English 11R American Literature 2013-2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Use Link to right:  Fourth Quarter WORK    WEEK ONE, TWO, THREE, FOUR, FIVE, SIX, SEVEN, EIGHT,  NINE  Make-up / Finals/ Regents

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FIRST QUARTER:

11

WEEK ONE

 

Work for the Week

September  9

Monday

 

Administrative "Stuff" and Introductions:

Compare rosters and schedules.  Some room changes were made after the walk through and others based on building/district needs. 

If students do not have schedules, write the students’ names on a piece of paper and send ONE student to Counseling Center to get a copy of the schedules. 

During period one, check to see that you have all of your core courses on your schedule: English, Social Studies, Math, Science, PE and LOTE.  (Students missing core classes should be directed to complete a Counseling Center appointment form during lunch period.)    I may not allow students who are not on my roster to remain in the classroom.  You will be sent to the Counseling Center to have your schedule verified. 

If a child appears on your roster, but no longer wishes to take the class based on personal preference, he should be directed to complete a Counseling Center appointment form during his lunch period.  Ms. Paolini will place the appointment cards in all lunch periods by a Staff Assistant post.  Students will be seen by grade level starting with the Seniors , then Juniors, Sophomores and Freshmen.  This process may take a few days, but it is the most efficient way to ensure that graduating Seniors get the classes they need to fulfill graduation requirements.  All underclassmen appointments will be set based on priority.  Counselors will make every effort to meet with students during their lunch period.

An introduction to my website dropthemouse.com

DISCUSSION ABOUT THE PARENT PORTAL AND MISSING ASSIGNMENTS  approximately 10 days from date turned in-- not from the due date. They can see attendance and a running grade book! Did you do your HW?  How did you do on that quiz?  What is up with the participation?

Meet, Complete, Record on Sheet   

Do you get it?  or    let me see!    1 2 3  or 4.

1 = what are you talking about.

2= I'm confused.

3= I get most of it.

4= let's move on I got this!

AN INTRODUCTION AMERICAN LITERATURE AND TO THE REGENTS EXAM    

OTHERS

PORTFOLIOS -- a record of our improvement in writing and skills.

DAILY JOURNALS -- these are ideas we consider to help us focus on the lesson we are working on that day.

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS --these are questions we try to answer that form the center of a unit we study so that by the end of the unit we can respond thoughtfully and in a reasoned manner.

PASSING RECORD (Formerly the "late book")

10

Tuesday

Today you will identify and set personal goals and steps they you need to reach them.

Daily Journal-- locate a section of your notebook to act as a journal (reminder, for credit you must use sentences and paragraphs with supporting evidence/ questions/ examples/ facts) that you can turn in, use for writing ideas,  reflect on for personal growth; of course, and respond to the following:   What event in school most shaped your attitude toward education and school? How old were you?  Do you know why it had an effect on you?  Was it an emotional effect or from reason?

Meet, Complete, Record on Sheet : today we are working on goal setting.  We will use the SMART method.


Smart Goals -- Create three S.M.A.R.T. goals for yourself (first for this quarter, second for the year, and lastly for after graduation) and explain how each of them are S.M.A.R.T.  -- you should be able  to share them with the class. 




Do you get it? 
or    let me see!    1,   2,   3,  or 4:

1 = what are you talking about.

2= I'm confused.

3= I get most of it.

4= let's move on I got this!

The SMART goals are due Monday.

Consider-- a planning guide for college.  Have you begun a list of things to do for this year as a Junior??

11

Wednesday

Meet, Complete, Record on Sheet-- day 3:  keep in portfolio.

Create portfolio for classroom use.

Diagnostic Regents Exam--  keep in portfolio.

Due Monday for in class self evaluation.

Complete assignment for a 100%  do not copy-- you will cheat only yourself.

 

 

12

Thursday

Meet, Complete, Record on Sheet-- day 4:  keep in portfolio.

Diagnostic Regents Exam--  keep in portfolio.

 

 

13

Friday

Meet, Complete, Record on Sheet-- day 5:  keep in portfolio.

Diagnostic Regents Exam-- If you are not done, take it home, TURN IT IN to me or complete for HW due Monday-- (no typing). 

Due Monday for in class self evaluation.

Complete assignment for a 100%  do not copy-- you will cheat only yourself.

 

Done?  work on SMART GOALS for classroom display.

HW--   Did you have a logical sentence for each letter S.M.A.R.T.?   Sentences?  Neat?  Would you hang it on the classroom wall? 

BACK TO TOP

12

WEEK TWO

 

16

Monday

SIGN IN AND OUT WHEN PASSING TO AND FROM CLASSES  -- THE PASSING BOOK IS IN THE PORTFOLIO BOX

 

Smart Goals and  Diagnostic Regents Due 

Period in Class Literary Diagnostic  -- full credit for completing -- do not "borrow reminders or answers."

Notes:  What are the steps for exploring critical or essential questions?

Step 1--- What is the Critical Question?

Step 2--- What are the Key  Terms and explanations?

Step 3--- What are the Supporting Questions and answers?

 

Step 4--- What is the Main Idea answer?

 

Step 5--- How can we use the Main Idea?

 

Step 6--- Is there an Overall Idea?    Is there a real-world use?

17

Tuesday

1) Review Literary Diagnostic together

2) Move into Challenge Groups as assigned

3) Begin a notebook section for the unit Origins and Encounters with a focus on the following Essential Questions:

a. What functions do myths and traditional native American stories serve?

b. How does conflict arise and resolve when two different cultures meet?

Prepare to present your evidence based claims to the class Friday.

Reading--"World on a Turtles Back"  Orange Textbook page 25

Vote on reading choices  Do we read together or independently as a group?

 

 

 

 

Notes:  What are the steps for exploring critical or essential questions?

Step 1--- What is the Critical Question?

Step 2--- What are the Key  Terms and explanations?

Step 3--- What are the Supporting Questions and answers?

 

Step 4--- What is the Main Idea answer?

 

Step 5--- How can we use the Main Idea?

 

Step 6--- Is there an Overall Idea?    Is there a real-world use?

 

 

 

Return seats to rows.

18

Wednesday

 Continue working in challenge groups on the unit, Origins and Encounters, with the Essential Questions in Challenge groups:

What do you claim are answers to your questions?  What evidence do you have?  refer to pages quotations.

What are the steps for exploring critical or essential questions?

 

19

Thursday

 Work together to complete the reading and answer questions 1-6 on page 31 in complete sentences. Keep this in your notebook for future reference and prepare to present your E.B.C's and answers Friday with your group.  Select an image from the text to represent visually-- and be able to explain why you selected the image.

 

Exit Slip --- 1)   What functions do myths and traditional native American stories serve? 

20

Friday

 

Groups present their answers to the class everyone should listen for the best-- or additional answers.  Be able to share your art.

Journal --What would make this lesson about myth better (What did you like and dislike?)?

           

BACK TO TOP

13

WEEK THREE

 

23

Monday

 If you have not completed all parts of your Regents Diagnostic-- it will seriously impact your grade for this Quarter up to 1 full letter grade.  I will accept late diagnostics through Wednesday of this week.  COMPLETE IT AS WE REVIEW AND RETURN IT TO CLASS BY WEDNESDAY IF YOU MUST TAKE IT HOME-- left it at school?  A copy is here

 

Review Regents Diagnostic in class and calculate score for personal goals and place in portfolio.   

 

Comprehensive English Regents Examination

(Past Exams)

 

Calculate your score and turn in score sheet to me for credit. 

 

 

 24

Tuesday

 

 

Chief Joseph  I will Fight No More Forever 

RESPONSE ASSIGNMENT: SELECT ONE TO COMPLETE FOR A HW GRADE OPTIONS Here

 

Today we read a contemporary Native American text as we consider the essential question:  How does conflict arise and resolve when two different cultures meet?

Unpack the essential question we are going to answer:

How does conflict arise and resolve when two different cultures meet?

Use the supporting questions to make claims with evidence for presentations at the end of the period.

“The Man to Send Rain Clouds”  by Leslie Marmon Silko

To better understand the story,and the Essential Question, complete the two group assigned questions below. 

As you make claims from the text support your choice with evidence to share with the class and turn in:

 

GROUP 1 GROUP 2 GROUP 3 GROUP 4 GROUP 5
Why is Father Paul an outsider?

How does Silko use External  Conflict?
What are Father Paul's ambitions? Why can't he achieve them?

How does Silko use Internal Conflict?
What is the significance of the fact that these men gather the sheep before tending to their grandfather?

How does Silko use Indirect Characterization?
In what ways is the Native American community shown to be close to nature?

How does Silko use Symbolism?
Why does Louise want holy water sprinkled on Teofilo's body?

How does Silko use Irony?

 

Group presentations at the end of the class Wednesday.

Last chance to turn in Regents Diagnostic.

25

Wednesday

 

Today having read a contemporary Native American text as we consider the essential question: 

How does conflict arise and resolve when two different cultures meet?

 

Review and continue:

Recall, we unpacked the essential question we are going to answer-- if you need to look at those notes.  Consider unpacking the supporting main idea questions for your group to present at the end of the period.

 

Use the supporting questions to make claims with evidence-- see the  Evidence Based Claim Rubric for how you will be graded.

“The Man to Send Rain Clouds”  by Leslie Marmon Silko

To better understand the story, complete the two group assigned questions below.  As you make claims from the text support your choice with evidence to share with the class and turn in:

 

GROUP 1 GROUP 2 GROUP 3 GROUP 4 GROUP 5
Why is Father Paul an outsider?

How does Silko use External  Conflict?
What are Father Paul's ambitions? Why can't he achieve them?

How does Silko use Internal Conflict?
What is the significance of the fact that these men gather the sheep before tending to their grandfather?

How does Silko use Indirect Characterization?
In what ways is the Native American community shown to be close to nature?

How does Silko use Symbolism?
Why does Louise want holy water sprinkled on Teofilo's body?

How does Silko use Irony?

 

 

 

Return your group work to the group folders.

 

 

26

Thursday

 Presentations -- turn in your groups shared claim and evidence sheet for the three assigned questions:

Written (summative) assessment of Origins and Encounters unit essential questions:

a. What functions do myths and traditional native American stories serve?

b. How does conflict arise and resolve when two different cultures meet?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Begin unit:  Colony to Country.

Consider-- Do you believe that new born children are good and learn to be bad or bad and must be taught to be good?

 

 

 




Well, take note of the three Puritan Beliefs (textbook page 134-135) and consider the some origins of prejudice and other "interesting" ideas in “The Great Chain of Being” see IMAGE HERE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

What do we learn about life, morality and government in early American literature that helped to shape America?

 

Clue Do Review!

1. Ask a critical question.

2. Note and explain key words  (unpack the question-- vocabulary and supporting/main idea questions)

3. Search for supporting questions and answers (fiction and non fiction) and cite EBC.

4. Work out the main idea answer (to the supporting questions) and cite EBC.

5. Explore and connect the main idea within a related area/relate the idea to today’s world.

 



27

Friday

 

Continue unit:  Colony to Country.

Our Essential Questions for this unit:

How do collective fears affect a group or individuals?

How do collective fears affect a groups?

 How do collective fears affect individuals?

To answer this question we are going to employ various examples of American Literature.

Daily Self Tracking: The Puritan Mission

Get into new challenge groups (where you challenge yourself to learn something new).  




Consider the three key Puritan beliefs:
Original Sin
Predestination
The Bible as Supreme Authority

Review notes as needed on the three Puritan Beliefs (textbook page 134-135) and “The Great Chain of Being” see IMAGE HERE.




What kind of government would such a people have?  The answer is ... THEOCRACY

 




      


Define “What is imagery?” – in order to discuss the term as a class and how it helps us understand a text.      Consider-- What is the setting for the text? 














What is the purpose of the text?

How would this speech be delivered?








Your Task is as easy as 1,2,3! 
Counts as two HW assignments due today (Monday the latest) for presentation to the class:


1. As a group, peruse (read carefully) excerpts (parts) from the speech “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God”  and as a group pick out a different excerpt of powerful imagery for each person in your group. 

2. Each person writes their unique image in the form of a quotation from the text (use quotation marks and cite according the author's last name and page number).

3. Now,   draw it in a poster for the class as Edward’s audience might imagine it with a “public service announcement"   in Edward’s style (as if we lived in a Puritan Theocracy).




Each individual should have a written response that includes the page number, why they picked the paragraph, and an explanation of the imagery.  Write this or attach it to the poster.  Individuals should be prepared to present their work at the end of the period or as time allows.
 

Tools:

Text, this website, discussion, paper and crayons.

 

 

 

BACK TO TOP

14

WEEK FOUR   *INTERIM REPORTS*

 

30

MONDAY

 

The Puritan Mission assignment is due: Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God 

 

 

 

 

 

Begin Literature Circles toward reading The Crucible.

 

Explanations of Literature Circles process.

 

Your grade is based on preparation, contribution, as well quality of your assignments as evidenced in the quality and neatness in the completion of you packet, the ability to actually follow the written directions in the packet, observation in class.

 

Groups assign roles for the first act.

 

 Each member should be prepared to...  meet in literature circles and complete a Shared Notes sheet Here some groups in the past have prepared ahead -- making copies of their notes to share around their group-- way to go!

 

 

Tools: The Class Textbook, Lit Charts, Shmoop, Vocabulary.com

Strategic Instruction Model, or SIM

Common Errors in English
Grammar and Writing Online Assistance
Strategic Instruction Model, or SIM
OWL
TOEFL | English Grammar for Students

 

 

If you are not prepared your participation grade will suffer as your participation in the group is time sensitive and related to everyone's need for your contribution!

 

 

 

 

 

1

TUESDAY

 An introduction to The Crucible

Unit: Colony to Country

Our Essential Questions for this unit:

How do collective fears affect a group or individuals?

becomes--

How do collective fears affect a groups?

 How do collective fears affect individuals?

We will prepare to start reading The Crucible. Reminder Literature Circles Role--- you will meet at the end of each act.  Your Literature Circles Packet will be collected ate the end of the play after the last meeting.

How can we predict the setting and time period will influence the plot?

·         Briefly go over / review the introduction on page 163-- What is a crucible?  When was the play written?

 ·         Select parts (on board) for reading-- write your name next to the part you would like to read for participation credit

·         Read play as class as teacher models the roles for the first reading and take notes as per your role.

 

 

 

Literature Circles Role Reminders

Your grade is based on preparation, contribution, as well quality of your assignments as evidenced in the quality and neatness in the completion of you packet, the ability to actually follow the written directions in the packet, observation in class.

2

WEDNESDAY

 Review important events, and character traits from previous day’s reading.

Who is accused of what in the play?

What happens when someone is accused of something?

 

·         Select parts (on board) for reading-- write your name next to the part you would like to read for participation credit

·         Read play as class as teacher models the roles for the first reading and take notes as per your role.

 

 

 

 

Literature Circles Role Reminders

Your grade is based on preparation, contribution, as well quality of your assignments as evidenced in the quality and neatness in the completion of you packet, the ability to actually follow the written directions in the packet, observation in class.

3

THURSDAY

 Parent Teacher Open House 7-9pm 

Would you agree to say something that wasn’t true in order to save your family?

·         Select parts (on board) for reading-- write your name next to the part you would like to read for participation credit

·         Read play as class as teacher models the roles for the first reading and take notes as per your role.

 

Reading act I.

Literature Circles Role Reminders

 

4

FRIDAY

 

Complete Act I

View Film version of Act I and work on literature circles notes.

 

BACK TO TOP

15

 

WEEK FIVE

 

7

MONDAY

 

Get textbook and take out your Literature Circles Packet.

Daily Self Tracking:  Meet in roles groups and prepare to share.

Literature Circles Role Reminders

Discussion Directors meet together:  ask open questions about the text and challenge assumptions using EBC.

Illuminators  locate passages by page number of important passages (explains why) using EBC.

Connectors point out how things in the book are related to the "real" world using EBC.

Word Watchers point out words that are interestingly used or odd in the text or have multiple meanings using EBC.

Illustrators might create chart, diagram (e.g. Venn Diagram), map, or picture using EBC and be able to explain why they created it.

Summarizers might describe what was learned by close reading (carefully looking at the text using EBC) and said by each person in the discussion using EBC.

At end of act be prepared to...

Meet in Literature Circles: complete group assigned role to share with your group tomorrow.

Your grade is based on preparation, contribution, as well quality of your assignments as evidenced in the quality and neatness in the completion of you packet, the ability to actually follow the written directions in the packet, observation in class.

 

8

TUESDAY

 

Meet in literature circles and complete a Shared Notes sheet Here some groups are preparing ahead and making copies of their notes to share around-- way to go!

If you are not prepared your participation grade will suffer as your participation in the group is time sensitive and related to everyone's need for your contribution!

If you are not prepared your participation grade will suffer as your participation in the group is time sensitive and related to everyone's need for your contribution!

 

Meet in literature circles and complete a Shared Notes sheet Here some groups are preparing ahead and making copies of their notes to share around-- way to go!

9

WEDNESDAY

 

If more time is needed… Meet in Literature Circle groups to finish completing shared notes sheet.

Hand in shared notes sheet for a grade!

Meet in Literature Circle groups to assign new roles for Act 2.

*Needs to be a Discussion Director

 

Begin Reading Act 2.

10

   THURSDAY

 

Select parts (on board) for reading-- write your name next to the part you would like to read for participation credit

Read play as class as teacher models the roles for the first reading and take notes as per your role.

 

Reading Act 2

Role Reminders

11

FRIDAY

 

Select parts (on board) for reading-- write your name next to the part you would like to read for participation credit

Read play as class as teacher models the roles for the first reading and take notes as per your role.

 

Reading Act 2

Role Reminders

BACK TO TOP

16

WEEK SIX

 

14

MONDAY

 OFF

15

TUESDAY

 

            SPIRIT WEEK BEGINS OCTOBER 21

           

            MONDAY, OCT 21 -   PINK DAY

            TUESDAY, OCT. 22 - TWIN DAY

            WEDNESDAY, OCT. 23 - SOPHISTICATED DAY

            THURSDAY, OCT. 24 -     CLASS T- SHIRT DAY

            FRIDAY, OCT. 25 -      GREEN AND WHITE DAY    

Group assigned roles should be completed and ready to share with Literature Circles.

Meet in Literature Circles and complete a Shared Notes sheet Here .

If you are not prepared your participation grade will suffer as your participation in the group is time sensitive and related to everyone's need for your contribution!

16

WEDNESDAY

  Periods 1-4 complete sharing.  Select new roles for next reading.

 

Testing Day 1/2 day

Per 8
2600

 

Per 7

2604

 

 

Per 1

2511

 

 

I'm a Proctor A      M. Hall Proctor B  Room 1304  for 9r Explore

17

THURSDAY

  Computer Lab--  First Quarter Project

Period 1, 7 and 8 meet in  1102 Mr. Galanaugh 

Warning-- read the directions for important details!

NO SNEAKERS, SPORTS, DRESSES, SOCIAL MEDIA, OR GAMES-- SHOW ME YOUR COMPLETED PAPER BEFORE DOING SOMETHING ELSE!  On task non disruptive behavior is an easy "A" for part of your project grade.

18

FRIDAY

  Computer Lab   First Quarter Project

Don't Waste time!

You must complete this on your own!

 

Period 1 meets in 1102 Mr. Galanaugh 

Period 7 and 8 meet in 2118 Mr. Galanaugh 

BACK TO TOP

17

WEEK SEVEN

 

21

MONDAY

 

          SPIRIT WEEK BEGINS OCTOBER 21

           

            MONDAY, OCT 21 -   PINK DAY

            TUESDAY, OCT. 22 - TWIN DAY

            WEDNESDAY, OCT. 23 - SOPHISTICATED DAY

            THURSDAY, OCT. 24 -     CLASS T- SHIRT DAY

            FRIDAY, OCT. 25 -      GREEN AND WHITE DAY    

 

 

Finish working in Literature Circles to compete shared notes sheet for Act 2 or as directed.

In groups, choose new roles for the reading of Act 3.  

Parts written on board – Volunteers choose parts to read for participation grade. Begin

Reading Act 3 of The Crucible.

Reading Act III

22

TUESDAY

 

Parts written on board – Volunteers choose parts to read for participation grade.

Review important information from yesterday’s reading.

Continue Reading Act 3.

Remember to take notes as we are reading. The notes should be helpful to you when you meet with your Literature Circles.

23

WEDNESDAY

 

Parts written on board – Volunteers choose parts to read for participation grade.

Review important information from yesterday’s reading.

Continue Reading Act 3.

Remember to take notes as we are reading. The notes should be helpful to you when you meet with your Literature Circles.

Break into groups to play a Jeopardy game based on Act 3.

Tomorrow-- Period 1, 7 and 8 meet in  1211  Mr. Galanaugh

24

THURSDAY

 Reminder-- On task non disruptive behavior is an easy "A" for part of your project grade!

 

 

 

NO SNEAKERS, SPORTS, DRESSES, SOCIAL MEDIA, OR GAMES-- SHOW ME YOUR COMPLETED PAPER BEFORE DOING SOMETHING ELSE!  On task non disruptive behavior is an easy "A" for part of your project grade.

First Quarter Project  Project Due the following Thursday.

Period 1, 7 and 8 meet in  1211  Mr. Galanaugh

Computer Lab

25

FRIDAY

 

 

 

NO SNEAKERS, SPORTS, DRESSES, SOCIAL MEDIA, OR GAMES-- SHOW ME YOUR COMPLETED PAPER BEFORE DOING SOMETHING ELSE!  On task non disruptive behavior is an easy "A" for part of your project grade.

First Quarter Project Project Due the following Thursday.

 

 

 

Period 1, 7 and 8 meet in  1211  Mr. Galanaugh

Computer Lab

BACK TO TOP

18

 

WEEK EIGHT

 

28

MONDAY

 Reading Act IV

29

TUESDAY

 Computer Lab

Period 1 meets in  1102   Mr. Galanaugh

Periods 7 and 8 meet in  1211  Mr. Galanaugh

NO SNEAKERS, SPORTS, DRESSES, SOCIAL MEDIA, OR GAMES-- SHOW ME YOUR COMPLETED PAPER BEFORE DOING SOMETHING ELSE!  On task non disruptive behavior is an easy "A" for part of your project grade.

 

First Quarter Project Project Due the following Thursday.

Done?  Visit  SAT PREPARATION

30

WEDNESDAY

  Computer Lab

Period 1, 7 and 8 meet in  1211  Mr. Galanaugh

NO SNEAKERS, SPORTS, DRESSES, SOCIAL MEDIA, OR GAMES-- SHOW ME YOUR COMPLETED PAPER BEFORE DOING SOMETHING ELSE!  On task non disruptive behavior is an easy "A" for part of your project grade.

First Quarter Project Project Due the following Monday!

Done?  Visit  SAT PREPARATION

31

THURSDAY

  Computer Lab  PROJECT DUE!

Period 1, 7 and 8 meet in  1211  Mr. Galanaugh

NO SNEAKERS, SPORTS, DRESSES, SOCIAL MEDIA, OR GAMES-- SHOW ME YOUR COMPLETED PAPER BEFORE DOING SOMETHING ELSE!  On task non disruptive behavior is an easy "A" for part of your project grade.

First Quarter Project Project Due date extended to the following Monday November 4th! Done?  Visit  SAT PREPARATION

November 1

FRIDAY

  Complete reading The Crucible!

BACK TO TOP

19

 

WEEK NINE

4

MONDAY

Computer Lab  Meet in 1211  First Quarter Project due.  Review the work for the last week of the first quarter.

Visit  SAT PREPARATION

Prepare for take home test due Friday.

5

TUESDAY

 Final meeting for Literature Circles on Act IV of THE CRUCIBLE

Please turn in the packet today with four completed roles for a notebook test grade by Wednesday.

6

WEDNESDAY

 Literature Circles Packet is due. You should have four completed roles according to the directions found in the packet.

Our Essential Questions for this unit:

How do collective fears affect a group or individuals?

becomes--

1) How do collective fears affect a groups?

 2) How do collective fears affect individuals?

Consider  for a test grade due before Friday:

View media about the power of fear and a "Crucible" style world complete this worksheet with evidence based claims for extra credit.

or

Using evidence based claims, write a multiple paragraph response to the two questions we have studied using any of the following:

 The Crucible, McCarthyism, The Red Scare, research on witch hunts in America and in history.

While you may talk with others about this assignment, it is up to you to not copy another person's response.  In that case, both tests will be invalid.

 

Work on Summative Test on essential questions from Wednesday.

You may use the alternative media presented in class as part of your evidence based claims in your paragraph.

 

 

7

THURSDAY

 

Work on Summative Test on essential questions from Wednesday.

You may use the alternative media presented in class as part of your evidence based claims in your paragraph.

 

8

FRIDAY

 

 

Work on Summative Test on essential questions from Wednesday due today.

You may use the alternative media presented in class as part of your evidence based claims in your paragraph.

 

 All work is due.

 

 End of First Marking Period

THE GRADE BOOK IS CLOSED  GRADES ARE BEING RECONCILED THROUGH THE NEXT WEEK  GRADES ARE SUBJECT TO FINAL ASSIGNMENTS!

BACK TO TOP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 21

SECOND QUARTER:

 

WEEK ONE

 

11  closed

MONDAY

 

12

TUESDAY

 

What is the American Dream? 

Consider all of the elements that go into our goals and dreams... as well as the influence of time.

Consider the following:

  1. Why do people from other countries immigrate to America?
  2. When we talk about "The American Dream", what do we mean? What are some of the obstacles to achieving the American Dream?
  3. Which groups of people have had trouble attaining "The American Dream"? There are a variety of acceptable responses to this question. E.g. Native Americans, Irish Americans, African Americans, Chinese Americans, and Japanese Americans, as well as the poor and women. 
  4. Given the obstacles that some Americans have to overcome, what makes the American Dream appealing?



Write a poem about the American Dream  or a lost dream  in the style of Whitman using the literary devices such a imagery, repetition, free verse, and  the theme of the American Dream -- NO RHYME. (counts as two HW grades due THURSDAY).

STEP 1     Brainstorm  include the brainstorm (prewriting)
STEP 2     Write the poem-- incorporate the four  literary devices and underline them.  Identify the device -- next to your use of it in parentheses .



Bring ID or books you owe to pick up A Raisin in the Sun   on Thursday -- Bring to class daily each day after as it counts as HW grade.

13

WEDNESDAY

Today we will take a look at Langston Hughes and his poetry as a reflection of American Experience.

GET INTO YOUR GROUPS AND GET A TEXTBOOK


Given the obstacles that some Americans have to overcome, what makes the American Dream appealing?  

 

Consider the poem you are writing about the American Dream or a lost dream in the style of Whitman (NO RHYME) then ---

read "I Too" page 925,  "Harlem" page 926, and "The Weary Blues" page 927.

In your groups, come up with as many connections to the following poems as you are able to find: Be sure to give one example for each of the poems with an explanation of the connection you might find.

Consider "I hear America Singing"  page 397 and "I too"--

or

 "Harlem" and "I sit and look out" page 399-- 

or

"Song of Myself" page 400 and "The Weary Blues"

Do you think that these poets agree in style or meaning?  Who came first?  Did one poet read another? 

Write your answers and the members of your group on a sheet of paper and turn it in by the end of the period.

14

THURSDAY

 We pick up A Raisin in the Sun   in the library.   Bring to class daily each day after--counts as HW.

What is the Harlem Renaissance (--in under 4 minutes)?

Read "A Dream Deferred" by Langston Hughes, the preface to A Raisin in the Sun. 

The preface to A Raisin in the Sun is the poem "A Dream Deferred"

  1. What is the purpose of a preface?
  2. Why do you think Hansberry chose this poem as her preface?

Define the following "defer" and "fester"-- check with a partner to see if your definition agrees with theirs.

 

 

15

FRIDAY

 

A Raisin in the Sun is part of the Harlem Renaissance and an example of how the American Dream has either changed or remained the same over time-- what do you claim?

Define the following "defer" and "fester"-- check with someone to see if your definition agrees with theirs.


Reading A RAISIN IN THE SUN---   Begin reading log where you keep a  Character Analysis Chart so that you can answer the following:

Keep a  Character Analysis Chart so that you can answer the following:

How is the American Dream expressed in each member of the Younger family: Walter, Ruth, Lena (Mama), and Beneatha?

1) Dreams and Goals

2) Obstacles

3) Racism and Sexism

 

Reading A RAISIN IN THE SUN---  let's take parts and begin reading!

BACK TO TOP

22

WEEK TWO

 

18

MONDAY

 

How is the American Dream expressed in each member of the Younger family: Walter, Ruth, Lena (Mama), and Beneatha?

1) Dreams and Goals

2) Obstacles

3) Racism and Sexism

 

Reading A RAISIN IN THE SUN---  let's take parts and begin reading!

19

TUESDAY

 

 

Reading A RAISIN IN THE SUN---  let's take parts and begin reading!

20

WEDNESDAY

 

 

Reading A RAISIN IN THE SUN---  let's take parts and begin reading!

21

THURSDAY

 

 

Reading A RAISIN IN THE SUN---  let's take parts and begin reading!

22

FRIDAY

 

Keep a  Character Analysis Chart so that you can answer the following:

How is the American Dream expressed in each member of the Younger family: Walter, Ruth, Lena (Mama), and Beneatha?

1) Dreams and Goals

2) Obstacles

3) Racism and Sexism

 

Reading A RAISIN IN THE SUN---  let's take parts and be done with reading!

BACK TO TOP

23

WEEK THREE

 

25

MONDAY

 TAKE HOME QUIZ DUE!

Character Analysis Chart  and   Three Claims with evidence for EACH of the following: how is the American Dream expressed in each member of the Younger family Walter, Ruth, Lena (Mama), and Beneatha?

1 Obstacles

 Consider the following-- Racism and Sexism

QUIZ Grade!

26

TUESDAY

 Complete last act of play.

HAPPY HANUKKAH AND HAPPY THANKSGIVING!

27

WEDNESDAY

 Thanksgiving

28

THURSDAY

 Thanksgiving

29

FRIDAY

 Thanksgiving

BACK TO TOP

24

WEEK FOUR

 

2

MONDAY

 Complete A Raisin in the Sun-- Select literary device for "Literary Elephants"

THE REGENTS EXAM REQUIRES YOU TO DISCUSS THE WAY THE AUTHOR USES LITERARY DEVICES.  THE FOLLOWING IS AN EXERCISE IN WRITING THIS WAY WITH EVIDENCE BASED CLAIMS.

Literary "Elephants" for Regents Review:

Sign up for a literary element (no class duplicates), then through the textbook, research it and why authors might use it to develop an aspect of their writing and lastly, provide an example.

Then, transfer what you learned to a "Literary Elephant" poster for classroom display. 
Below the "elephant," clearly write the element,  define it in the body,  then most importantly--  

...in the space provided write how it is used and give an example.
Look up the term in the back of the textbook where it is indexed as well as for where it is defined.


Be creative and use color or additional drawing to help us remember the way the "elephant" is used by writers.
Be sure to put your name on your elephant!

If it is ready for classroom display at the end of class Tuesday you will get full credit.

3

TUESDAY

Below the "elephant," clearly write the element,  define it in the body,  then most importantly--  

...in the space provided write how it is used and give an example.
Look up the term in the back of the textbook where it is indexed as well as for where it is defined.


Be creative and use color or additional drawing to help us remember the way the "elephant" is used by writers.
Be sure to put your name on your elephant!

If it is ready for classroom display at the end of class Tuesday you will get full credit.

4

WEDNESDAY

Read “Chicago” p825  and answer questions 1, 2 and 3 on page 826. Then read “My City” page 941

 

When you are done and due tomorrow at the start of class:

On the page where you answered the questions above, write a 15 line (minimum) poem using three literary devices about today’s Manhattan—or your town.  Consider using the news, stories, legends, economics, demographics, employment as inspiration. This poem is due tomorrow.


 

5

THURSDAY

 Lab -- Work on Assignment

This is the assignment (print it here) :

Work alone or with no more than one other person and select any one of the main characters (including Travis and Asagai) in order to research both historical and modern Chicago from their perspective. Describe each character so that you can use them in relation to the seven dimensions below.

How do I start???

For example, imagine that I selected Walter Lee Younger.   I select which dimensions of his life I would like to research. I then have to research the life he had in Chicago from 1951-1961 and print out resources as evidence to incorporate into my poster (of course for extra credit - a 100% on a quiz grade--I will create a works cited page).  Then I research the conditions he would face in Chicago during the last decade and print out my evidence for the poster.  Then  identify similarities and differences for your presentation.  On Monday, assemble the poster for your presentation.  On Tuesday, give your presentation.

Chicago's South Side 1951-1961      to compare with      Chicago's South Side of 2001-2013

 

I will provide poster paper and glue sticks for us to assemble our research and then for you to present next week --

Accuracy and neatness of poster 25%,

Research on 1950's Chicago 25%, 

Research of today's Chicago 25%

Your presentation to the class 25%. 

Each counts as a HW assignment!

Here is the interactive assignment page.

Describe each character so that you can use them in relation to the seven dimensions below. Select four of the seven possible dimensions below conduct online research where you evaluate your sources to be sure they are credible and find images or facts.

1 Dreams, Hopes, and Plans (includes education, employment etc.)
2 Race and Pride (includes Racism and Segregation)
3 Family and Gender  Roles / Prejudice (includes sexism)
4 Poverty Suffering Dissatisfaction (includes employment statistics and opportunities)     
5 The Home and the "White Picket Fence" (define the "American Dream")
6 Choices and Sacrifice (includes one generation sacrificing for the next)
7 Religion, Giving, Social Work, Teaching

You may want to copy and paste the comparison chart below:

Walter, Ruth, Lena (Mama), Beneatha, Travis, and even Asagai.

Dimensions of Research

Chicago's South Side 1951-1961 

Chicago South Side of 2003-2013

1 Dreams, Hopes, and Plans (includes education, employment etc.)

 

 

 

 

 

2 Race and Pride (includes Racism and Segregation)

 

 

 

 

 

 

3 Family and Gender  Roles / Prejudice (includes sexism)

 

 

 

 

 

 

4 Poverty Suffering Dissatisfaction (includes employment statistics and opportunities)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5 The Home and the "White Picket Fence" (define the "American Dream")

 

 

 

 

 

 

6 Choices and Sacrifice (includes one generation sacrificing for the next)

 

 

 

 

 

 

7 Religion, Giving, Social Work, Teaching

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Internet Search Help Options Here 

 

 

6

FRIDAY

Lab

Lab Work on Assignment

Here is the interactive assignment page.

MONDAY YOU MAY PREPARE FOR PRESENTATIONS to be given ON TUESDAY.

BACK TO TOP

25

WEEK FIVE    **Interim Reports**

 

9

MONDAY

PREPARE FOR PRESENTATIONS

YEAH!

Hang that Elephant! 

10

TUESDAY

 

Present to Class!

Accuracy and neatness of poster 25%,

Research on 1950's Chicago 25%, 

Research of today's Chicago 25%

Your presentation to the class 25%. 

Each counts as a HW assignment!

11

WEDNESDAY

Pending

Introduction to 2nd Quarter Project--  Writing a Critical Lens Literary Essay.

12

THURSDAY

 

Writing a Critical Lens Literary Essay.

13

FRIDAY

 

Writing a Critical Lens Literary Essay.

Essay is DUE Monday.

BACK TO TOP

26

 WEEK SIX

 

16

MONDAY

First part of project is due-- Literary Essay with a critical lens.

 

Presentation of posters.

17

TUESDAY

As part of our preparation for the Regents Exam, we are going to ask the essential question-- "How do authors in diverse traditions share the literary elements of characterization and symbolism?"

I am distributing construction paper. 
Fold your construction paper as shown to make strips of about 1.5 to 2 inches wide.

At this time of year there is one piece of literature that is ideal for use on the critical lens essay because of its prevalence in media as well as familiarity A Christmas Carol In class, notes on the reasons this text is awesome to use on the Critical Lens portion of the Regents Exam.  If you are absent you may read the text here A Christmas Carol.  Here are 23 versions of A Christmas Carol  Why is it so popular?


If you have been given
white, gold, or green you are tracking literary elements from the following list and a brief example from the text.

Do your best to find the following as each is present = Symbolism, Personification, Suspense, Foreshadowing, Flashback, Allusion, Metaphor, Simile, Epiphany, Dialogue, Imagery, Narrator.  

If you have any other color you are tracking characteristics of Ebenezer, provide brief evidence from the text.   

Indicate if the characteristic is positive or negative with a + sign or – sign.

When you have filled your paper you are ready for the last step we will do on Thursday/Friday.


Today we will explore the role of symbolism in dynamic and static characterization (for use on the NYS ELA Exam).  

Daily Journal- Is Walter a static or dynamic character?

Consider excerpts from  A Christmas Carol.


Continue to track your literary elements:
Consider Scrooge's own words:

``Are there no prisons?'' asked Scrooge.

``Plenty of prisons,'' said the gentleman, laying down the pen again.

``And the Union workhouses?'' demanded Scrooge. ``Are they still in operation?''

``They are. Still,'' returned the gentleman, `` I wish I could say they were not.''

``The Treadmill and the Poor Law are in full vigour, then?'' said Scrooge.

``Both very busy, sir.''

``Oh! I was afraid, from what you said at first, that something had occurred to stop them in their useful course,'' said Scrooge. ``I'm very glad to hear it.'' .... ``I wish to be left alone,'' said Scrooge. ``Since you ask me what I wish, gentlemen, that is my answer. I don't make merry myself at Christmas and I can't afford to make idle people merry. I help to support the establishments I have mentioned: they cost enough: and those who are badly off must go there.''

``Many can't go there; and many would rather die.''

``If they would rather die,'' said Scrooge, ``they had better do it, and decrease the surplus population. Besides -- excuse me -- I don't know that.''

``But you might know it,'' observed the gentleman.

``It's not my business,'' Scrooge returned. ``It's enough for a man to understand his own business, and not to interfere with other people's. Mine occupies me constantly. Good afternoon, gentlemen!''

What are Walters words that are similar?

 



18

WEDNESDAY

 

Today we will continue to explore the role of symbolism in dynamic and static characterization (for use on the NYS ELA Exam).  

Daily Journal- Is John Proctor a static or dynamic character?


Consider excerpts from  A Christmas Carol.


Continue to track your literary elements:

Consider Scrooge's own words: 

"But you were always a good man of business, Jacob," faltered Scrooge, who now began to apply this to himself.

"Business!" cried the Ghost, wringing its hands again. "Mankind was my business. The common welfare was my business; charity, mercy, forbearance, and benevolence, were, all, my business. The dealings of my trade were but a drop of water in the comprehensive ocean of my business!"

What does Walter believe?  Consider the "takers and the tooken?"

19

THURSDAY

 Today we will explore the role of symbolism in dynamic and static characterization (for use on the NYS ELA Exam).  

Daily Journal- Who is the Author of A Raisin in the Sun?


Work together to cut your construction paper into strips, 

Staple the strips into circles. 

Link all of the negative characteristics together with literary devices and then all of the positive characteristics together to form a chain representing Scrooge.

Hang literary chain up on wall.





20

FRIDAY

Review for Regents Exam

EXTRA CREDIT-- COMPARE AND CONTRAST EBENEZER WITH WALTER OR JOHN PROCTOR -- Come up with at least 7 similarities or differences!   Due First Day Back Next Year!


See you next year!

BACK TO TOP

27

 

WEEK SEVEN

 

6

MONDAY

 

 

Hope you had a great break! 

 

 

13 class days until the Regents Comprehensive English Exam  JANUARY 27  MONDAY Afternoon.
STATE LAW --NO CELL PHONES OR OTHER ELECTRONIC DEVICES IN THE BUILDING DURING EXAM AT ALL OR YOUR TEST WILL BE INVALID.

Review for Regents Exam:

The first part of the second quarter project was due Monday the 16th-- Literary Essay with a critical lens. 

Have you completed your essay?

At this point you need to complete the essay for review on Friday.  This review will count as 5 homework assignments and can not be completed without an essay actually present on Friday.

This is a serious exam and a serious review.  Not following directions will result in lower grades for the project as well as participation.  Assignments must be completed on time to be effective.

If you are absent on Friday, you will write another critical lens essay due Monday the 13th for HW credit using the following critical lens prompt:

“…the truth is often unpopular…”
—Adlai E. Stevenson
Commencement Address at
Michigan State University, June 8, 1958


Today, begin the reading portion of the project as directed. 

The paragraphs will also be due on Friday. 

 

Score above 93 and receive a box of cupcakes!)  Or 5 free no homework passes!

 

 

 

7

TUESDAY

 12  class days remain.   Delay Schedule: HERE

FROZEN!

Today, complete the reading portion of the project and begin the paragraphs #26 and #27. 

The paragraphs will also be due on Friday. 

This is a serious exam and a serious review.  Not following directions will result in lower grades for the project as well as participation.  Assignments must be completed on time to be effective.

Score on the Regents above 93 and receive a box of cupcakes!)  Or 5 free no homework passes!

8

WEDNESDAY

 11

Today, continue the reading portion of the project as directed. 

The paragraphs will also be due on Friday. 

This is a serious exam and a serious review.  Not following directions will result in lower grades for the project as well as participation.  Assignments must be completed on time to be effective.

9

THURSDAY

 10

Today, continue the reading portion of the project as directed. 

The paragraphs will also be due on Friday. 

The first part of the second quarter project was due Monday DECEMBER 16th-- Literary Essay with a critical lens. 

Have you completed your essay?

At this point you need to complete the essay for review on Friday.  This review will count as 5 homework assignments and can not be completed without an essay actually present on Friday.

 

If you are absent on Friday, you will write another critical lens essay due Monday the 13th for HW credit using the following critical lens prompt:

“…the truth is often unpopular…”
—Adlai E. Stevenson
Commencement Address at
Michigan State University, June 8, 1958

10

FRIDAY

 9

 

Review essay score and paragraph scores according to Mr. G's rubric.

This is a serious exam and a serious review.  Not following directions will result in lower grades for the project as well as participation.  Assignments must be completed on time to be effective.

If you are absent on Friday, you will write another critical lens essay due Monday the 13th for HW credit using the following critical lens prompt:

“…the truth is often unpopular…”
—Adlai E. Stevenson
Commencement Address at
Michigan State University, June 8, 1958

BACK TO TOP

28

WEEK EIGHT

 

13

MONDAY

 8 class days until the Regents Comprehensive English Exam  JANUARY 27  MONDAY Afternoon.
STATE LAW --NO CELL PHONES OR OTHER ELECTRONIC DEVICES IN THE BUILDING DURING EXAM AT ALL OR YOUR TEST WILL BE INVALID.

 

Review listening strategies.

Look at level 6 essays.

Regents Exam  (Past Exams)



14

TUESDAY

 7   ALL PARTS of Project are Due!    Regents listening passage review.

 

15

WEDNESDAY

6  Literary Review  

The Crucible  SHMOOP

16

THURSDAY

 5  Literary Review

A Raisin in the Sun  SHMOOP

17

FRIDAY

 

Stay Calm

REVIEW POETIC DEVICES FOR REGENTS EXAM

4 Class Days Remain

  WORTH 3 HW Grades due today !!!!

Identify 5 literary devices, what they do for that poem, and on the back the controlling idea --- what you think the poem was about or the author was trying to say.

 

 

 

BACK TO TOP

29

WEEK NINE

 

Off 20

MONDAY

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s Birthday -- Schools & Offices Closed

21

TUESDAY

 

Review Sheet Distributed   THE AUTHOR IS ARTHUR?


H. W. REGENTS EXAM MONDAY AFTERNOON  

Review   Literature @    SHMOOP 

REVIEW LITERARY DEVICE REVIEW SHEETS DISTRIBUTED IN CLASS

 

3 or 2??? Class days until the Regents Comprehensive English Exam  JANUARY 27  MONDAY Afternoon.
STATE LAW --NO CELL PHONES OR OTHER ELECTRONIC DEVICES IN THE BUILDING DURING EXAM AT ALL OR YOUR TEST WILL BE INVALID.



22

WEDNESDAY

 2

SCHOOL ???   REGENTS EXAM MONDAY AFTERNOON   Review @    SHMOOP

23

THURSDAY

 1   REVIEW

H. W. REGENTS EXAM MONDAY AFTERNOON  

Review   Literature @    SHMOOP 

REVIEW LITERARY DEVICE REVIEW SHEETS DISTRIBUTED IN CLASS

 

1??? Class days until the Regents Comprehensive English Exam  JANUARY 27  MONDAY Afternoon.
STATE LAW --NO CELL PHONES OR OTHER ELECTRONIC DEVICES IN THE BUILDING DURING EXAM AT ALL OR YOUR TEST WILL BE INVALID.

24

FRIDAY

  

REVIEW

H. W. REGENTS EXAM MONDAY AFTERNOON  

Review   Literature @    SHMOOP 

REVIEW LITERARY DEVICE REVIEW SHEETS DISTRIBUTED IN CLASS

 

Class days until the Regents Comprehensive English Exam  JANUARY 27  MONDAY Afternoon.
STATE LAW --NO CELL PHONES OR OTHER ELECTRONIC DEVICES IN THE BUILDING DURING EXAM AT ALL OR YOUR TEST WILL BE INVALID.






BACK TO TOP

210

 

WEEK TEN  Regents Week

 

27

MONDAY

 Comprehensive English  AFTERNOON SESSION

28

TUESDAY

 

29

WEDNESDAY

 

30

THURSDAY

 

31

FRIDAY

End of Second Marking Period

Welcome Mr. M!

How was the Regents Exam?

 

 

Due today-- 

On a separate sheet of paper, write a poem to be included in a Valentine's Day Card inside using five LITERARY DEVICES where you identify the literary devices.

Create a Valentine's Day Card with the poem inside.

Turn in both at the end of the period for credit-- place the poem inside the card when you turn it in (so you don't have to write your name on the card).

 

Happy Groundhog day... again!

BACK TO TOP

 

 

 

 

 

 31

 

THIRD QUARTER:

WEEK ONE

 

February 3

MONDAY

 SNOW DAY

 

 

4

TUESDAY



DELAYED OPENING:

Today we begin our exploration of Modernism in American Literature.


No grades are yet available. When I know I will let you know ASAP this week, please don't ask. As a courtesy I accepted late work.  The English department spent all of last week scoring midterms and other state exams.



The overarching essential questions we will be addressing as we approach our study of the Modern Age of American Literature are

  • How are individualism and alienation exemplified by the modernist character?
  • How are the social movements of the time period reflected in the characters?

As we focused on the Regents Exam we postponed an opportunity to continue our study of important aspects of American Literature. We now have an opportunity continue where we left off.

Martin Luther King, Jr., framed the goals and strategies of the Civil Rights Movement for a national audience, and with his message of nonviolent protest, he inspired ordinary African Americans to demand equal rights as American citizens.

To answer our questions we will focus on the individual men and women who embraced King’s message and advanced the Civil Rights Movement on a local level. By researching these people and the now historic places where they brought about change, students will discover how the simple act of sitting at a lunch counter in North Carolina could be considered revolutionary, and how, combined with countless other acts of nonviolent protest across the nation, it could lead to major legislation in the area of civil rights.

Our first question of study, which may lead us to other question --"What is Non Violent Protest?"

Let us build on this question together -- use the worksheet provided in class as a reminder of the Question Exploration Routine. 

We will use several sources to answer this question.

Be sure to support your findings with Evidence Based Claims (EBCs).

Begin Boycott



USE
Boycott and the Question Exploration Routine to answer the question-- "What is Non Violent Protest?"



5

WEDNESDAY

 

 SNOW DAY

6

THURSDAY

Today we continue our exploration of Modernism in American Literature.

The overarching essential questions we will be addressing as we approach our study of the Modern Age of American Literature are

  • How are individualism and alienation exemplified by the modernist character?
  • How are the social movements of the time period reflected in the characters?

As we focused on the Regents Exam we postponed an opportunity to continue our study of important aspects of American Literature. We now have an opportunity continue where we left off.

Martin Luther King, Jr., framed the goals and strategies of the Civil Rights Movement for a national audience, and with his message of nonviolent protest, he inspired ordinary African Americans to demand equal rights as American citizens.

To answer our questions we will focus on the individual men and women who embraced King’s message and advanced the Civil Rights Movement on a local level. By researching these people and the now historic places where they brought about change, students will discover how the simple act of sitting at a lunch counter in North Carolina could be considered revolutionary, and how, combined with countless other acts of nonviolent protest across the nation, it could lead to major legislation in the area of civil rights.

Our first question of study, which may lead us to other question --"What is Non Violent Protest?"

Let us build on this question together -- use the worksheet provided in class as a reminder of the Question Exploration Routine. 

 

Begin/ continue Boycott to answer the questions-- "What is Non Violent Protest?" 

7

FRIDAY

 

Continue Boycott to answer the questions-- "What is Non Violent Protest?" 

BACK TO TOP

32

WEEK TWO

 

10

MONDAY

 "Nonviolence is a powerful and just weapon. It is a weapon unique in history, which cuts without wounding and ennobles the man who wields it. It is a sword that heals." --- Why Can’t We Wait 1964

Reading in class together, "Coming of Age in Mississippi" --Building background on p. 609 and then answer 1,3,4,6 on p. 616--  DUE TODAY.

As enhancement view related historical information at the Eyes on the Prize website and define the Freedom Riders-- View Excerpts.

 

gin

  

11

TUESDAY

 

Reading in class together, "Coming of Age in Mississippi" --Building background on p. 609 and then work together to answer 1,3,4,6 on p. 616--  USE COMPLETE SENTENCES   Turn in at the end of class.

Using the worksheet Question Exploration Routine, you and up to one other person, will create a "handout" that can act as instructions for people to participate in a nonviolent protest you will be attending-- Do not mention specific causes or events-- this is worth 2 HW assignments and must be acceptable for display (due Friday).  

What kind of protest makes sense for a nonviolent protest??? Boycott??? not paying a bill??? Drag Racing???  What must happen?  Not eating Junk Food???  You must consider how it will be organized to answer the question!

Be sure that it addresses the most important aspects for participants—the ones that will be standing next to YOU.

 

12

WEDNESDAY

 

Parent teacher conferences-- periods 1-4 are in sesion.

 

Period 1 meet in 1211

Introduction to The 3rdQ Project:    2013 Twenty-Seventh Annual Poetry Contest

Today, complete a QEG on the following essential question using class resources
[your object as a 21st century learner is to try NOT to rely on Mr. G or Mr. M]:


How do I enter and win the MOST RECENT Walt Whitman Birthplace Association Annual Poetry Contest for my Third Quarter Project Grade?  READ ALL OF THE INSTRUCTIONS BELOW:

 

Complete a QEG as part of your project grade -- due with the project.

1 How many people to work together to complete the QEG?  Students decide!
2 How many people to submit a completed QEG for a grade?  Everyone!
3 Can we use the classroom Computer? Yes-- take turns and share what you are doing with the class!
4 Can we use the class textbook? Yes!
5 Are we using the computer lab?  YES!  ...  how can you find out without asking?
6 Are there special conditions for the project that are not part of the contest rules? Yes!  Click here.

http://www.waltwhitman.org/young-poets-contest/2014-poetry-contest-topic 

Question Exploration Routine

 

Open House is on Wed, Feb 12th, and will work the same as last year. Two sessions, 10:50 AM - 2:00 PM and the evening session, which will run from 7 PM - 9 PM. **All students will be dismissed after period 4, @ 10:03**

13

THURSDAY

 

Thursday, Feb 13, 2014

Period 1 in room 1102 & Periods 7 and 8 in room 1211

The 3rdQ Project:    2013 Twenty-Seventh Annual Poetry Contest

Today, complete a QEG on the following essential question using class resources
[your object as a 21st century learner is to try NOT to rely on Mr. G or Mr. M]:


How do I enter and win the MOST RECENT Walt Whitman Birthplace Association Annual Poetry Contest for my Third Quarter Project Grade?READ ALL OF THE INSTRUCTIONS BELOW:

 

Complete a QEG as part of your project grade -- due with the project.

1 How many people to work together to complete the QEG?  Students decide!
2 How many people to submit a completed QEG for a grade?  Everyone!
3 Can we use the classroom Computer? Yes-- take turns and share what you are doing with the class!
4 Can we use the class textbook? Yes!
5 Are we using the computer lab?  YES!  ...  how can you find out without asking?
6 Are there special conditions for the project that are not part of the contest rules? Yes!  Click here.

http://www.waltwhitman.org/young-poets-contest/2014-poetry-contest-topic

Question Exploration Routine

 

14

Midwinter Recess Begins

FRIDAY

 

Select the assignment you wish to work on:

Periods  7 and 8 in room 1211

Friday, Feb 14, 2014

Using the worksheet Question Exploration Routine, you and up to one other person, will create a "handout" that can act as instructions for people to participate in a nonviolent protest you will be attending-- Do not mention specific causes or events-- this is worth 2 HW assignments and must be acceptable for display (due Friday).  

What kind of protest makes sense for a nonviolent protest??? Boycott??? not paying a bill??? Drag Racing???  What must happen?  Not eating Junk Food???  You must consider how it will be organized to answer the question!

Be sure that it addresses the most important aspects for participants—the ones that will be standing next to YOU.

 

 

2013 Twenty-Seventh Annual Poetry Contest

Today, complete a QEG on the following essential question using class resources
[your object as a 21st century learner is to try NOT to rely on Mr. G or Mr. M]:


How do I enter and win the MOST RECENT Walt Whitman Birthplace Association Annual Poetry Contest for my Third Quarter Project Grade?READ ALL OF THE INSTRUCTIONS BELOW:

 

Complete a QEG as part of your project grade -- due with the project.

1 How many people to work together to complete the QEG?  Students decide!
2 How many people to submit a completed QEG for a grade?  Everyone!
3 Can we use the classroom Computer? Yes-- take turns and share what you are doing with the class!
4 Can we use the class textbook? Yes!
5 Are we using the computer lab?  YES!  ...  how can you find out without asking?
6 Are there special conditions for the project that are not part of the contest rules? Yes!  Click here.

http://www.waltwhitman.org/young-poets-contest/2014-poetry-contest-topic

Question Exploration Routine

 

BACK TO TOP

33

WEEK THREE

 

24

MONDAY

 Mississippi Memories Presentations

Freedom is not Free:
The Meridian Civil Rights Movement of the Mid-Sixties  HERE

 

HW: BRING ID CARDS AND LIBRARY BOOKS TO PICK UP NOVEL

25

TUESDAY

Meet in class and then go to Library to pick up text.  BRING THE Catcher in the Rye EVERY DAY.

The overarching essential / critical question we are seeking to answer for this next unit is -- How are individualism and alienation exemplified by the modernist and post-modern character?

Additional questions we will seek to answer in our search for an answer to the overarching question are as follows:

-What does it mean to belong to more than one community?
-How does one maintain hope in the face of adversity?
-To what extent does one construct their identity?
-How does art (be it writing or visual) act as a transformative power?
-How are the social movements of the time period reflected in the characters?

 

The first text we will use to explore this question is a frequently banned book:  Catcher in the Rye



An introduction to Catcher in the Rye  and reading in class


While reading, as part of your notes, track in your notebooks all the statements Holden makes about himself (characterization), especially those which begin with “I’m a . . .”  and I... . 

Examples:  “I’m a heavy smoker . . .” (Salinger 5)      “I act quite young for my age . . .” ( 9)           “I’m the most terrific liar you ever saw . . .” (16)


BE PREPARED FOR NEW GROUPS

 

 

 

 

 

Using the worksheet Question Exploration Routine, you and up to one other person, will create a "handout" that can act as instructions for people to participate in a nonviolent protest you will be attending-- Do not mention specific causes or events-- this is worth 2 HW assignments and must be acceptable for display (due next Friday -- March 7th).  

Be sure that it addresses the most important aspects for participants—the ones that will be standing next to YOU.

26

WEDNESDAY

 Catcher in the Rye


About JD Salinger-- archived copy here.

Notes/ discussion on Literary Movements for our study of American Literature:

           The following are characteristics of Modernism:

  • Marked by a strong and intentional break with tradition. This break includes a strong reaction against established religious, political, and social views.
  • Belief that the world is created in the act of perceiving it; that is, the world is what we say it is.
  • There is no such thing as absolute truth. All things are relative.
  • No connection with history or institutions. Their experience is that of alienation, loss, and despair.
  • Championship of the individual and celebration of inner strength.
  • Life is unordered.
  • Concerned with the sub-conscious.

Known as "The Lost Generation" American writers of the 1920s Brought Modernism to the United States. For writers like Hemingway and Fitzgerald, World War I destroyed the illusion that acting virtuously brought about good.

The following are characteristics of Post-Modernism:

An even more problematic term than modernism, in its most general sense it refers to late-20th century artistic trends that develop out of modernism (so it includes the elements of modernism) , often using in its construction the cultural condition resulting from capitalism (commercially driven aspects of culture). 

Some characteristics may be waves of Intertextuality (or relationships with other texts), disconnected images and various juxtaposed styles, as seen in television commercials and music videos, or in advertisements in magazines or on the street.  (Think of all the commercials you witness in one commercial break, and then think of how connected and disconnected they are from one another, the only linking frames of reference being your blue-black screen and their desire to sell you something.) 

In this sense, post-modernism is essentially fragmentary, and does away with traditional approaches to depth, coherence, originality and authenticity in favor for a mélange of signs. 

 If modernism tried to excavate and forge meaning out of the world using myths, symbols, narrative and formal complexity, post-modernism embraces the seemingly incoherent and plays with it, using its own means to create something new that reflects its own condition (i.e. self-reflexivity). 

This is by no means a complete definition of post-modernism, as the term, like its means, seems to always be in flux and is easily adapted to different situations.

27

THURSDAY

 Cacher in the Rye

The overarching essential / critical question we are seeking to answer for this next unit is -- How are individualism and alienation exemplified by the modernist and post-modern character?

(Review Notes and Checklist)

Read in groups as assigned and complete assigned roles in your Literature Circles.

OPPORTUNITIES FOR ENRICHMENT:  SEE Mr. M or Mr. G if you are reading the entire text! Complete four "COUNSELING" notes >here<

28

FRIDAY

 

The overarching essential / critical question we are seeking to answer for this next unit is -- How are individualism and alienation exemplified by the modernist and post-modern character?

(Review Notes and Checklist)

Read in groups as assigned and complete assigned roles in your Literature Circles.

OPPORTUNITIES FOR ENRICHMENT:  SEE Mr. M or Mr. G if you are reading the entire text! Complete four "COUNSELING" notes >here<

BACK TO TOP

34

WEEK FOUR

 

March 3

MONDAY

 

The overarching essential / critical question we are seeking to answer for this next unit is -- How are individualism and alienation exemplified by the modernist and post-modern character?

(Review Notes and Checklist)

Read in groups as assigned and complete assigned roles in your Literature Circles.

THE DEADLINE FOR THE LITERATURE CIRCLES PACKET FOR YOUR ASSIGNED SECTION IS THE START OF CLASS ON TUESDAY MARCH 11th

PRESENTATIONS WILL BE ON THAT WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY

OPPORTUNITIES FOR ENRICHMENT:  SEE Mr. M or Mr. G if you are reading the entire text! Complete four "COUNSELING" notes >here<

4

TUESDAY

 

The overarching essential / critical question we are seeking to answer for this next unit is -- How are individualism and alienation exemplified by the modernist and post-modern character? 

(Review Notes and Checklist)

THE DEADLINE FOR THE LITERATURE CIRCLES PACKET FOR YOUR ASSIGNED SECTION IS THE START OF CLASS ON TUESDAY MARCH 11th

PRESENTATIONS WILL BE ON THAT WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY

Read in groups as assigned and complete assigned roles in your Literature Circles.

HW MEET IN COMPUTER LAB

5

WEDNESDAY

 Wednesday, Mar 5, 2014

Per 1 1102

Per 7  2120

Per 8  2120

 

2013 Twenty-Seventh Annual Poetry Contest

Today, complete a QEG on the following essential question using class resources
[your object as a 21st century learner is to try NOT to rely on Mr. G or Mr. M]:


How do I enter the   the Walt Whitman Birthplace Association Annual Poetry Contest for my Third Quarter Project Grade?

Are there special conditions for the project that are not part of the contest rules? Yes!  Click here.

 

Complete a QEG as part of your project grade -- due with the project.

http://www.waltwhitman.org/young-poets-contest/2014-poetry-contest-topic

Question Exploration Routine

 

6

THURSDAY

 Thursday, Mar 6, 2014

Third Quarter Project Click here  DUE MONDAY

Per 1 1102

Per 7  2120

Per 8  2120

Third Quarter Project Click here  DUE MONDAY

DONE WITH ALL PARTS OF THE PROJECT?  Prepare for your presentations next week or work on your reading and Lit. circles packet.

 Third Quarter Project Click here  DUE MONDAY

 

7

FRIDAY

 

Third Quarter Project Click here  DUE MONDAY  

DONE WITH ALL PARTS OF THE PROJECT?  Prepare for your presentations next week or work on your reading and Lit. circles packet.

 Third Quarter Project Click here  DUE MONDAY

THE DEADLINE FOR THE LITERATURE CIRCLES PACKET FOR YOUR ASSIGNED SECTION IS THE START OF CLASS ON TUESDAY MARCH 11th

PRESENTATIONS WILL BE ON THAT WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY

How are individualism and alienation exemplified by the modernist and post-modern character?

(Review Notes and Checklist)

Read in groups as assigned and complete assigned roles in your Literature Circles.

OPPORTUNITIES FOR ENRICHMENT:  SEE Mr. M or Mr. G if you are reading the entire text! Complete four "COUNSELING" notes >here<

 Catcher in the Rye


About JD Salinger-- archived copy here.

Third Quarter Project PROJECT DUE DUE DUE DUE DUE Click here DUE MONDAY

Things to know about the Project, The Contest, and Walt Whitman’s Style


 

1) ONE COPY OF YOUR POEM (formatted for submission 50%)

2) A SECOND COPY OF YOUR POEM (where devices and elements are identified 25%),

3) THE NEATLY COMPLETED QEG or steps on paper—even if you worked with others ( 25%)  IF YOU DO NOT HAVE A QEG-- USE THE STEPS ON A SEPARATE SHEET OF PAPER-- see below.

THE DEADLINE FOR THE CONTEST IS NOT THE DEADLINE TO GIVE THE PROJECT TO ME!

All parts of the project are due at the start of class Monday.

 

Step 1 -- What is the Critical Question?

How do I enter the   the Walt Whitman Birthplace Association Annual Poetry Contest for my Third Quarter Project Grade?

 

Step 2 -- What are the Key  Terms and explanations?

List what you do need to know in the essential question or details provided? 

 

Step 3 -- What are the Supporting Questions and answers?    

List  questions do you need to answer before you can complete the project.  How will YOU find the answers by doing research, discussion with peers, or reading?

 

Step 4 -- What is the Main Idea (Critical Question) answer?    

 

Step 5 -- How can we use the Main Idea?    

Identify or list what you will do with the answer in school.

 

Step 6 -- Is there an Overall  Idea? Is there a real-world use?

Identify or list what you will or might do with the answer in life!

 

BACK TO TOP

35

WEEK FIVE

 

10

MONDAY

YOU MUST READ TO SOLVE PROBLEMS.  WHEN YOU ASK ME A QUESTION AND IT IS POSSIBLE YOU HAVE NOT READ-- EXPECT ME TO ASK YOU TO READ IT AND TELL ME EXACTLY THE POINT YOU ARE UNSURE.

Anything else is not helping you.  Having low expectations of you is NOT helping you.  I LOVE to help students who will try... even the littlest bit.  Reading directions in HS is not a real burden.  Think about it.  I can't chew your food for you-- so why would I be able to think for you?  YOU MUST THINK-- and no, it's not always easy.

Third Quarter Project due at start of class.

1) ONE COPY OF YOUR POEM (formatted for submission 50%)

2) A SECOND COPY OF YOUR POEM (where devices and elements are identified 25%),

3) THE NEATLY COMPLETED QEG or steps on paper—even if you worked with others ( 25%)  IF YOU DO NOT HAVE A QEG-- USE THE STEPS ON A SEPARATE SHEET OF PAPER-- see below.

If it is not in at the start of class I can not guarantee it will be submitted to the contest-- there are real world deadlines.

 

Complete Literature Circles Packet for assigned chapters by group.

DONE???   Work on presentation.  ALL GROUP MATERIALS MUST REMAIN IN CLASS IN YOUR GROUP FOLDERS.


TUESDAY

 

Prepare for presentation of your assigned chapters.

ALL GROUP MATERIALS MUST REMAIN IN CLASS IN YOUR GROUP FOLDERS.

12

WEDNESDAY

 

PRESENTATIONS

13

THURSDAY

 

PRESENTATIONS AND MODERNISM

Be prepared for the  Summative assessment  (test) for Catcher in the Rye and Modernism.

14

FRIDAY

Summative assessment  (test) for Catcher in the Rye and Modernism.

Thanks MR. M!

BACK TO TOP

36

 

WEEK SIX

 

17

MONDAY

 

Summative assessment  (test) for Catcher in the Rye and Modernism / Using  Finding Forrester.

 

18

TUESDAY

Course Selection Presentation

19

WEDNESDAY

 



Summative assessment  (test) for Catcher in the Rye and Modernism / Complete  Finding Forrester assignment.

Answer questions assigned relating to Modernism and Post-Modernism.






20

THURSDAY

 SPRING!

Summative assessment  (test) for Catcher in the Rye and Modernism / Complete  Finding Forrester assignment.

Answer questions assigned relating to Modernism and Post-Modernism for test grade.

21

FRIDAY

 

Today we will begin to study the connections between civil rights and women's rights in America.

How does employing our knowledge of female stereotypes help us see author's purpose or bias?


Why Education?
Marriage Preparation: 1950's Style

Course selection??? 1950?
Why Study Home Economics? (1955)


Careers?
1950s Education On "Women"


Discuss-- 

What stereotypes are revealed in the films?
Should a woman take the name of her husband when they are married?    WHY? 
 



Cinderella, Rapunzel, Little Red, Sleeping Beauty... What can they tell us about the the origins of stereotypes?

In your group, rewrite one of these stories and change all of the genders for reading in class next week. 

Identify any stereotypes you find as part of your presentation and what is unusual about the roles of females as portrayed in the text.

What is the author's purpose ("lesson to be learned") or bias revealed in the text?









 


BACK TO TOP

37

WEEK SEVEN

 

24

MONDAY

Course Selection for next year:    Course (Curriculum) Guide 

***ONLINE SCHEDULING TUTORIAL***

 

 

Per 1    1102

Per 7 and 8   2118

CHECK THIS OUT IN THE NEWS!

Barbie in a "Swimsuit Issue" what might this say about stereotype and  sexism?

CHECK THIS OUT IN THE NEWS!

 

 

The following is due Friday for display and counts as four HW assignments!

 

Research (you may use the textbook or other sources) and create a full page 8*11 or larger "Advertising Page / Poster" for a "rest cure" (or elixir / snake oil to help in giving the cure) for a 19th century woman.

What should it include?

1. Symptoms of female "hysteria" (19th century) 25%  Search Google & here  and here

2. Treatments for "hysteria" 25%

3. Positive outcomes of treatment 25%

4. Be ready for publication and on time using proper English and appropriate for class display 25%  (recall our focus is on suffrage).

 

Do this in the format of an ad you might see in the news or a magazine of the time (19th century). It might be selling the benefits of the rest cure for a modern woman of the 1800's- what would this perfect woman value? Is it her husband that is buying the cure?

 

 

Check out the following---

 

Silas Weir Mitchell and the rest cure--

Weir Mitchell (1829–1914), the American neurologist, renowned for his work on causalgia, was also interested in hysteria. He first encountered it in soldiers during the civil war.

In civilian practice when faced with patients with neurosis and hysteria he developed his “rest cure”. It was based, he said, on moral and physical components described in his book Fat and blood; the title reflected his experience that women with hysteria were often thin and anaemic. In addition to rest he insisted on removing the patient from their environment, asking them to write their life history, and using exercise, electrical stimulation, and a nutritious diet. In his hands, a rest cure was a success, perhaps owing to his patients’ immense respect and faith in him. But Weir Mitchell was wise enough to anticipate and thereby prevent what we now label illness behaviour:

“...to lie abed half the day and sew a little, and read a little, and be interesting and excite sympathy, is all very well, but when they are bidden to stay in bed a month, and neither to read, write nor sew, and to have one nurse—who is not a relative—then rest becomes for some women a rather bitter medicine and they are glad enough to accept the order to rise and go about when the doctor issues a mandate which has become pleasantly welcome and eagerly looked for.”

Attending a lady, sick unto death, he dismissed his assistants from the room then soon left himself. Asked of her chances of survival he remarked:

“Yes she will run out of the door in two minutes; I set her sheets on fire. A case of hysteria.”

His prediction thankfully proved correct.

“I urged, scolded and teased and bribed and decoyed along the road to health; but this is what it means to treat hysteria.”

---Historical note  from the JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association):

 

 

 

 

 

This excerpt is from the book Complaints and Disorders  pages 32-40 describe treatment.

Sample ad:

 

Image search for "rest cure" here   for elixir here and snake oil here

Old News here  ---try looking for images here

 

 

 

 

25

TUESDAY

 

Per 1    1211

Per 7 and 8   2118

CHECK THIS OUT IN THE NEWS!

Barbie in a "Swimsuit Issue" what might this say about stereotype and  sexism?

CHECK THIS OUT IN THE NEWS!

The following is due Friday for display and counts as four HW assignments!

 

Research (you may use the textbook or other sources) and create a full page 8*11 or larger "Advertising Page / Poster" for a "rest cure" (or elixir / snake oil to help in giving the cure) for a 19th century woman.

What should it include?

1. Symptoms of female "hysteria" (19th century) 25%  Search Google & here  and here

2. Treatments for "hysteria" 25%

3. Positive outcomes of treatment 25%

4. Be ready for publication and on time using proper English and appropriate for class display 25%  (recall our focus is on suffrage).

 

Do this in the format of an ad you might see in the news or a magazine of the time (19th century). It might be selling the benefits of the rest cure for a modern woman of the 1800's- what would this perfect woman value? Is it her husband that is buying the cure?

Done???

Work on your Grimm's Fairy Tale for Friday

26

WEDNESDAY

 

Per 1    1211

Per 7 and 8   2118

CHECK THIS OUT IN THE NEWS!

Barbie in a "Swimsuit Issue" what might this say about stereotype and  sexism?

CHECK THIS OUT IN THE NEWS!

Work on your Grimm's Fairy Tale  /  and complete your advertisement for Friday

27

THURSDAY

 


Work on your Fairy Tale presentations in groups for presentation tomorrow.  Worksheet due Monday

Our Essential Question:

How do oppression and social limitations affect people's attainment of The American Dream?*  …is it the same for men and women?  …Is the dream the same over time???  Is the dream the same as in the fairy tales?

 

*Hey, what is The American Dream Mr. G?  Simply, The American Dream is a dream of how people can live their lives (the “American” just means “about living in America”).

Cinderella, Rapunzel, Little Red, The Frog King, Sleeping Beauty... What can they tell us about the origins of stereotypes?

Your job is to rewrite the story and change all of the gender. 20%

1) You may embellish these original Grimm’s Fairy Tales – the language may be made modern but the time period and setting should be the same as the original.  There should be no change in sexual orientation. 20%

2) In your preparation, explain any challenges you faced in converting the genders. 20%

3) What is the author's purpose ("lesson to be learned") or personal bias revealed in the text?  20%

4) After reading, you should point out any stereotypes revealed in your story that are taught to children today. 20%

5) For extra credit, as part of your presentation, create a poster / collage for your story suitable for classroom display. Worth a 100% quiz grade!



28

FRIDAY

 

 Fairy Tale Presentations / Worksheet due Monday

SNAKE OIL "REST CURE" Advertisement due!

BACK TO TOP

38

WEEK EIGHT

 

 31

MONDAY

 

Read or hear "The Story of An Hour"  (also in textbook page 783-785) - as there is a surprise ending please do not share this with others in other periods!



Once read--  What is your initial reaction?   On a separate sheet of paper write your name and # 1 Why do you think she reacted the way she did?   Put your name on top-- leave space to Brainstorm.



Move into pairs or groups of three and consider the following critical / essential question:

 

How does employing our knowledge of 19th century female stereotypes allow us to see the author's purpose in “The Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin (textbook page 783-785)? 

 

On a separate sheet of paper complete a  Question Exploration Routine.


Examine the text together and consider-- how might a woman feel about this story?  How might a man feel about her story? What clues did the author offer the reader?  In a group, do a close reading to come up with supporting questions.





APRIL 1

TUESDAY

 

So just for a minute, think about a decision your mom made while you were growing up. Thought of something? OK, now try answering these questions:

  1. What was the decision? How did your mom's decision impact you?
  2. Do you think it was a good decision? Did she have any other options?
  3. How does she feel about her decision?
  4.  Do you know? Does she drop any hints?

 

 

 

Essential question:

How do oppression and social limitations affect people's attainment of the American dream?

 

1) Toward the essential question--  the group decides out loud or quiet reading being on task is this week's participation grade!

 

"The Yellow Wallpaper"  p763        GROUP 1

"Seventeen Syllables"  p788             GROUP 2

"I Stand Here Ironing"   p806         GROUP 3

"In the American Society"  p877      GROUP 4

"Winter Dreams" p840                    GROUP 5

2) Complete a worksheet tracking based on the following:

          

Female dreams and reality (Obstacle &  Society’s View)    Male dreams  and reality (Obstacle &  Society’s View)  

 

EBC--  Select five quotations for both female and male where you identify their Dream or the Reality they must face and how the society they live in would view the character’s action / choice/ belief (the ABC's) in the face of any obstacles. 

 

3) Work together to create a found poem using the text where each person in the group contributes three lines and reads their part to the class.  1 HW

 

 

 

 

 

Be prepared to use this sheet as part of final assessment for the essential question.

Essential Question: How do oppression and social limitations affect people's attainment of the American dream?    

 

 

 

2

WEDNESDAY

 

Essential question:

How do oppression and social limitations affect people's attainment of the American dream?

 

 

How do oppression and social limitations affect people's attainment of the American dream?

3

THURSDAY

 

Essential question:

How do oppression and social limitations affect the people's attainment of the American dream?

 

Work together to create a found poem (Found Poem Instructions) using the text where each person in the group contributes at least three lines and reads their part to the class.  1 HW (Due by end of class Friday).

 

 

 

 

How do oppression and social limitations affect people's attainment of the American dream?

4

FRIDAY

 

Essential question:

How do oppression and social limitations affect people's attainment of the American dream?

 

Using the reading and your worksheet respond to the essential question  "How do oppression and social limitations affect the people's attainment of the American dream?" incorporating at least one quotation in a short essay for a notebook test grade.   Due at the end of class.

 

How do oppression and social limitations affect people's attainment of the American dream?

End of Third Marking Period

BACK TO TOP

39

 

FOURTH QUARTER:

 

 

 41

WEEK ONE

7

MONDAY

 

 Introduction to the 4th Q   Poetry Project 







Create  10 HAIKU :
 
Five Haiku on the the following topics (barbeque, taking a test, summer, silence, the beach)

and five of your own devising for a total of ten due Friday.

 

 

 

 

8

TUESDAY

 

Women and the American Dream

Essential Question:  How do oppression and social limitations affect the people's attainment of the American dream?

 

 

 

FILM STUDY

Mona Lisa Smile

On a separate sheet of paper complete 3 of any of the 14 tasks for the film study using the study guide (where not specified, respond in paragraph format)

AND  any  one  of  the  Focus / Enrichment Questions located below

  Mona Lisa Smile – Film Study Options using the study guide are Here.

 

 

 

Focus / Enrichment Questions

1.    What has changed the way we perceive gender roles? What has not changed?

2.    How has our society’s power structure affected gender relations?

3.    What role do the media play in perpetuating gender stereotypes?

4.    How has women’s inequality been established/enforced throughout American history?

5.    How has the media’s perception of body image affected women’s body image?

6.    How has women’s body image been molded by the media over time?

7.    In what ways have women’s rights evolved over time?

8.    In what ways have gender roles evolved over time and how do they impact daily lives?

9.    Why have women been historically excluded from political thinking and roles?

10.  How is women’s involvement in politics limited by gender/societal expectations?

11.  What’s the connection between expected societal roles for women and the level of respect/power they’re issued?

12.  How have American women impacted social and political issues globally?

13.  How has clothing and appearance of women changed over time? Is there a relationship between the change and their political roles?

14.  How have women’s professional roles developed over time?

15.  What role has marriage played in the lives of women over time?

16.  How has women’s role in politics changed throughout history? How has politics changed due to women?

17.  What is the connection between women meeting appearance ideals/expectations and their success/power in society?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional Warm-up as needed.

 

9

WEDNESDAY

 

FILM STUDY

Mona Lisa Smile

On a separate sheet of paper complete 3 of any of the 14 tasks for the film study using the study guide (where not specified, respond in paragraph format)

AND  any  one  of  the  Focus / Enrichment Questions located below

  Mona Lisa Smile – Film Study Options using the study guide are Here.

10

THURSDAY

 

FILM STUDY

A renaissance painting?

Mona Lisa Smile

On a separate sheet of paper complete 3 of any of the 14 tasks for the film study using the study guide (where not specified, respond in paragraph format)

AND  any  one  of  the  Focus / Enrichment Questions located below

  Mona Lisa Smile – Film Study Options using the study guide are Here.

11

FRIDAY

 

COMPLETE FILM STUDY

Mona Lisa Smile

On a separate sheet of paper complete 3 of any of the 14 tasks for the film study using the study guide (where not specified, respond in paragraph format)

AND  any  one  of  the  Focus / Enrichment Questions located below

  Mona Lisa Smile – Film Study Options using the study guide are Here.

 


A renaissance painting? 

As you view Mona Lisa Smile and the painting  answer the following:  why has the movie taken it's title from a renaissance painting? "CLICK HERE to see it."  For extra credit, cite at least 3 specific examples from the film as part of your notes on this unit and be prepared to turn them in before vacation.

 

 

 

 

 

14 MONDAY





15 TUESDAY Spring Recess Begins






BACK TO TOP

42

 

WEEK TWO

 

21

MONDAY

Essential Question:   Is the American Dream an illusion?

As part of answering this question we are going to read Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller.

We pick up the play from the Library today and begin the play tomorrow. 

HW Ask your parents if you don't know the answer to the question, "What is the 'rat race'?"

 

Today... Work on your poetry project.

Complete five Cinquain on any subject:

 

Line 1:

two syllables (subject or noun) 

Line 2:

four syllables
(usually adjectives) that describe line 1

Line 3:

six syllables
(usually action verbs) that relate to line 1

Line 4:

eight syllables
(usually feelings or a complete sentence) that relates to line 1

Line 5:

two syllables
(synonym or its antithesis of line 1 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

22

TUESDAY

THE QER:

For enrichment:  See the end of the QER Instructions below:

 

On a separate sheet of paper---

Step 1 -- What is the Critical Question?  

Is the American Dream an illusion? 

Step 2 -- What are the Key Terms and explanations?

Begin with the question, the work we are reading, discussion, and brainstorming to identify vocabulary we can use to explore the topic.

Step 3 -- What are the Supporting Questions and answers?    

HAVE AT LEAST FIVE (5).

The answers to these questions are the EVIDENCE of any claim you make!

HAVE AT LEAST FIVE (5).

Are there questions that arise as we look at the vocabulary or as we examine the media / literature and even have class discussion???  Leave space to answer these.  Use these questions and answers as paragraphs in any writing assignment you have  (EBC)!

 

Step 4 -- What is the Main Idea answer for the Critical Question?    

What idea does the critical question focus on?  What have we learned based on the answers to the supporting questions?

Step 5 -- How can we use the Main Idea?     

What knowledge or perspective (s) can we take as a result of our exploration?  How would you introduce or summarize the answer to the question in a brief paragraph?

Step 6 -- Is there an Overall  Idea? Is there a real-world use?

How can we use this new knowledge based on our evidence and reflection?

For enrichment:  What questions or areas of research does the answer to this question lead you to and why?  How would you propose to answer the question you propose???

 

 

23

WEDNESDAY

Essential Question:   Is the American Dream an illusion?

What does the senior shirt actually mean?   Is it really a "Jungle" out there?   HOW?  Survival?

24

THURSDAY

 

Essential Question:   Is the American Dream an illusion?

 What similarities are there between Willie and Holden?

View Act I to resolve role of flashback?  Is it all flashback?  Is it not flashback?

IS IT ILLUSION?

25

FRIDAY

Complete a one page autobiographical essay on your choice of two topics according to the details in the following link:

Guidelines for Autobiography

BACK TO TOP

43

WEEK THREE

 

28

MONDAY

 Monday, Apr 28, 2014

Period 1 meets in 1102

Period 7 & 8  meet in 2118

Work on your autobiography due Friday:

Guidelines for Autobiography

This I Believe

 

29

TUESDAY

 Tuesday, Apr 29, 2014

1 meets in  1211

7 & 8 meet in 2120

Work on your autobiography due Friday:

Guidelines for Autobiography

This I Believe

DONE?

4th Q   Poetry Project 

 

 

 

30

WEDNESDAY

 Wednesday, Apr 30, 2014

 1 meets in 1211

 7 & 8 meet in 2120

Work on your autobiography due Friday:

Guidelines for Autobiography

This I Believe

DONE?

4th Q   Poetry Project 

MAY 1

THURSDAY

 

Essential Question:   Is the American Dream an illusion?

As part of answering this question we continue to read Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller.

On a separate sheet of paper---

Step 1 -- What is the Critical Question?  

Is the American Dream an illusion? 

Step 2 -- What are the Key Terms and explanations?

Begin with the question, the work we are reading, discussion, and brainstorming to identify vocabulary we can use to explore the topic.

Step 3 -- What are the Supporting Questions and answers?    

HAVE AT LEAST FIVE (5).

The answers to these questions are the EVIDENCE of any claim you make!

HAVE AT LEAST FIVE (5).

Are there questions that arise as we look at the vocabulary or as we examine the media / literature and even have class discussion???  Leave space to answer these.  Use these questions and answers as paragraphs in any writing assignment you have  (EBC)!

 

Step 4 -- What is the Main Idea answer for the Critical Question?    

What idea does the critical question focus on?  What have we learned based on the answers to the supporting questions?

Step 5 -- How can we use the Main Idea?     

What knowledge or perspective (s) can we take as a result of our exploration?  How would you introduce or summarize the answer to the question in a brief paragraph?

Step 6 -- Is there an Overall  Idea? Is there a real-world use?

How can we use this new knowledge based on our evidence and reflection?

For enrichment:  What questions or areas of research does the answer to this question lead you to and why?  How would you propose to answer the question you propose???

 

2

FRIDAY

 

Essential Question:   Is the American Dream an illusion?

As part of answering this question we continue to read Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller.

On a separate sheet of paper---

Step 1 -- What is the Critical Question?  

Is the American Dream an illusion? 

Step 2 -- What are the Key Terms and explanations?

Begin with the question, the work we are reading, discussion, and brainstorming to identify vocabulary we can use to explore the topic.

Step 3 -- What are the Supporting Questions and answers?    

HAVE AT LEAST FIVE (5).

The answers to these questions are the EVIDENCE of any claim you make!

HAVE AT LEAST FIVE (5).

Are there questions that arise as we look at the vocabulary or as we examine the media / literature and even have class discussion???  Leave space to answer these.  Use these questions and answers as paragraphs in any writing assignment you have  (EBC)!

 

Step 4 -- What is the Main Idea answer for the Critical Question?    

What idea does the critical question focus on?  What have we learned based on the answers to the supporting questions?

Step 5 -- How can we use the Main Idea?     

What knowledge or perspective (s) can we take as a result of our exploration?  How would you introduce or summarize the answer to the question in a brief paragraph?

Step 6 -- Is there an Overall  Idea? Is there a real-world use?

How can we use this new knowledge based on our evidence and reflection?

For enrichment:  What questions or areas of research does the answer to this question lead you to and why?  How would you propose to answer the question you propose???

 

BACK TO TOP

44

 WEEK FOUR

INTERIM REPORTS  (Due in last Friday)

5

MONDAY

Reminder, as mentioned in class, Autobiography is due with rough draft / brainstorming.

Reading DOAS

6

TUESDAY

 

Reading DOAS

7

WEDNESDAY

 

Complete a found poem using the play Death of a Salesman of a minimum of 20 lines due at the start of class Thursday.   DETAILS HERE

8

THURSDAY

 

 

Read through the end of the play.

On a separate sheet of paper---

Step 1 -- What is the Critical Question?  

Is the American Dream an illusion? 

Step 2 -- What are the Key Terms and explanations?

Begin with the question, the work we are reading, discussion, and brainstorming to identify vocabulary we can use to explore the topic.

Step 3 -- What are the Supporting Questions and answers?    

HAVE AT LEAST FIVE (5).

The answers to these questions are the EVIDENCE of any claim you make!

HAVE AT LEAST FIVE (5).

Are there questions that arise as we look at the vocabulary or as we examine the media / literature and even have class discussion???  Leave space to answer these.  Use these questions and answers as paragraphs in any writing assignment you have  (EBC)!

 

Step 4 -- What is the Main Idea answer for the Critical Question?    

What idea does the critical question focus on?  What have we learned based on the answers to the supporting questions?

Step 5 -- How can we use the Main Idea?     

What knowledge or perspective (s) can we take as a result of our exploration?  How would you introduce or summarize the answer to the question in a brief paragraph?

Step 6 -- Is there an Overall  Idea? Is there a real-world use?

How can we use this new knowledge based on our evidence and reflection?

For enrichment:  What questions or areas of research does the answer to this question lead you to and why?  How would you propose to answer the question you propose???

9

FRIDAY

 

View end of play

On a separate sheet of paper---

Step 1 -- What is the Critical Question?  

Is the American Dream an illusion? 

Step 2 -- What are the Key Terms and explanations?

Begin with the question, the work we are reading, discussion, and brainstorming to identify vocabulary we can use to explore the topic.

Step 3 -- What are the Supporting Questions and answers?    

HAVE AT LEAST FIVE (5).

The answers to these questions are the EVIDENCE of any claim you make!

HAVE AT LEAST FIVE (5).

Are there questions that arise as we look at the vocabulary or as we examine the media / literature and even have class discussion???  Leave space to answer these.  Use these questions and answers as paragraphs in any writing assignment you have  (EBC)!

 

Step 4 -- What is the Main Idea answer for the Critical Question?    

What idea does the critical question focus on?  What have we learned based on the answers to the supporting questions?

Step 5 -- How can we use the Main Idea?     

What knowledge or perspective (s) can we take as a result of our exploration?  How would you introduce or summarize the answer to the question in a brief paragraph?

Step 6 -- Is there an Overall  Idea? Is there a real-world use?

How can we use this new knowledge based on our evidence and reflection?

For enrichment:  What questions or areas of research does the answer to this question lead you to and why?  How would you propose to answer the question you propose???

BACK TO TOP

45

WEEK FIVE

 

12

MONDAY

On a separate sheet of paper---

Step 1 -- What is the Critical Question?  

Is the American Dream an illusion? 

Step 2 -- What are the Key Terms and explanations?

Begin with the question, the work we are reading, discussion, and brainstorming to identify vocabulary we can use to explore the topic.

Step 3 -- What are the Supporting Questions and answers?    

HAVE AT LEAST FIVE (5).

The answers to these questions are the EVIDENCE of any claim you make!

HAVE AT LEAST FIVE (5).

Are there questions that arise as we look at the vocabulary or as we examine the media / literature and even have class discussion???  Leave space to answer these.  Use these questions and answers as paragraphs in any writing assignment you have  (EBC)!

 

Step 4 -- What is the Main Idea answer for the Critical Question?    

What idea does the critical question focus on?  What have we learned based on the answers to the supporting questions?

Step 5 -- How can we use the Main Idea?     

What knowledge or perspective (s) can we take as a result of our exploration?  How would you introduce or summarize the answer to the question in a brief paragraph?

Step 6 -- Is there an Overall  Idea? Is there a real-world use?

How can we use this new knowledge based on our evidence and reflection?

For enrichment:  What questions or areas of research does the answer to this question lead you to and why?  How would you propose to answer the question you propose???

13

TUESDAY

 

14

WEDNESDAY

 

This is for a test grade due at the start of class Monday the 19th:

Read the end of the play The Requiem  and complete the eulogy (a eulogy is the speech given at the funeral / wake) assignment:

In the requiem, the Loman family alternately shows grief, anger, and confusion over Willy’s chosen mode of death. Linda, in particular, cannot understand why no one attends the funeral and why no one seems affected by her husband’s death. Biff and Charley, perhaps, come closest to understanding who Willy was and why he made the choice he made, while Happy is in furious denial. Write a eulogy
that either Biff or Charley might have read at Willy’s funeral. Eulogies should offer some insight into who Willy was as an individual and why he ultimately chose to take his own life. Your eulogy should be approximately one page in length and incorporating at least one of  the following questions:

1. How is the American Dream characteristic of American ideals and philosophy?

2. What was happening economically and socially in the United States in 1949? Was it fairly easy or difficult to get a job?

3.What was America’s standing in the world?

4.What is your definition of salesman? How is a salesman different from someone in another occupation? What attitudes do you think a salesman should have to be successful? What attitudes would hinder him?

5. What effect do the expectations of parents have on the behavior of their children? In what ways might parental expectations be beneficial? In what ways might they be detrimental?

6. What are the differences between the materialistic and the idealistic values associated with the American Dream?

15

THURSDAY

 Requiem  Work on test for Monday. 

16

FRIDAY

 

Work on test for Monday.

For extra credit on your test average-- compare and contrast Willy Loman With Christopher Gardner in a venn diagram with a minimum of 30 elements total.

 

You may refer to excerpts of Pursuit of Happyness or research online:

 

http://www.chrisgardnermedia.com/

BACK TO TOP

46

 

WEEK SIX

 

19

MONDAY

 

TEST DUE AT START OF CLASS.

Pattern Poems-- 

Three pattern poems of your choice of pattern, 10 lines, (e.g. ab ab cd cd) identify the pattern!--  a minimum of 15lines each due Friday.

4th Q   Poetry Project 

 

 

20

TUESDAY

Begin new unit (begins textbook p#1069)

War Abroad Conflict at Home: Change in the 1960’s

Essential Question

How did America change in the 1960's?

Focus Questions:

What problems from the 1950s did the youth movements of the 60s try to solve?
What legacy did the youth movements of the 60s leave modern America?
What are the causes of conflict?
What is the role of war in transforming American Society?
What does it mean to be patriotic?

 

You may work together to help each other make a list of characteristics for the decade1940-50 based on what you know and then make a list of characteristics for the decade 1960-70’s.

You may use the textbook pages 1070-1074.

After you make your list of characteristics, briefly describe the differences or changes in American society (beliefs / behaviors / attitude / values / dreams).  Due at the end of the period.




21

WEDNESDAY

Follow the directions in LINCS for each of the following words or terms defined by our research and be prepared for a quiz next week:

(Try https://www.google.com/  or http://www.vocabulary.com/  or http://www.shmoop.com/1960s/ )

Essential Vocabulary:

counterculture

free speech movement

activist

hippies/flower children

Student for Democratic Society

Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC)

Long Hot Summer

CORE

Freedom Riders

Kent State

Black Panthers

dehumanizing the enemy

fear of communism

the domino theory

Great Society

American Idealism

Voting Rights


22

THURSDAY

4th Q   Poetry Project 

The Sonnet.

Create two sonnets due Friday June 30th.

23

FRIDAY

 

Read “Letter from Paradise, 21’19N  157’ 52’ W”  by John Didon (see page 1096) in the textbook.

Recently the New York's September 11 Memorial Museum opened.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/05/14/us-usa-sept11-memorial-idUSBREA4D0RC20140514

Answer Questions 1-7 on page 1098 in complete sentences with evidence from the text.

BACK TO TOP

47

WEEK SEVEN

 

26 School Closed

MONDAY

 

27

TUESDAY

 

War Abroad Conflict at Home: Change in the 1960’s

Essential Question

How did America change in the 1960's?

Vietnam - Search and Destroy "History Channel"

Select one of the focus questions and respond in a paragraph with evidence from the documentary:

What problems from the 1950s did the youth movements of the 60s try to solve?
What legacy did the youth movements of the 60s leave modern America?
What are the causes of conflict?
What is the role of war in transforming American Society?
What does it mean to be patriotic?

 

          28

WEDNESDAY

 

Read “Why Soldiers Won’t Talk” page 1088 in the textbook.

Answer Questions 2-5 and #7 on page 1098 in complete sentences with evidence from the text.

Done?  Work on 4th Q   Poetry Project  due Monday the 9th

29

THURSDAY

 Documentary Excerpts -- The Sixties - The Years That Shaped a Generation  

PBS Here      Teacher stuff here.

Question Exploration Routine

 

Use page 1118 and the poem "At the Justice Department, November 15, 1969" with “Jerry Casale’s account of the shootings at Kent State” to Write a paragraph using evidence based claims from both the poem and the account on the following question:

Is it best for people to accept things the way they are and what they have, or should people always strive to better their world? 

Jerry Casale’s account of the shootings at Kent State Kent State Shootings - Ohio - Neil Young (1970)

 "I was a student, I was a member of SDS - an antiwar group called Students for a Democratic Society, trying to restore Democracy at a time when LBJ and Nixon were running roughshod over it. There were several antiwar groups. That protest that day where everybody got shot was a protest against the expansion of the Vietnam War into Cambodia. It was a secret expansion, Nixon had done it the night before and we found out about it the next day - the whole nation did. They did it without an act of congress, without passing any new law or having any meetings. It was completely unconstitutional, so we're out there at noon, about 3,500 students at Kent State were out there. The governor, who certainly was a pro-war kind of guy, Governor Rhodes, he had placed the National Guard inside the heating plant of the school the night before anticipating what would happen when the students found out about Cambodia. Not only did he do that, but he waited until about 9 am on May 4th to declare Martial Law, which suspends all first amendment rights of The Constitution, meaning that any assembly is automatically illegal, you're automatically committing a crime. These National Guardsmen poured out of the heating plant, surrounded the protesters, and with a bullhorn announced that Martial Law had been declared and that we were all going to jail. Everybody starts chanting and screaming and they start shooting tear gas and some of the more [brave] protesters, while they're coughing and choking and puking are trying to throw it back, but most of the kids were anywhere from 50 to 100 yards away from these lines of National Guardsmen with guns. Nobody believed that the guns were actually loaded with live ammo. They just suddenly formed a row. The first one knelt and the second one stood, and they just shot right into the crowd, shot at all of us, down the hill at all of us. The worst thing about it is that 2 of the 4 students killed weren't part of the demonstration, weren't part of an antiwar group. They'd just come out of class from the journalism building at that time and come out on their way to their next class and were looking at the protest, just seeing what the hell's going on, and they got killed. The bullets just went everywhere, it was like a scatter-gun approach, like shooting geese. A lot of the bullets went over the heads of the protesters and kept going straight down the hill. One of the kids that's paralyzed for life was getting into his car to leave campus after his class, and they shot him in the back. He was at least 200 yards away and wanted nothing to do with what was going on. It was shocking. It pretty much knocked any hippie that I had left in me right out of me that day.
I had been a member of the honors college and the only way I went to school was with a scholarship. My family was poor and I got a scholarship to go to school. What I had to do every year to earn my scholarship was work 3 months in the summer for the university admitting new students to the honors college, the incoming freshman, and helping them arrange their curriculum, taking them through the registration process. The summer before May 4th, I had befriended Jeffery Miller and Allison Krause, 2 honor students, and they turn out to be 2 of the 4 killed on May 4th. So I'd known both of them 9 months before this happened, and so when I realized that this girl on her stomach with a huge exit wound in her back with blood running down the sidewalk was Allison, I nearly passed out. I sat down on the grass and kind of swooned around and lied down. I was in shock, I couldn't move.
The government and the press tried to lie about what happened as well as they could. The fact that anybody knows what happened is amazing because they did such a good job of muddying it up and lying, it was amazing. The final chapter there was that the parents of the students who were shot and killed banded together and went on a class action suit against Governor Rhodes and the state of Ohio and the National Guard, and summarily lost across the board. These kids that were shot were 18 and 19 years old. 2 of them were 18 and 2 of them were 19. They lost because by law, no one was allowed to be having a protest once Martial Law was declared, and they threw it out of the court system. I don't think anyone wants to know the truth. It ruins the myth of freedom in America to find out how easily it can be gone."

 

 

 

 

30

FRIDAY

 

Essential Question

How did America change in the 1960's?

 Question Exploration Routine

Documentary Excerpts -- The Sixties - The Years That Shaped a Generation  

PBS Here

Complete Paragraph Due today.

Done?  Work on 4th Q   Poetry Project  due Monday the 9th

BACK TO TOP

48

WEEK EIGHT

 

June  2

MONDAY

 

DO NOT E-MAIL WORK TO ME!

ALL LATE WORK IS DUE BY YOUR CLASS PERIOD THIS FRIDAY.

Essential Question

How did America change in the 1960's?

 Documentary Excerpts -- The Sixties - The Years That Shaped a Generation  

PBS Here

Question Exploration Routine

 

Done?  Work on 4th Q   Poetry Project  due Monday the 9th

3

TUESDAY

 Computer Lab

DO NOT E-MAIL WORK TO ME!

ALL LATE WORK IS DUE BY YOUR CLASS PERIOD THIS FRIDAY.

Done?  Work on 4th Q   Poetry Project  due Monday the 9th

4

WEDNESDAY

 

DO NOT E-MAIL WORK TO ME!

ALL LATE WORK IS DUE BY YOUR CLASS PERIOD THIS FRIDAY.

Essential Question

How did America change in the 1960's?

 Documentary Excerpts -- The Sixties - The Years That Shaped a Generation  

PBS Here

Question Exploration Routine

5

THURSDAY

 Computer Lab

DO NOT E-MAIL WORK TO ME!

ALL LATE WORK IS DUE BY YOUR CLASS PERIOD THIS FRIDAY.

Done?  Work on 4th Q   Poetry Project  due Monday the 9th

6

FRIDAY

 Computer Lab

DO NOT E-MAIL WORK TO ME!

ALL LATE WORK IS DUE BY YOUR CLASS PERIOD NOW.

Done?  Work on 4th Q   Poetry Project  due Monday the 9th

BACK TO TOP

49

WEEK NINE

 

9

MONDAY

 

10

TUESDAY

 

11

WEDNESDAY

 Final Exam

If you miss two days of the final exam you are responsible to arrange for a legitimate note excusing you and to attend the school wide make up day during testing week.

12

THURSDAY

 

FINAL EXAM

If you miss two days of the final exam you are responsible to arrange for a legitimate note excusing you and to attend the school wide make up day during testing week.

 

13

FRIDAY

Last Day of Classes!

 

 

 

 

BACK TO TOP

410

WEEK TEN

 

16

MONDAY

 

17

TUESDAY

 

18

WEDNESDAY

 

19

THURSDAY

 

20

FRIDAY

 

 

BACK TO TOP

411

 

 

23

MONDAY

 

24

TUESDAY

 

25

WEDNESDAY

 

26 LAST DAY

THURSDAY

 

 27

FRIDAY

Conference Day