

(For song, issuing from its birth-place, after fulfilment, wandering,

Reck’d or unreck’d, duly with love returns.)

Walt Whitman                         (1885, 1888-89)

 

For this year’s contest, you should become the voice, or speak the words, of one of the four elements of nature: Earth, Wind, Water or Fire.  The elements take many forms.  For instance, the Wind may exist as a breeze, a waft, a gale, a tempest, an ill-wind, a tornado, etc.  The Earth could be a continent, an island, a mountain, an acre of arid soil, the bottom of the sea, etc.  Try to capture the spirit of one form and speak for it.  Become the element, and experience its personality, its wishes and desires.  What are its dreams, secrets, and/or fears?  What does it know and do best?  Why is it speaking?

In the poem above, Whitman follows the rain in its travels from the land and sea to heaven and back.  Read his poem aloud.  Talk about it in class.  What is the rain saying?  What is meant by the last two lines?  Why does Whitman use parentheses?  What is this poem about?  Notice Whitman’s vocabulary and unusual words.  Try and speak poetically in the tone of your element and use descriptive words to reflect its essence; rely on verbs and nouns, in addition to adjectives, to convey emotion and description.

Read other Whitman poems, such as: Earth, My Likeness; Proud Music of the Storm; and Roots and Leaves Themselves Alone.  Notice Whitman’s use of alliteration, assonance, simile and metaphor to enlarge the image and theme.  Find the rhythm in your element and reproduce it in your poem.  And now, let the elements speak!

Good luck!

 

In order to write this poem, you will need to think of the things of this world that make you joyful.  Look and listen to those around you. Like Whitman, consider the many people, places, activities, etc. in your everyday life.

Use Whitman’s technique of detailed descriptions and use of the senses to compose your poem.  Include some or all of your senses: see, smell, taste, touch, hear.  Remember to use images, similes and metaphors to show us your ideas.  Your poem should employ a longer line, like those of Whitman.  Search for unusual words and craft them into poetics of sounds, repeating letters for alliteration and vowels for assonance.  Try to avoid end rhymes, although slant or internal rhymes may be used.

With this swirl of involvement and observation, your writing will capture a world in itself.

 

Good luck! 

 

Individual poems, individual and class anthologies, multi-media

Contest rules mailed to you in early January 2015

Reservations & information:

Carolyn, Education Coordinator, 631-427-5240, ext. 113

educator@waltwhitman.org This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

THE WALT WHITMAN BIRTHPLACE ASSOCIATION IS PROUD TO PRESENT ITS TWENTY-NINTH ANNUAL POETRY CONTEST

 

The Walt Whitman Birthplace Association maintains and operates the Walt Whitman Birthplace, home of America’s greatest poet.  All contestants and poetry lovers are encouraged to visit the Birthplace.  School groups may participate in a variety of unique educational programs.

GUIDELINES

THEME: Voice of the elements ELIGIBILITY:Students in grades 3-12

ENTRANCE CATEGORIES:

Category A – Individual poem, grades 3-4                                            Category G – Class anthology, grades 5-6

Category B – Individual poem, grades 5-6                                            Category H – Class anthology, grades 7-8

Category C – Individual poem, grades 7-8                                            Category   I – Class anthology, grades 9-10

Category D – Individual poem, grades 9-10                                          Category   J – Class anthology, grades 11-12

Category E – Individual poem, grades 11-12                                        Category  K – Multi-media

Category F – Class anthology, grades 3-4                                             Category  L – Individual anthology

 

FORMAT:

  1. Print or type a poem of up to 2 pages, double spaced.
  2. Individual poems MUST have the following information on EACH page or poems will be disqualified:
  • poem title and entrance category
  • entrant’s name, complete address, home phone number, age and grade level
  • school name, complete address, school phone number, and teacher’s name
  • for multiple entries by a teacher: poems must be noted by grade AND class period
  1. Class anthology MUST have the following information or anthologies will be disqualified:
  • anthology title
  • title sheet with the entrance category, teacher’s name, grade, school name, school phone number and complete address
  • the student’s name on each poem; student may enter a poem in an anthology and as an individual poem
  • all poems should be in binder or book form
  • for multiple entries by a teacher: anthologies must be noted by grade AND class period

 

DEADLINE:

Entries must be postmarked by MARCH 13, 2015   (not your deadline to turn into Mr. G!)

 

AWARDS:

  • Winners notified by mail in mid-May.
  • Awards ceremony: Sunday, May 31, 2015.
  • Awards distributed at the annual Walt Whitman Birthday Celebration held at the Walt Whitman Birthplace.  This is Walt’s 196TH birthday.
  • Grand Champion and multiple prize winners awarded in each category.
  • Grand Champion poems will be posted on the WWBA website and their names will be made available to the media.
  • Individual entries will NOT be returned.
  • To obtain a list of winners send self-addressed business envelope with two first class stamps.
  • Awards held for pickup at the Walt Whitman Birthplace until July 8, 2015.  They will not be mailed.
  • Winning and non-winning anthologies will be held for pickup until July 8, 2015.  They will not be mailed.

 

All submissions become the property of the Walt Whitman Birthplace and may be published online or in print.

The poems are judged by a panel of published poets selected by the Birthplace Trustees.

MAILING INSTRUCTIONS: POETRY CONTEST  -  Carolyn Diglio, Education Coordinator

Walt Whitman Birthplace Association

246 Old Walt Whitman Road

Huntington Station, NY  11746-4148

Information contact: Carolyn (631) 427-5240, ext. 113 or educator@waltwhitman.org This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

 




 

Friday

Feb 6

 

Begin QER for what is a Non-Violent Protest?

 

Back to Top

Quarter Three  Week Two

 

 
 

Monday

Feb 9

 

Explore Texts For QER using EBC for answers to supporting questions.
BOYCOTT (FILM), "Letter from Birmingham jail" Questions 1-8 on page 1146



Adjusted delayed opening schedule HERE
 

Tuesday

Feb 10

 

Explore Texts For QER using EBC for answers to supporting questions.

BOYCOTT (FILM), "Letter from Birmingham jail"
Martin Luther King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail"  (50 min)
Questions 1-8 on page 1146


Adjusted delayed opening schedule HERE
 

Wednesday

Feb 11

 

BOYCOTT (FILM), "Letter from Birmingham jail"


Dr. King: Nonviolence is the Most Powerful Weapon  (8 min)



Martin Luther King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail"  (50 min)
Questions 1-8 on page 1146



Half Day Parent Conference Day by Appointment
 

Thursday

Feb 12

 



BOYCOTT (FILM), "Letter from Birmingham jail"
Martin Luther King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail"
Questions 1-8 on page 1146
 

Friday

Feb 13

 

Mid Winter Recess Next Week- School Closed



Write a letter in response to Dr. King's letter from Birmingham jail.  Incorporate one quote from his letter in each of the three body paragraphs.


Use proper letter format for full credit.  For extra credit, write in cursive (script).

Due at the end of the period.





 

 

Back to Top

Quarter Three  Week Three

 

 
 

Monday

Feb 23

 

"Freedom Riders"
Excerpts for use with QER and Non Violent Training/Organization assignment.
 

Tuesday

Feb 24

 

Read

"Coming of Age in Mississippi" in the textbook. 

Respond as a journalist, in an article,  who witnesses the events at the  lunch counter...  keep in mind that you must remain "impartial" as a journalist.

Turn in handwritten draft and final copy.

Type your article for classroom display--  incorporate appropriate images as if your article were in the newspaper.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday

Feb 25

 

Wednesday, Feb 25, 2015

Periods 1,2,4,5,7 in room 1211

 

When you are done be sure to go to "Friday" and be prepared to complete the Third Quarter Project  DUE MARCH 6th.

NOW

 

Read "Coming of Age in Mississippi" in the textbook or here.

Respond as a journalist, in an article,  who witnesses the events at the  lunch counter...  keep in mind that you must remain "impartial" as a journalist.

Turn in handwritten draft and final copy.

Type your article for classroom display--  incorporate appropriate images as if your article were in the newspaper.

The following DIRECTIONS AND EXAMPLES are from  The Writing Lab & The OWL at Purdue and Purdue University and an excerpt below is for the contingency that internet service is interupted:

How to Write a Lead News Article:  DIRECTIONS AND EXAMPLES HERE

Tips for Writing a Lead

  1. The Five W’s and H: Before writing a lead, decide which aspect of the story – who, what, when, where, why, how – is most important. You should emphasize those aspects in your lead. Wait to explain less important aspects until the second or third sentence.
  2. Conflict: Good stories have conflict. So do many good leads.
  3. Specificity: Though you are essentially summarizing information in most leads, try to be specific as possible. If your lead is too broad, it won’t be informative or interesting.
  4. Brevity: Readers want to know why the story matters to them and they won’t wait long for the answer. Leads are often one sentence, sometimes two. Generally, they are 25 to 30 words and should rarely be more than 40. This is somewhat arbitrary, but it’s important – especially for young journalists – to learn how to deliver information concisely. See the OWL’s page on concise writing for specific tips. The Paramedic Method is also good for writing concisely.
  5. Active sentences: Strong verbs will make your lead lively and interesting. Passive constructions, on the other hand, can sound dull and leave out important information, such as the person or thing that caused the action. Incomplete reporting is often a source of passive leads.
  6. Audience and context: Take into account what your reader already knows. Remember that in today’s media culture, most readers become aware of breaking news as it happens. If you’re writing for a print publication the next day, your lead should do more than merely regurgitate yesterday’s news.
  7. Honesty: A lead is an implicit promise to your readers. You must be able to deliver what you promise in your lead.

What to Avoid

  1. Flowery language: Many beginning writers make the mistake of overusing adverbs and adjectives in their leads. Concentrate instead on using strong verbs and nouns.
  2. Unnecessary words or phrases: Watch out for unintentional redundancy. For example, 2 p.m. Wednesday afternoon, or very unique. You can’t afford to waste space in a news story, especially in the lead. Avoid clutter and cut right to the heart of the story.
  3. Formulaic leads: Because a lot of news writing is done on deadline, the temptation to write tired leads is strong. Resist it. Readers want information, but they also want to be entertained. Your lead must sound genuine, not merely mechanical.
  4. It: Most editors frown on leads that begin with the word it because it is not precise and disorients the reader.

 

 

 

 

Thursday

Feb 26

 

Thursday, Feb 26, 2015

period 1 in room 1102

periods 2,4,5,7 in room 1211

This is a test grade!

Prepare  guide/training manual for non-violent protest.  It should be able to be displayed in class.  Be sure to define/explain what a non-violent protest is!

Due today!

Tomorrow, turn in your completed QER--
QER
(Question Exploration Routine) on the essential question using class resources [your object as a 21st century learner is to try NOT to rely on Mr. G]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Friday

Feb 27

 

 Friday, Feb 27, 2015

period 1 in room 1102

periods 2,4,5,7 in room 1211

 

TYPE YOUR WALT WHITMAN POEM FOR YOUR QUARTER PROJECT

 

Third Quarter Project

Complete this and submit on March 6th at the start of class.


How do I enter and win the MOST RECENT Walt Whitman Birthplace Association Annual Poetry Contest   for my Third Quarter Project Grade? 
 

READ ALL OF THE INSTRUCTIONS --on all pages!



1 How many people may work together to complete the QER? students decide!


2 How many people to submit a completed QER for a grade?  Each and everyone!


3 Can we use the classroom Computer? Yes-- take turns and share what you are doing with the class!


4 Can we use the class textbook? Yes!


5 Are we using the computer lab?  YES!  ...  how can you find out without asking?


6 MOST IMPORTANTLY -- Are there special conditions for the project that are not part of the contest rules? Yes!    DETAILS   Click here
   



Complete this and submit on March 6th at the start of class.


FROM THE OFFICIAL CONTEST:

Walt Whitman Birthplace State Historic Site & Interpretive Center

 

246 Old Walt Whitman Road, Huntington Station, NY 11746

 

phone: 631-427-5240 || fax: 631-427-5247


 

TWENTY-NINTH ANNUAL POETRY CONTEST

Theme Announcement & Contest Guidelines


 

Theme:          voice of the elements

Contest: Become the poetic voice of Earth, Wind, Water or Fire

 

Walt Whitman often celebrated the elements of nature in their many shapes and forms.  In his poem, The Voice of the Rain, Whitman translates the words of the rain:

 

And who art thou?  said I to the soft-falling shower,

Which, strange to tell, gave me an answer, as here translated:

I am the Poem of Earth, said the voice of the rain,

Eternal I rise impalpable out of the land and the bottomless sea,

Upward to heaven, whence, vaguely form’d, altogether changed, and yet the same,

I descend to lave the drouths, atomies, dust-layers of the globe,

And all that in them without me were seeds only, latent, unborn;

And forever, by day and night, I give back life to my own origin, and make pure and beautify it;

(For song, issuing from its birth-place, after fulfilment, wandering,

Reck’d or unreck’d, duly with love returns.)

Walt Whitman                         (1885, 1888-89)

 

For this year’s contest, you should become the voice, or speak the words, of one of the four elements of nature: Earth, Wind, Water or Fire.  The elements take many forms.  For instance, the Wind may exist as a breeze, a waft, a gale, a tempest, an ill-wind, a tornado, etc.  The Earth could be a continent, an island, a mountain, an acre of arid soil, the bottom of the sea, etc.  Try to capture the spirit of one form and speak for it.  Become the element, and experience its personality, its wishes and desires.  What are its dreams, secrets, and/or fears?  What does it know and do best?  Why is it speaking?

In the poem above, Whitman follows the rain in its travels from the land and sea to heaven and back.  Read his poem aloud.  Talk about it in class.  What is the rain saying?  What is meant by the last two lines?  Why does Whitman use parentheses?  What is this poem about?  Notice Whitman’s vocabulary and unusual words.  Try and speak poetically in the tone of your element and use descriptive words to reflect its essence; rely on verbs and nouns, in addition to adjectives, to convey emotion and description.

Read other Whitman poems, such as: Earth, My Likeness; Proud Music of the Storm; and Roots and Leaves Themselves Alone.  Notice Whitman’s use of alliteration, assonance, simile and metaphor to enlarge the image and theme.  Find the rhythm in your element and reproduce it in your poem.  And now, let the elements speak!

Good luck!

 

In order to write this poem, you will need to think of the things of this world that make you joyful.  Look and listen to those around you. Like Whitman, consider the many people, places, activities, etc. in your everyday life.

Use Whitman’s technique of detailed descriptions and use of the senses to compose your poem.  Include some or all of your senses: see, smell, taste, touch, hear.  Remember to use images, similes and metaphors to show us your ideas.  Your poem should employ a longer line, like those of Whitman.  Search for unusual words and craft them into poetics of sounds, repeating letters for alliteration and vowels for assonance.  Try to avoid end rhymes, although slant or internal rhymes may be used.

With this swirl of involvement and observation, your writing will capture a world in itself.

 

Good luck! 

 

Individual poems, individual and class anthologies, multi-media

Contest rules mailed to you in early January 2015

Reservations & information:

Carolyn, Education Coordinator, 631-427-5240, ext. 113

educator@waltwhitman.org This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

THE WALT WHITMAN BIRTHPLACE ASSOCIATION IS PROUD TO PRESENT ITS TWENTY-NINTH ANNUAL POETRY CONTEST

 

The Walt Whitman Birthplace Association maintains and operates the Walt Whitman Birthplace, home of America’s greatest poet.  All contestants and poetry lovers are encouraged to visit the Birthplace.  School groups may participate in a variety of unique educational programs.

GUIDELINES

THEME: Voice of the elements ELIGIBILITY:Students in grades 3-12

ENTRANCE CATEGORIES:

Category A – Individual poem, grades 3-4                                            Category G – Class anthology, grades 5-6

Category B – Individual poem, grades 5-6                                            Category H – Class anthology, grades 7-8

Category C – Individual poem, grades 7-8                                            Category   I – Class anthology, grades 9-10

Category D – Individual poem, grades 9-10                                          Category   J – Class anthology, grades 11-12

Category E – Individual poem, grades 11-12                                        Category  K – Multi-media

Category F – Class anthology, grades 3-4                                             Category  L – Individual anthology

 

FORMAT:

  1. Print or type a poem of up to 2 pages, double spaced.
  2. Individual poems MUST have the following information on EACH page or poems will be disqualified:
  • poem title and entrance category
  • entrant’s name, complete address, home phone number, age and grade level
  • school name, complete address, school phone number, and teacher’s name
  • for multiple entries by a teacher: poems must be noted by grade AND class period
  1. Class anthology MUST have the following information or anthologies will be disqualified:
  • anthology title
  • title sheet with the entrance category, teacher’s name, grade, school name, school phone number and complete address
  • the student’s name on each poem; student may enter a poem in an anthology and as an individual poem
  • all poems should be in binder or book form
  • for multiple entries by a teacher: anthologies must be noted by grade AND class period

 

DEADLINE:

Entries must be postmarked by MARCH 13, 2015   (not your deadline to turn into Mr. G!)

 

AWARDS:

  • Winners notified by mail in mid-May.
  • Awards ceremony: Sunday, May 31, 2015.
  • Awards distributed at the annual Walt Whitman Birthday Celebration held at the Walt Whitman Birthplace.  This is Walt’s 196TH birthday.
  • Grand Champion and multiple prize winners awarded in each category.
  • Grand Champion poems will be posted on the WWBA website and their names will be made available to the media.
  • Individual entries will NOT be returned.
  • To obtain a list of winners send self-addressed business envelope with two first class stamps.
  • Awards held for pickup at the Walt Whitman Birthplace until July 8, 2015.  They will not be mailed.
  • Winning and non-winning anthologies will be held for pickup until July 8, 2015.  They will not be mailed.

 

All submissions become the property of the Walt Whitman Birthplace and may be published online or in print.

The poems are judged by a panel of published poets selected by the Birthplace Trustees.

MAILING INSTRUCTIONS: POETRY CONTEST  -  Carolyn Diglio, Education Coordinator

Walt Whitman Birthplace Association

246 Old Walt Whitman Road

Huntington Station, NY  11746-4148

Information contact: Carolyn (631) 427-5240, ext. 113 or educator@waltwhitman.org This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

 

 

 

 

 

Back to Top

Quarter Three  Week Four

 
  Third Quarter Project

Complete this and submit on March 6th at the start of class.


How do I enter and win the MOST RECENT Walt Whitman Birthplace Association Annual Poetry Contest   for my Third Quarter Project Grade? 
 

READ ALL OF THE INSTRUCTIONS --on all pages!



1 How many people may work together to complete the QER? students decide!


2 How many people to submit a completed QER for a grade?  Each and everyone!


3 Can we use the classroom Computer? Yes-- take turns and share what you are doing with the class!


4 Can we use the class textbook? Yes!


5 Are we using the computer lab?  YES!  ...  how can you find out without asking?


6 MOST IMPORTANTLY -- Are there special conditions for the project that are not part of the contest rules? Yes!    DETAILS   Click here
   



Complete this and submit March 6 th at the start of class.


FROM THE OFFICIAL CONTEST:

Walt Whitman Birthplace State Historic Site & Interpretive Center

 

246 Old Walt Whitman Road, Huntington Station, NY 11746

 

phone: 631-427-5240 || fax: 631-427-5247


 

TWENTY-NINTH ANNUAL POETRY CONTEST

Theme Announcement & Contest Guidelines


 

Theme:          voice of the elements

Contest: Become the poetic voice of Earth, Wind, Water or Fire

 

Walt Whitman often celebrated the elements of nature in their many shapes and forms.  In his poem, The Voice of the Rain, Whitman translates the words of the rain:

 

And who art thou?  said I to the soft-falling shower,

Which, strange to tell, gave me an answer, as here translated:

I am the Poem of Earth, said the voice of the rain,

Eternal I rise impalpable out of the land and the bottomless sea,

Upward to heaven, whence, vaguely form’d, altogether changed, and yet the same,

I descend to lave the drouths, atomies, dust-layers of the globe,

And all that in them without me were seeds only, latent, unborn;

And forever, by day and night, I give back life to my own origin, and make pure and beautify it;

(For song, issuing from its birth-place, after fulfilment, wandering,

Reck’d or unreck’d, duly with love returns.)

Walt Whitman                         (1885, 1888-89)

 

For this year’s contest, you should become the voice, or speak the words, of one of the four elements of nature: Earth, Wind, Water or Fire.  The elements take many forms.  For instance, the Wind may exist as a breeze, a waft, a gale, a tempest, an ill-wind, a tornado, etc.  The Earth could be a continent, an island, a mountain, an acre of arid soil, the bottom of the sea, etc.  Try to capture the spirit of one form and speak for it.  Become the element, and experience its personality, its wishes and desires.  What are its dreams, secrets, and/or fears?  What does it know and do best?  Why is it speaking?

In the poem above, Whitman follows the rain in its travels from the land and sea to heaven and back.  Read his poem aloud.  Talk about it in class.  What is the rain saying?  What is meant by the last two lines?  Why does Whitman use parentheses?  What is this poem about?  Notice Whitman’s vocabulary and unusual words.  Try and speak poetically in the tone of your element and use descriptive words to reflect its essence; rely on verbs and nouns, in addition to adjectives, to convey emotion and description.

Read other Whitman poems, such as: Earth, My Likeness; Proud Music of the Storm; and Roots and Leaves Themselves Alone.  Notice Whitman’s use of alliteration, assonance, simile and metaphor to enlarge the image and theme.  Find the rhythm in your element and reproduce it in your poem.  And now, let the elements speak!

Good luck!

 

In order to write this poem, you will need to think of the things of this world that make you joyful.  Look and listen to those around you. Like Whitman, consider the many people, places, activities, etc. in your everyday life.

Use Whitman’s technique of detailed descriptions and use of the senses to compose your poem.  Include some or all of your senses: see, smell, taste, touch, hear.  Remember to use images, similes and metaphors to show us your ideas.  Your poem should employ a longer line, like those of Whitman.  Search for unusual words and craft them into poetics of sounds, repeating letters for alliteration and vowels for assonance.  Try to avoid end rhymes, although slant or internal rhymes may be used.

With this swirl of involvement and observation, your writing will capture a world in itself.

 

Good luck! 

 

Individual poems, individual and class anthologies, multi-media

Contest rules mailed to you in early January 2015

Reservations & information:

Carolyn, Education Coordinator, 631-427-5240, ext. 113

educator@waltwhitman.org This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

THE WALT WHITMAN BIRTHPLACE ASSOCIATION IS PROUD TO PRESENT ITS TWENTY-NINTH ANNUAL POETRY CONTEST

 

The Walt Whitman Birthplace Association maintains and operates the Walt Whitman Birthplace, home of America’s greatest poet.  All contestants and poetry lovers are encouraged to visit the Birthplace.  School groups may participate in a variety of unique educational programs.

GUIDELINES

THEME: Voice of the elements ELIGIBILITY:Students in grades 3-12

ENTRANCE CATEGORIES:

Category A – Individual poem, grades 3-4                                            Category G – Class anthology, grades 5-6

Category B – Individual poem, grades 5-6                                            Category H – Class anthology, grades 7-8

Category C – Individual poem, grades 7-8                                            Category   I – Class anthology, grades 9-10

Category D – Individual poem, grades 9-10                                          Category   J – Class anthology, grades 11-12

Category E – Individual poem, grades 11-12                                        Category  K – Multi-media

Category F – Class anthology, grades 3-4                                             Category  L – Individual anthology

 

FORMAT:

  1. Print or type a poem of up to 2 pages, double spaced.
  2. Individual poems MUST have the following information on EACH page or poems will be disqualified:
  • poem title and entrance category
  • entrant’s name, complete address, home phone number, age and grade level
  • school name, complete address, school phone number, and teacher’s name
  • for multiple entries by a teacher: poems must be noted by grade AND class period
  1. Class anthology MUST have the following information or anthologies will be disqualified:
  • anthology title
  • title sheet with the entrance category, teacher’s name, grade, school name, school phone number and complete address
  • the student’s name on each poem; student may enter a poem in an anthology and as an individual poem
  • all poems should be in binder or book form
  • for multiple entries by a teacher: anthologies must be noted by grade AND class period

 

DEADLINE:

Entries must be postmarked by MARCH 13, 2015   (not your deadline to turn into Mr. G!)

 

AWARDS:

  • Winners notified by mail in mid-May.
  • Awards ceremony: Sunday, May 31, 2015.
  • Awards distributed at the annual Walt Whitman Birthday Celebration held at the Walt Whitman Birthplace.  This is Walt’s 196TH birthday.
  • Grand Champion and multiple prize winners awarded in each category.
  • Grand Champion poems will be posted on the WWBA website and their names will be made available to the media.
  • Individual entries will NOT be returned.
  • To obtain a list of winners send self-addressed business envelope with two first class stamps.
  • Awards held for pickup at the Walt Whitman Birthplace until July 8, 2015.  They will not be mailed.
  • Winning and non-winning anthologies will be held for pickup until July 8, 2015.  They will not be mailed.

 

All submissions become the property of the Walt Whitman Birthplace and may be published online or in print.

The poems are judged by a panel of published poets selected by the Birthplace Trustees.

MAILING INSTRUCTIONS: POETRY CONTEST  -  Carolyn Diglio, Education Coordinator

Walt Whitman Birthplace Association

246 Old Walt Whitman Road

Huntington Station, NY  11746-4148

Information contact: Carolyn (631) 427-5240, ext. 113 or educator@waltwhitman.org This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

 

 

 

 

Thursday

March 5

 

2nd Q PROJECT DUE FRIDAY
20% grade for quarter! DETAILS   Click here   




Work in Groups














 

Friday

March 6

 








Third Quarter Project 20% grade for quarter!
submit at the start of class.












Work in Groups














 

Back to Top

Quarter Three  Week Five

 

 
 

Monday

March 9

 

Monday March 9th   Scheduling Presentation   Mr. DelFranco 

http://www.longwood.k12.ny.us/lhs/hs_courseguide/

 

 

 

60

 

 

Third Quarter Project

Complete this and submit on March 6th at the start of class.


How do I enter and win the MOST RECENT Walt Whitman Birthplace Association Annual Poetry Contest   for my Third Quarter Project Grade? 
 

READ ALL OF THE INSTRUCTIONS --on all pages!



1 How many people may work together to complete the QER? students decide!


2 How many people to submit a completed QER for a grade?  Each and everyone!


3 Can we use the classroom Computer? Yes-- take turns and share what you are doing with the class!


4 Can we use the class textbook? Yes!


5 Are we using the computer lab?  YES!  ...  how can you find out without asking?


6 MOST IMPORTANTLY -- Are there special conditions for the project that are not part of the contest rules? Yes!    DETAILS   Click here
   



Complete this and submit on March 6th at the start of class.


FROM THE OFFICIAL CONTEST:

Walt Whitman Birthplace State Historic Site & Interpretive Center

 

246 Old Walt Whitman Road, Huntington Station, NY 11746

 

phone: 631-427-5240 || fax: 631-427-5247


 

TWENTY-NINTH ANNUAL POETRY CONTEST

Theme Announcement & Contest Guidelines


 

Theme:          voice of the elements

Contest: Become the poetic voice of Earth, Wind, Water or Fire

 

Walt Whitman often celebrated the elements of nature in their many shapes and forms.  In his poem, The Voice of the Rain, Whitman translates the words of the rain:

 

And who art thou?  said I to the soft-falling shower,

Which, strange to tell, gave me an answer, as here translated:

I am the Poem of Earth, said the voice of the rain,

Eternal I rise impalpable out of the land and the bottomless sea,

Upward to heaven, whence, vaguely form’d, altogether changed, and yet the same,

I descend to lave the drouths, atomies, dust-layers of the globe,

And all that in them without me were seeds only, latent, unborn;

And forever, by day and night, I give back life to my own origin, and make pure and beautify it;

(For song, issuing from its birth-place, after fulfilment, wandering,

Reck’d or unreck’d, duly with love returns.)

Walt Whitman                         (1885, 1888-89)

 

For this year’s contest, you should become the voice, or speak the words, of one of the four elements of nature: Earth, Wind, Water or Fire.  The elements take many forms.  For instance, the Wind may exist as a breeze, a waft, a gale, a tempest, an ill-wind, a tornado, etc.  The Earth could be a continent, an island, a mountain, an acre of arid soil, the bottom of the sea, etc.  Try to capture the spirit of one form and speak for it.  Become the element, and experience its personality, its wishes and desires.  What are its dreams, secrets, and/or fears?  What does it know and do best?  Why is it speaking?

In the poem above, Whitman follows the rain in its travels from the land and sea to heaven and back.  Read his poem aloud.  Talk about it in class.  What is the rain saying?  What is meant by the last two lines?  Why does Whitman use parentheses?  What is this poem about?  Notice Whitman’s vocabulary and unusual words.  Try and speak poetically in the tone of your element and use descriptive words to reflect its essence; rely on verbs and nouns, in addition to adjectives, to convey emotion and description.

Read other Whitman poems, such as: Earth, My Likeness; Proud Music of the Storm; and Roots and Leaves Themselves Alone.  Notice Whitman’s use of alliteration, assonance, simile and metaphor to enlarge the image and theme.  Find the rhythm in your element and reproduce it in your poem.  And now, let the elements speak!

Good luck!

 

In order to write this poem, you will need to think of the things of this world that make you joyful.  Look and listen to those around you. Like Whitman, consider the many people, places, activities, etc. in your everyday life.

Use Whitman’s technique of detailed descriptions and use of the senses to compose your poem.  Include some or all of your senses: see, smell, taste, touch, hear.  Remember to use images, similes and metaphors to show us your ideas.  Your poem should employ a longer line, like those of Whitman.  Search for unusual words and craft them into poetics of sounds, repeating letters for alliteration and vowels for assonance.  Try to avoid end rhymes, although slant or internal rhymes may be used.

With this swirl of involvement and observation, your writing will capture a world in itself.

 

Good luck! 

 

Individual poems, individual and class anthologies, multi-media

Contest rules mailed to you in early January 2015

Reservations & information:

Carolyn, Education Coordinator, 631-427-5240, ext. 113

educator@waltwhitman.org This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

THE WALT WHITMAN BIRTHPLACE ASSOCIATION IS PROUD TO PRESENT ITS TWENTY-NINTH ANNUAL POETRY CONTEST

 

The Walt Whitman Birthplace Association maintains and operates the Walt Whitman Birthplace, home of America’s greatest poet.  All contestants and poetry lovers are encouraged to visit the Birthplace.  School groups may participate in a variety of unique educational programs.

GUIDELINES

THEME: Voice of the elements ELIGIBILITY:Students in grades 3-12

ENTRANCE CATEGORIES:

Category A – Individual poem, grades 3-4                                            Category G – Class anthology, grades 5-6

Category B – Individual poem, grades 5-6                                            Category H – Class anthology, grades 7-8

Category C – Individual poem, grades 7-8                                            Category   I – Class anthology, grades 9-10

Category D – Individual poem, grades 9-10                                          Category   J – Class anthology, grades 11-12

Category E – Individual poem, grades 11-12                                        Category  K – Multi-media

Category F – Class anthology, grades 3-4                                             Category  L – Individual anthology

 

FORMAT:

  1. Print or type a poem of up to 2 pages, double spaced.
  2. Individual poems MUST have the following information on EACH page or poems will be disqualified:
  • poem title and entrance category
  • entrant’s name, complete address, home phone number, age and grade level
  • school name, complete address, school phone number, and teacher’s name
  • for multiple entries by a teacher: poems must be noted by grade AND class period
  1. Class anthology MUST have the following information or anthologies will be disqualified:
  • anthology title
  • title sheet with the entrance category, teacher’s name, grade, school name, school phone number and complete address
  • the student’s name on each poem; student may enter a poem in an anthology and as an individual poem
  • all poems should be in binder or book form
  • for multiple entries by a teacher: anthologies must be noted by grade AND class period

 

DEADLINE:

Entries must be postmarked by MARCH 13, 2015   (not your deadline to turn into Mr. G!)

 

AWARDS:

  • Winners notified by mail in mid-May.
  • Awards ceremony: Sunday, May 31, 2015.
  • Awards distributed at the annual Walt Whitman Birthday Celebration held at the Walt Whitman Birthplace.  This is Walt’s 196TH birthday.
  • Grand Champion and multiple prize winners awarded in each category.
  • Grand Champion poems will be posted on the WWBA website and their names will be made available to the media.
  • Individual entries will NOT be returned.
  • To obtain a list of winners send self-addressed business envelope with two first class stamps.
  • Awards held for pickup at the Walt Whitman Birthplace until July 8, 2015.  They will not be mailed.
  • Winning and non-winning anthologies will be held for pickup until July 8, 2015.  They will not be mailed.

 

All submissions become the property of the Walt Whitman Birthplace and may be published online or in print.

The poems are judged by a panel of published poets selected by the Birthplace Trustees.

MAILING INSTRUCTIONS: POETRY CONTEST  -  Carolyn Diglio, Education Coordinator

Walt Whitman Birthplace Association

246 Old Walt Whitman Road

Huntington Station, NY  11746-4148

Information contact: Carolyn (631) 427-5240, ext. 113 or educator@waltwhitman.org This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday

March 10

 

59

Class reading ASSIGNMENT
 

Wednesday

March 11

 

58

GROUP RESEARCH FOR PRESENTATIONS MONDAY
 

Thursday

March 12

 

57


GROUP RESEARCH FOR PRESENTATIONS MONDAY
 

Friday

March 13

 

56


GROUP RESEARCH FOR PRESENTATIONS MONDAY

 

Back to Top

 

Quarter Three  Week Six

 

 
 

Monday

March 16

 

56
Catcher in the Rye Presentations
 

Tuesday

March 17

 

55
Catcher in the Rye Presentations

About JD Salinger  HERE 

-- archived copy   here.

 

Wednesday

March 18

 

54
Assessment
Meet in 1102 

About JD Salinger  HERE 

-- archived copy   here.

Google

 

Thursday

March 19

 

53

Benchmark
Meet in 1102 

Assessment
Meet in 1102 

About JD Salinger  HERE 

-- archived copy   here.

Google

 

Friday

March 20

 

52

Assessment
Meet in 1102 

About JD Salinger  HERE 

-- archived copy   here.

Google

 

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Quarter Three  Week Seven

 
 

Monday

March 23

 

51
Finding Forrester assignment.
 

Tuesday

March 24

 

50
Finding Forrester assignment.
 

Wednesday

March 25

 

49
Finding Forrester assignment.
 

Thursday

March 26

 

48
Finding Forrester assignment.
 

Friday

March 27

 

47


AIR Accountable Independent Reading Project for the 4th quarter.

After identifying the ten 21st Century Skills you would like to work on, rank them in order and consider what possible project you could do to sharpen your skills as part of your AIR Accountable Independent Reading  Project.


Create a PROJECT PROPOSAL  Here

Develop a RUBRIC

 

Back to Top

 

 

Quarter Three  Week Eight

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quarter Four  Week One

 
 

Monday

March 30

 

46

Finding Forrester assignment.
 

Tuesday

March 31

 

45


1)  Create your project proposal with a rubric Due Monday April 13th
2) Have book approved and with you by Monday April 13th







AIR Accountable Independent Reading Project for the 4th quarter.

After identifying the ten 21st Century Skills you would like to work on, rank them in order and consider what possible project you could do to sharpen your skills as part of your AIR Accountable Independent Reading  Project.


Create a PROJECT PROPOSAL  Here

Develop a RUBRIC
 

Wednesday

April 1

 

44













AIR Accountable Independent Reading Project for the 4th quarter.

After identifying the ten 21st Century Skills you would like to work on, rank them in order and consider what possible project you could do to sharpen your skills as part of your AIR Accountable Independent Reading  Project.


Create a PROJECT PROPOSAL  Here

Develop a RUBRIC
 

Thursday

April 2

 

Spring Recess School Closed
 

Friday

April 3

 

Spring Recess School Closed & Next Week (APRIL 10 is Emergency Day if 3 emergency days are used)
 
Friday 10 th   Meet in computer lab. 


1)  Create your project proposal with a rubric Due Monday April 13th
2)  Have book approved and with you by Monday April 13th







AIR Accountable Independent Reading Project for the 4th quarter.

After identifying the ten 21st Century Skills you would like to work on, rank them in order and consider what possible project you could do to sharpen your skills as part of your AIR Accountable Independent Reading  Project.


Create a PROJECT PROPOSAL  Here

Develop a RUBRIC

 

Back to Top

 

Quarter Four  Week Two

 
 

Monday

April 13

 

43
DUE TODAY:

1)  Create your project proposal with a rubric Due Monday April 13th
2)  Have book approved and with you by Monday April 13th

AIR Accountable Independent Reading Project for the 4th quarter.

After identifying the ten 21st Century Skills you would like to work on, rank them in order and consider what possible project you could do to sharpen your skills as part of your AIR Accountable Independent Reading  Project.

Create a PROJECT PROPOSAL
  Here

Develop a
RUBRIC

Today we will begin to study the connections between civil rights and women's rights in America.

 

So just for a minute, think about a decision your mom made while you were growing up. Thought of something? OK, now try answering these questions:

  1. What was the decision? How did your mom's decision impact you?
  2. Do you think it was a good decision? Did she have any other options?
  3. How does she feel about her decision?
  4.  Do you know? Does she drop any hints?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Essential Question: 

How do oppression and social limitations affect people's attainment of the American dream?

Group presentations THURSDAY.

 

PART 1) Toward the essential question--  the group decides out loud or quiet reading being on task is this week's participation grade!

 

"The Yellow Wallpaper"  p763          GROUP 1

"Seventeen Syllables"  p788             GROUP 2

"I Stand Here Ironing"   p806           GROUP 3

"In the American Society"  p877      GROUP 4

"Winter Dreams"    p840                   GROUP 5

 

 

PART 2) Complete a worksheet, or your own chart, based on the following:

          

Female dreams and reality (Obstacles &  Society’s View)    Male dreams and reality (Obstacles &  Society’s View)  

EBC--  Select five quotations for both female and male where you identify their Dream or the Reality they must face and how the society they live in would view the character’s action / choice/ belief (the ABC's) in the face of any obstacles. 

 

PART  3)

Work together to create a found poem using phrases or sentences found in the text where each person in the group contributes three lines and reads their part to the class.

or

You group presents to the class the way your research and text relate to the essential question.

How do oppression and social limitations affect people's attainment of the American dream?






 

Tuesday

April 14

 

42


 

Essential Question: 

How do oppression and social limitations affect people's attainment of the American dream?

 

PART 1) Toward the essential question--  the group decides out loud or quiet reading being on task is this week's participation grade!

 

"The Yellow Wallpaper"  p763          GROUP 1

"Seventeen Syllables"  p788             GROUP 2

"I Stand Here Ironing"   p806           GROUP 3

"In the American Society"  p877      GROUP 4

"Winter Dreams"    p840                   GROUP 5

 

 

PART 2) Complete a worksheet, or your own chart, based on the following:

          

Female dreams and reality (Obstacles &  Society’s View)    Male dreams and reality (Obstacles &  Society’s View)  

EBC--  Select five quotations for both female and male where you identify their Dream or the Reality they must face and how the society they live in would view the character’s action / choice/ belief (the ABC's) in the face of any obstacles. 

 

PART  3)

Work together to create a found poem using phrases or sentences found in the text where each person in the group contributes three lines and reads their part to the class.

or

You group presents to the class the way your research and text relate to the essential question.

How do oppression and social limitations affect people's attainment of the American dream?










 

Wednesday

April 15

 

41

Essential Question: 

How do oppression and social limitations affect people's attainment of the American dream?

 

PART 1) Toward the essential question--  the group decides out loud or quiet reading being on task is this week's participation grade!

 

"The Yellow Wallpaper"  p763          GROUP 1

"Seventeen Syllables"  p788             GROUP 2

"I Stand Here Ironing"   p806           GROUP 3

"In the American Society"  p877      GROUP 4

"Winter Dreams"    p840                   GROUP 5

 

 

PART 2) Complete a worksheet, or your own chart, based on the following:

          

Female dreams and reality (Obstacles &  Society’s View)    Male dreams and reality (Obstacles &  Society’s View)  

EBC--  Select five quotations for both female and male where you identify their Dream or the Reality they must face and how the society they live in would view the character’s action / choice/ belief (the ABC's) in the face of any obstacles. 

 

PART  3)

Work together to create a found poem using phrases or sentences found in the text where each person in the group contributes three lines and reads their part to the class.

or

You group presents to the class the way your research and text relate to the essential question.

How do oppression and social limitations affect people's attainment of the American dream?

 

Thursday

April 16

 

40

Cinderella, Rapunzel, Little Red, Sleeping Beauty... What can they tell us about the the origins or perpetuation of stereotypes?

In your group, rewrite one of these stories and change all of the genders for reading in class next week. 

Identify any stereotypes you find as part of your presentation and what is unusual about the roles of females as portrayed in the text.

What is the author's purpose ("lesson to be learned") or bias revealed in the text?



Rewrite assigned Grimm's Fairy Tale for presentation next Wednesday.



 

Friday

April 17

 

39
How do oppression and social limitations affect people's attainment of the American dream?



How does employing our knowledge of female stereotypes help us see author's purpose or bias?


Why Education?
Marriage Preparation: 1950's Style

Course selection??? 1950?
Why Study Home Economics? (1955)


Careers?
1950s Education On "Women"

Discuss-
What stereotypes are revealed in the films?
Should a woman take the name of her husband when they are married?    WHY? 
 



Enrichment as related to class questions and discussion:

Petition to End Women's Suffrage   (it's nice with definition to start and disclaimer at end-- HS project) 

The Trouble With Women

Barbie in a "Swimsuit Issue" what might this say about stereotype and  sexism?

Today (4/ 14/ 2015) marks “Equal Pay Day,” the date that symbolizes how far into the new year the average American woman would have to work to earn what the average American man did in the previous year.

Gender Roles-Interviews with Kids

Girl's rant targets gender roles, toys  

'You Can't Be a Princess': WWYD?

Disney Movies and their Effect on Gender Roles in Society

 



 

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Quarter Four  Week Three

 
 

Monday

April 20

 

38

Project Rubric Due for approval.

Complete story assignment and prepare to read Fairy Tale Wed.

 

Tuesday

April 21

 

37

"The Story of an Hour"

P 783  Read Building Background.

Complete questions 1 3 4 5 7 and 9 in complete sentences.

Notes and analysis for Regents Review.

Notes and analysis for Regents Review.

"The Story of an Hour"  TEXT

(student project)  9min

Lecture/Notes on Kate Chopin's "The Story of an Hour"   14min

 

 

 

 

Wednesday

April 22

 

36

Reading Fairy Tale adaptations... complete "Disney Princess Worksheet."  Work Due.




 

Thursday

April 23

 

35







IF NOT DONE COMPLETE

 

Notes and analysis for Regents Review.

Notes and analysis for Regents Review.

"The Story of an Hour"  TEXT

(student project)  9min

Lecture/Notes on Kate Chopin's "The Story of an Hour"   14min

Today, complete a found poem (twenty lines minimum) according to directions using any of the materials from page 783 through and including the description of the author of "The Story of an Hour."

 

 

 

 

 

Friday

April 24

 

34
We will use the following days to complete "The Rest Cure" assignment. 

Friday, Apr 24, 2015

Period 1 & 7 in room 2120

periods 2,4,5 in room 1102

Tuesday, Apr 28, 2015

Periods 1,2,7 in room 2120

Period 4 in room 2118

period 5 in room 1211

 

 

The following is due NEXT Friday for display and counts as four HW assignments!

 

Create and complete an advertisement for "The Rest Cure" as described in "The Yellow Wallpaper" found in the textbook (along with supplementary materials). 

 

Research (you may use the textbook or other sources) and create a full page 8*11 or larger "Advertising Page / Poster" for a "rest cure" (or elixir / snake oil to help in giving the cure) for a 19th century woman.

What should it include?

1. Symptoms of female "hysteria" that would lead to the rest cure being prescribed (19th century) 25%  Search "The Hysterical Female" &  Google  and here.

2. Treatments for "hysteria" and those other symptoms 25%

3. Positive outcomes of treatment 25%

4. Be ready for publication and on time using proper English and appropriate for class display 25%  (recall our focus is on suffrage).

 

Do this in the format of an ad you might see in the news or a magazine of the time (19th century). It might be selling the benefits of the rest cure for a modern woman of the 1800's- what would this perfect woman value? Is it her husband that is buying the cure?

Image search for "rest cure" here   for elixir here and snake oil here -- Old News here  ---try looking for images here

 

 

Check out the following---

Silas Weir Mitchell and the rest cure--

Weir Mitchell (1829–1914), the American neurologist, renowned for his work on causalgia, was also interested in hysteria. He first encountered it in soldiers during the civil war.

In civilian practice when faced with patients with neurosis and hysteria he developed his “rest cure”. It was based, he said, on moral and physical components described in his book Fat and blood; the title reflected his experience that women with hysteria were often thin and anaemic. In addition to rest he insisted on removing the patient from their environment, asking them to write their life history, and using exercise, electrical stimulation, and a nutritious diet. In his hands, a rest cure was a success, perhaps owing to his patients’ immense respect and faith in him. But Weir Mitchell was wise enough to anticipate and thereby prevent what we now label illness behaviour:

“...to lie abed half the day and sew a little, and read a little, and be interesting and excite sympathy, is all very well, but when they are bidden to stay in bed a month, and neither to read, write nor sew, and to have one nurse—who is not a relative—then rest becomes for some women a rather bitter medicine and they are glad enough to accept the order to rise and go about when the doctor issues a mandate which has become pleasantly welcome and eagerly looked for.”

Attending a lady, sick unto death, he dismissed his assistants from the room then soon left himself. Asked of her chances of survival he remarked:

“Yes she will run out of the door in two minutes; I set her sheets on fire. A case of hysteria.”

His prediction thankfully proved correct.

“I urged, scolded and teased and bribed and decoyed along the road to health; but this is what it means to treat hysteria.”

---Historical note  from the JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association):

 

This excerpt is from the book Complaints and Disorders  pages 32-40 and describes treatment.

Sample ad:

 

Image search for "rest cure" here   for elixir here and snake oil here

Old News here  ---try looking for images here

 

 

 



 

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Quarter Four  Week Four

 
 

Monday

April 27

 

33



AIR Accountable Independent Reading project for the 4th quarter is due in 22 class days  You have had 3 weeks to work on it.




Notes and analysis for Regents Review.

"The Story of an Hour"  TEXT

(student project)  9min

Lecture/Notes on Kate Chopin's "The Story of an Hour"   14min

 

 

 

Tuesday

April 28

 

32


AIR Accountable Independent Reading project for the 4th quarter is due in 3 weeks  At this point you have reached the 1/2 way mark. You have had 3 weeks to work on it.

Tuesday, Apr 28, 2015

Periods 1,2,7 in room 2120

Period 4 in room 2118

period 5 in room 1211

 

Create and complete an advertisement for "The Rest Cure" as described in "The Yellow Wallpaper" and supplementary materials found in the textbook. 

See details from Friday the 24th.

 

DIRECTIONS: 

Research (you may use the textbook or other sources) and create a full page 8*11 or larger "Advertising Page / Poster" for a "rest cure" (or elixir / snake oil to help in giving the cure) for a 19th century woman.

What should it include?

1. Symptoms of female "hysteria" that would lead to the rest cure being prescribed (19th century) 25%  Search "The Hysterical Female" &  Google  and here

2. Treatments for "hysteria" and those other symptoms 25%

3. Positive outcomes of treatment 25%

4. Be ready for publication and on time using proper English and appropriate for class display 25%  (recall our focus is on suffrage)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday

April 29

 

31


AIR Accountable Independent Reading project for the 4th quarter is due in 3 weeks  At this point you have reached the 1/2 way mark. You have had 3 weeks to work on it.

Essential Question: 

How do oppression and social limitations affect people's attainment of the American dream?

FILM STUDY  (SEE ME FOR EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITIES WITH THIS ASSIGNMENT)

Mona Lisa Smile

On a separate sheet of paper complete 3 of any of the 14 tasks for the film study Mona Lisa Smile – Film Study Options adapted using the study guide are Here (adapted from the the study guide ).

 Where not specified, respond in paragraph format
AND  any  one  of  the  Focus / Enrichment Questions located below:

Focus / Enrichment Questions

1.    What has changed the way we perceive gender roles? What has not changed?

2.    How has our society’s power structure affected gender relations?

3.    What role do the media play in perpetuating gender stereotypes?

4.    How has women’s inequality been established/enforced throughout American history?

5.    How has the media’s perception of body image affected women’s body image?

6.    How has women’s body image been molded by the media over time?

7.    In what ways have women’s rights evolved over time?

8.    In what ways have gender roles evolved over time and how do they impact daily lives?

9.    Why have women been historically excluded from political thinking and roles?

10.  How is women’s involvement in politics limited by gender/societal expectations?

11.  What’s the connection between expected societal roles for women and the level of respect/power they’re issued?

12.  How have American women impacted social and political issues globally?

13.  How has clothing and appearance of women changed over time? Is there a relationship between the change and their political roles?

14.  How have women’s professional roles developed over time?

15.  What role has marriage played in the lives of women over time?

16.  How has women’s role in politics changed throughout history? How has politics changed due to women?

17.  What is the connection between women meeting appearance ideals/expectations and their success/power in society?





 

Thursday

April

 

30


Essential Question: 

How do oppression and social limitations affect people's attainment of the American dream?

FILM STUDY

 

 

Friday

May 1

 

29



Essential Question: 

How do oppression and social limitations affect people's attainment of the American dream?

FILM STUDY

 

 

Back to Top

 

Quarter Four  Week Five

 
 

Monday

May 4

 

28 AIR day
Work on essay or other task related to your project for this quarter.

AIR Accountable Independent Reading project for the 4th quarter is due in 3 weeks  At this point you have reached the 1/2 way mark. You have had 3 weeks to work on it.
 

Tuesday

May 5

 

27


Complete Mona Lisa Smile activity and turn in.  Interim Reports are due Friday.

Pick up "Death of a Salesman" (DOAS) from the library.  

Begin Reading and Introduction to DOAS.


Is the American Dream an illusion?

As part of answering this question we to read Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller.
Begin a QER on a separate sheet of paper for this unit:


Step 1 -- What is the Essential or Critical Question?  

Step 2 -- What are the Key Terms and explanations?

Step 3 -- What are the Supporting Questions and answers?    

Step 4 -- What is the Main Idea answer for the Essential or Critical Question?    

Step 5 -- How can we use the Essential or Critical Question answer?     

Step 6 -- Is there an Overall  Idea for the Essential or Critical Question and answer? Is there a real-world use? In what ways might we use this new knowledge based on our evidence and reflection?




For enrichment:  What questions or areas of research does the answer to this question lead you to and why?  How would you propose to answer the question you propose???



 

Wednesday

May 6

 

26
Begin Reading and Introduction to DOAS.
 

Thursday

May 7

 

25



Thursday, May 7, 2015

Perods 1,2,7 in room 2120

periods 4 & 5 in room 2118

 

AIR day
Work on essay or other task related to your project for this quarter.

 

 

Friday

May 8

 

24



Friday, May 8, 2015

Periods 1,2,7 in room 2120

periods 4 & 5 in room 2118

AIR day
Work on essay or other task related to your project for this quarter. AIR Accountable Independent Reading project for the 4th quarter is due in 3 weeks  At this point you have reached the 1/2 way mark. You have had 3 weeks to work on it.

 

 

 

Back to Top

 

Quarter Four  Week Six

 
 

Monday

May 11

 

 

23
AIR Accountable Independent Reading project for the 4th quarter is due in 2 weeks  At this point you should have completed your reading. You have had 4 weeks to work on it.







Is the American Dream an illusion?

As part of answering this question we to read Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller.
Begin a QER on a separate sheet of paper for this unit:


Step 1 -- What is the Essential or Critical Question?  

Step 2 -- What are the Key Terms and explanations?

Step 3 -- What are the Supporting Questions and answers?    

Step 4 -- What is the Main Idea answer for the Essential or Critical Question?    

Step 5 -- How can we use the Essential or Critical Question answer?     

Step 6 -- Is there an Overall  Idea for the Essential or Critical Question and answer? Is there a real-world use? In what ways might we use this new knowledge based on our evidence and reflection?


For enrichment:  What questions or areas of research does the answer to this question lead you to and why?  How would you propose to answer the question you propose???


 

Tuesday

May 12

 

22


Continue Reading








 

 

 

 

Wednesday

May 13

 

21

Is the American Dream an illusion?

As part of answering this question we to read Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller.
Begin a QER on a separate sheet of paper for this unit:


Step 1 -- What is the Essential or Critical Question?  

Step 2 -- What are the Key Terms and explanations?

Step 3 -- What are the Supporting Questions and answers?    

Step 4 -- What is the Main Idea answer for the Essential or Critical Question?    

Step 5 -- How can we use the Essential or Critical Question answer?     

Step 6 -- Is there an Overall  Idea for the Essential or Critical Question and answer? Is there a real-world use? In what ways might we use this new knowledge based on our evidence and reflection?


For enrichment:  What questions or areas of research does the answer to this question lead you to and why?  How would you propose to answer the question you propose???








 

Thursday

May 14

 

20


Continue Reading




 

Friday

May 15

 

19

Continue Reading



AIR Accountable Independent Reading project for the 4th quarter is due in 2 weeks  At this point you should have completed your reading. You have had 4 weeks to work on it.

 

Back to Top

 

Quarter Four  Week Seven

 
 

Monday

May 18

 

18
AIR Accountable Independent Reading project for the 4th quarter is due in 1 week  At this point you should have completed the first draft of any project you have proposed. You have had 5 weeks to work on it.



 

Tuesday

May 19

 

17



 

Wednesday

May 20

 

16


 

Thursday

May 21

 

15
AIR Accountable Independent Reading project for the 4th quarter is due in 1 week  At this point you should have completed the first draft of any project you have proposed. You have had 5 weeks to work on it.



For those of you doing presentations or public speaking you must be prepared to present every day beginning Monday June 1st



COMP LAB
 

Friday

May 22

 

14


AIR Accountable Independent Reading
For those of you doing presentations or public speaking you must be prepared to present every day beginning Monday June 1st

COMP LAB


 

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Quarter Four  Week Eight

 
 

Monday

 

Memorial Day
 

Tuesday

May 26

 

13 AIR Accountable Independent Reading project for the 4th quarter is due in next Monday at the start of class.  At this point you should be revising the final draft of any project you have proposed. You have had 6 weeks to work on it.


For those of you doing presentations or public speaking you must be prepared to present every day beginning Monday June 1st
 

Wednesday

May 27

 

12

Regents Review Activities as assigned (or other work if you have passed the ELA exam).
 

Thursday

May 28

 

11

Regents Review Activities as assigned (or other work if you have passed the ELA exam).
 

Friday

May 29

 

10
AIR Accountable Independent Reading project for the 4th quarter is due in next Monday at the start of class.  At this point you should be revising the final draft of any project you have proposed. You have had 6 weeks to work on it.

 

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Quarter Four  Week Nine

 
 

Monday

June 1

 

9
The last day of classes will be Friday, June 12th. This is a link to the Exam Schedule.  

Tuesday, June 2 Longwood will be hosting the Common Core Geometry Exam. We will have a normal school day period 1-4. At the end of period 4 students will be dismissed to their buses. All students taking the Common Core Exam will go to assigned Cafe's. At 10:47 they will go to their assigned testing rooms. BOCES students will go to the LGI and then to the Cafe after 10:47. 

Here is a link that has the testing room and proctoring assignments for that day. Unlike Regents week proctoring the assignments are done in 40-50 minute blocks.



WRITING THE GROUP ESSAY




 

Tuesday

June 2

 

8

Regents Review Activities as assigned (or other work if you have passed the ELA exam).
 

Wednesday

June 3

 

7

Regents Review Activities as assigned (or other work if you have passed the ELA exam).
 

Thursday

June 4

 

6

Regents Review Activities as assigned (or other work if you have passed the ELA exam).
 

Friday

June 5

 

5

Regents Review Activities as assigned (or other work if you have passed the ELA exam).

 

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Quarter Four  Week Ten

 
 

Monday

June 8

 

4

60 second recap  HERE

SHMOOP  HERE


Regents Review Activities as assigned (or other work if you have passed the ELA exam).
 

Tuesday

June 9

 

3

Regents Review Activities as assigned (or other work if you have passed the ELA exam).

60 second recap  HERE

SHMOOP  HERE
 

Wednesday

June 10

 

2

Regents Review Activities as assigned (or other work if you have passed the ELA exam).

Multiple choice strategies

Answering Multiple Choice Questions

How to Guess on a Test -- Intelligent Guessing Strategies


Reading  / Youtube

What is it?

Outline 6min

 Question 28(5 min)

 
 

Thursday

June 11

 

1

Regents Review Activities as assigned (or other work if you have passed the ELA exam).

Multiple choice strategies

Answering Multiple Choice Questions

How to Guess on a Test -- Intelligent Guessing Strategies


Reading  / Youtube

What is it?

Outline 6min

 Question 28(5 min)

 
 

Friday

June 12

 

0
Regents Review Activities as assigned (or other work if you have passed the ELA exam).

The last day of classes is Friday, June 12th. This is a link to the Exam Schedule.  




Multiple choice strategies

Answering Multiple Choice Questions

How to Guess on a Test -- Intelligent Guessing Strategies


Reading  / Youtube

What is it?

Outline 6min

 Question 28(5 min)

 
 

 

 

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Quarter Four  Week Eleven

 
 

Monday

June 15

 

 
 

Tuesday

June 16

 

 
 

Wednesday

June 17

 

 
 

Thursday

June 18

 

 
 

Friday

June 19

 

 

 

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Quarter Four  Week 12

 
 

Monday

June 22

 

 
 

Tuesday

June 23

 

 
 

Wednesday

June 24

 

 
 

Thursday

June 25

 

Marking Period Ends
 

Friday

June 26

 

Conference Day
 

 

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