College Transition 2013-2014

 

 

 

Fourth Quarter   Follow link to right:    WEEK ONE, TWO, THREE, FOUR, FIVE, SIX, SEVEN, EIGHT,  NINE  Make-up / Finals/ Regents

 

FIRST QUARTER:

11

WEEK ONE

 

Work for the Week

September  9

Monday

 

Administrative "Stuff" and Introductions:

Compare rosters and schedules.  Some room changes were made after the walk through and others based on building/district needs. 

If students do not have schedules, write the students’ names on a piece of paper and send ONE student to Counseling Center to get a copy of the schedules. 

During period one, check to see that you have all of your core courses on your schedule: English, Social Studies, Math, Science, PE and LOTE.  (Students missing core classes should be directed to complete a Counseling Center appointment form during lunch period.)    I may not allow students who are not on my roster to remain in the classroom.  You will be sent to the Counseling Center to have your schedule verified. 

If a child appears on your roster, but no longer wishes to take the class based on personal preference, he should be directed to complete a Counseling Center appointment form during his lunch period.  Ms. Paolini will place the appointment cards in all lunch periods by a Staff Assistant post.  Students will be seen by grade level starting with the Seniors , then Juniors, Sophomores and Freshmen.  This process may take a few days, but it is the most efficient way to ensure that graduating Seniors get the classes they need to fulfill graduation requirements.  All underclassmen appointments will be set based on priority.  Counselors will make every effort to meet with students during their lunch period.

An introduction to my website dropthemouse.com

DISCUSSION ABOUT THE PARENT PORTAL AND MISSING ASSIGNMENTS  10 days from date turned in-- not from the due date. They can see attendance and a running grade book!  Did you do your HW?  How did you do on that quiz?  What is up with the participation?

    

 

Meet, Complete, Record on Sheet

Do you get it?  or    let me see!    1 2 3  or 4.

1 = what are you talking about.

2= I'm confused.

3= I get most of it.

4= let's move on I got this!

 

PORTFOLIOS -- a record of our improvement in writing and skills.

DAILY JOURNALS -- these are ideas we consider to help us focus on the lesson we are working on that day.

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS --these are questions we try to answer that form the center of a unit we study so that by the end of the unit we can respond thoughtfully and in a reasoned manner.

PASSING RECORD (Formerly the "late book")

10

Tuesday

 

Today you will identify and set personal goals and steps they you need to reach them.

Daily Journal-- locate a section of your notebook to act as a journal (reminder, for credit you must use sentences and paragraphs with supporting evidence/ questions/ examples/ facts) that you can turn in, use for writing ideas,  reflect on for personal growth; of course, and respond to the following:   What event in school most shaped your attitude toward education and school? How old were you?  Do you know why it had an effect on you?  Was it an emotional effect or from reason?

Meet, Complete, Record on Sheet : today we are working on goal setting.  We will use the SMART method.


Smart Goals -- Create three S.M.A.R.T. goals for yourself (first for this quarter, second for the year, and lastly for after graduation) and explain how each of them are S.M.A.R.T.  -- you should be able  to share them with the class.  Do you get it?  or    let me see!    1 2 3  or 4.

 

Consider-- a planning guide for college.  Have you begun a list of things to do for this year as a Senior??

11

Wednesday

Today you will revise goals as needed. Meet, Complete, Record on Sheet-- keep in portfolio.

Daily Journal-- How does a portfolio work?  Describe the steps you would take in using a  portfolio (a collection of your work) to make you a better writer.

Create portfolio for classroom use.

LITERARY DIAGNOSTIC ASSIGNMENT-- Due Monday for in class self evaluation.

Complete assignment for a 100%  do not copy-- you will cheat only yourself.

 



Done?  Complete Your SMART goals to hang on the classroom wall... you may work in groups in class-- due Monday.

Create portfolio for classroom use.

 

12

Thursday

 Meet, Complete, Record on Sheet:  keep in portfolio.

Diagnostic exam

13

Friday

 Meet, Complete, Record on Sheet-- day 5:  keep in portfolio.

Make up for diagnostic exam.

Complete Your SMART goals to hang on the classroom wall... you may work in groups in class-- due Monday.

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12

WEEK TWO

 

16

Monday

SIGN IN AND OUT WHEN PASSING TO AND FROM CLASSES  -- THE PASSING BOOK IS IN THE PORTFOLIO BOX

 

Today you will begin a personal mission statement to help you write your college autobiography or resume as part of the first quarter project.

SMART GOALS due for display place on my desk-- Do not throw out!

Copy essential question for the Daily Journal:  What is my life about?  What is really most important? 

An introduction to the College Transition First Quarter Project  due FRIDAY NOV 1st:

Complete part I of Personal Mission Statement as part of that project:

 

 A. Describe your ideal day. As mentioned in class, assume that you have enough money to live comfortably, a safe place to live, and enough to eat.  This is not about being practical (winning the lottery), It is designed to include as many sides of you and of your enthusiasms as possible: creative, competent, artistic, introverted, extraverted, athletic, playful, nurturing, contemplative, etc.

---- Consider: If you write about spending the day with your friends and cruising in a car -- you are actually saying that friendship and freedom are the things you value....

Summarize your answer into a paragraph of no more that 1/3 of a page.

Be able to turn in both your answer and paragraph at a later date-- no shortcuts.

Be prepared to share it with the class.

For your reference consider-- a planning guide for college.  Have you begun a list of things to do for this year as a senior?

17

Tuesday

 

Today, continue to work on your personal mission statement.

Copy essential question for the Daily Journal:   What values or beliefs do you really stand for?

B. Imagine yourself 132 years old and surrounded by your descendants and/or those descendants of your friends. You are in a warm and relaxed atmosphere (such as around a fireplace). What would you say to them is important in life? This is designed to access the values and principles that guide your life.

Summarize your answer into a paragraph of no more that 1/3 of a page.

Be able to turn in both your answer and paragraph at a later date-- no shortcuts.

Be prepared to share it with the class as part of an interview/speech assignment.

18

Wednesday

Today you will continue to work on your personal mission statement.

Copy essential question for the Daily Journal:  

What are you actually doing to live what your life is about and what you stand for?  and  What does effective communication look like?

C. Imagine that it is your 35th or 50th birthday (or another milestone in your life). You have been asked by national print media to write a press release about your achievements. Consider what you would want your family, friends, co-workers in your profession and in your community to say about you. What difference would you like to have made in their lives? How do you want to be remembered? This is designed to inventory your actions and accomplishments in all areas of your life.

Summarize your answer into a paragraph of no more that 1/3 of a page.

Be able to turn in both your answer and paragraph at a later date-- no shortcuts.

Be prepared to share it with the class as part of an introduction to public speaking as part of your interview.

19

Thursday

Introduction to Unit on Public Speaking:

Copy essential question for the Daily Journal:  What are common myths about stage fright? & What have you heard to do about it ?

Discuss:  What is Stage fright?  

Tips to overcome stage fright.

What is the difference between shyness and stage fright?

What are some tips to help overcome anxiety in general? 

If you have symptoms of stage fright did you fail? No. 

Super Problem? See me. 

The purpose of this unit is to practice our public speaking skills and improve from where ever we are... even if it is simply being able to stand in front of the class where you couldn't before.  Many people do not know how they speak in public-- it is a learning experience! No one is an expert!

No one will be forced to "get up or fail" not speaking however is slightly below average and this will be reflected in your grade.   But, if you do get up and speak according to the guidelines you will receive appropriate credit that will have a positive effect on your grade.

 

Today you will interview a person in the class you don't know well, take notes for a notecard, and prepare to introduce that person in a speech to the class using my questions HERE as well as their Personal Mission Statement. 

Begin on paper--  then move to notecards:
You can not write sentences on the notecard.  Your notecard is your ticket to talk.  In order to get an A or B, you must not mention the persons name you are introducing until the end of your speech.

This is for a notebook test grade.

HW-- Have your cards prepared each day until you present.  Once volunteers are exhausted, I will call on people.

 

 

20

Friday

Copy essential question for the Daily Journal: Why is it important for people to be able to communicate effectively?

Complete your interviews and prepare your notes for notecards.

In order to get an A or B, you must not mention the persons name you are introducing until the end of your speech.


If you need time complete your notecards but you may not interview while people are speaking.
 
For Extra Credit:   
Today is about preparation. 

Simply come up in front of the class and imagine or practice how you might begin- try reading several tongue twisters to the class here  OR extra for mad credit try a selection from one of my favorites -- Fox in Socks  your choice.

We will discuss our goal of eliminating rookie mistakes-- as we move to our goal where we speak to the back of the room, make eye contact around the room and not read, while creating a relaxed and genuine feeling as speaker.

As part of this process you will take noes on each speaker and observe things that worked well and things that distracted.

Participation is key to this part of class: Be positive, be respectful, be active and you will get the credit due.

Reminder--  The purpose of this unit is to practice our public speaking skills and improve from where ever we are... even if it is simply being able to stand in front of the class where you couldn't before.  Many people do not know how they speak in public-- it is a learning experience! No one is an expert!

No one will be forced to "get up or fail" not speaking however is slightly below average and this will be reflected in your grade.   But, if you do get up and speak according to the guidelines you will receive appropriate credit that will have a positive effect on your grade.

Be prepared to speak next week.

Need more time (due to absences etc. see me)

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13

WEEK THREE

 

23

Monday

 Speeches of introduction!

Notes on basics--  as reviewed in class.

E

V

BB

P

 24

Tuesday

Speeches of introduction!

Notes on basics--  as reviewed in class.

E

V

BB

P

25

Wednesday

 

Listen to several essays from This I Believe for ideas to write your own essay.

 Tell a story: Be specific. Take your belief out of the ether and ground it in the events of your life. Consider moments when belief was formed or tested or changed. Think of your own experience, work, and family, and tell of the things you know that no one else does. Your story need not be heart-warming or gut-wrenching—it can even be funny—but it should be real. Make sure your story ties to the essence of your daily life philosophy and the shaping of your beliefs.

Be brief: Your statement should be between 350 and 500 words. That’s about three minutes when read aloud at your natural pace.

Name your belief: If you can’t name it in a sentence or two, your essay might not be about belief. Also, rather than writing a list, consider focusing on one core belief, because three minutes is a very short time.

Be positive: Please avoid preaching or editorializing. Tell us what you do believe, not what you don’t believe. Avoid speaking in the editorial “we.” Make your essay about you; speak in the first person.

Be personal: Write in words and phrases that are comfortable for you to speak. We recommend you read your essay aloud to yourself several times, and each time edit it and simplify it until you find the words, tone, and story that truly echo your belief and the way you speak.

26

Thursday

 

Personal Essay or Auto Biography:

Listen to several essays from This I Believe for ideas to write your own essay.

 Tell a story: Be specific. Take your belief out of the ether and ground it in the events of your life. Consider moments when belief was formed or tested or changed. Think of your own experience, work, and family, and tell of the things you know that no one else does. Your story need not be heart-warming or gut-wrenching—it can even be funny—but it should be real. Make sure your story ties to the essence of your daily life philosophy and the shaping of your beliefs.

Be brief: Your statement should be between 350 and 500 words. That’s about three minutes when read aloud at your natural pace.

Name your belief: If you can’t name it in a sentence or two, your essay might not be about belief. Also, rather than writing a list, consider focusing on one core belief, because three minutes is a very short time.

Be positive: Please avoid preaching or editorializing. Tell us what you do believe, not what you don’t believe. Avoid speaking in the editorial “we.” Make your essay about you; speak in the first person.

Be personal: Write in words and phrases that are comfortable for you to speak. We recommend you read your essay aloud to yourself several times, and each time edit it and simplify it until you find the words, tone, and story that truly echo your belief and the way you speak.

Continue work on your projects.

 

27

Friday

 

Personal Essay or Auto Biography:

Listen to several essays from This I Believe for ideas to write your own essay.

 Tell a story: Be specific. Take your belief out of the ether and ground it in the events of your life. Consider moments when belief was formed or tested or changed. Think of your own experience, work, and family, and tell of the things you know that no one else does. Your story need not be heart-warming or gut-wrenching—it can even be funny—but it should be real. Make sure your story ties to the essence of your daily life philosophy and the shaping of your beliefs.

Be brief: Your statement should be between 350 and 500 words. That’s about three minutes when read aloud at your natural pace.

Name your belief: If you can’t name it in a sentence or two, your essay might not be about belief. Also, rather than writing a list, consider focusing on one core belief, because three minutes is a very short time.

Be positive: Please avoid preaching or editorializing. Tell us what you do believe, not what you don’t believe. Avoid speaking in the editorial “we.” Make your essay about you; speak in the first person.

Be personal: Write in words and phrases that are comfortable for you to speak. We recommend you read your essay aloud to yourself several times, and each time edit it and simplify it until you find the words, tone, and story that truly echo your belief and the way you speak.

Continue work on your projects.

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14

WEEK FOUR   *INTERIM REPORTS*

 

30

MONDAY

 

Personal Essay or Auto Biography:

Listen to several essays from This I Believe for ideas to write your own essay.  Students select essay topic to listen to for an example.

Tell a story: Be specific. Take your belief out of the ether and ground it in the events of your life. Consider moments when belief was formed or tested or changed. Think of your own experience, work, and family, and tell of the things you know that no one else does. Your story need not be heart-warming or gut-wrenching—it can even be funny—but it should be real. Make sure your story ties to the essence of your daily life philosophy and the shaping of your beliefs.

Be brief: Your statement should be between 350 and 500 words. That’s about three minutes when read aloud at your natural pace.

Name your belief: If you can’t name it in a sentence or two, your essay might not be about belief. Also, rather than writing a list, consider focusing on one core belief, because three minutes is a very short time.

Be positive: Please avoid preaching or editorializing. Tell us what you do believe, not what you don’t believe. Avoid speaking in the editorial “we.” Make your essay about you; speak in the first person.

Be personal: Write in words and phrases that are comfortable for you to speak. We recommend you read your essay aloud to yourself several times, and each time edit it and simplify it until you find the words, tone, and story that truly echo your belief and the way you speak.

Continue work on your  College Transition First Quarter Project  due FRIDAY NOV 1st:.

1

TUESDAY

 

 

Personal Essay or Auto Biography:

Listen to several essays from This I Believe for ideas to write your own essay.  Students select essay topic to listen to for an example.

Tell a story: Be specific. Take your belief out of the ether and ground it in the events of your life. Consider moments when belief was formed or tested or changed. Think of your own experience, work, and family, and tell of the things you know that no one else does. Your story need not be heart-warming or gut-wrenching—it can even be funny—but it should be real. Make sure your story ties to the essence of your daily life philosophy and the shaping of your beliefs.

Be brief: Your statement should be between 350 and 500 words. That’s about three minutes when read aloud at your natural pace.

Name your belief: If you can’t name it in a sentence or two, your essay might not be about belief. Also, rather than writing a list, consider focusing on one core belief, because three minutes is a very short time.

Be positive: Please avoid preaching or editorializing. Tell us what you do believe, not what you don’t believe. Avoid speaking in the editorial “we.” Make your essay about you; speak in the first person.

Be personal: Write in words and phrases that are comfortable for you to speak. We recommend you read your essay aloud to yourself several times, and each time edit it and simplify it until you find the words, tone, and story that truly echo your belief and the way you speak.

Continue work on your  College Transition First Quarter Project  due FRIDAY NOV 1st:.

2

WEDNESDAY

 

Personal Essay or Auto Biography:

Listen to several essays from This I Believe for ideas to write your own essay.  Students select essay topic to listen to for an example.

Tell a story: Be specific. Take your belief out of the ether and ground it in the events of your life. Consider moments when belief was formed or tested or changed. Think of your own experience, work, and family, and tell of the things you know that no one else does. Your story need not be heart-warming or gut-wrenching—it can even be funny—but it should be real. Make sure your story ties to the essence of your daily life philosophy and the shaping of your beliefs.

Be brief: Your statement should be between 350 and 500 words. That’s about three minutes when read aloud at your natural pace.

Name your belief: If you can’t name it in a sentence or two, your essay might not be about belief. Also, rather than writing a list, consider focusing on one core belief, because three minutes is a very short time.

Be positive: Please avoid preaching or editorializing. Tell us what you do believe, not what you don’t believe. Avoid speaking in the editorial “we.” Make your essay about you; speak in the first person.

Be personal: Write in words and phrases that are comfortable for you to speak. We recommend you read your essay aloud to yourself several times, and each time edit it and simplify it until you find the words, tone, and story that truly echo your belief and the way you speak.

Continue work on your  College Transition First Quarter Project  due FRIDAY NOV 1st:.

3

THURSDAY

 

Today you will begin to explore the following essential questions about identity through a character study:

What does it mean to grow up?  What does it mean to be an insider or an outsider? What can we learn from different generations? Why do we need beliefs and values? Why is it important for people to be able to communicate effectively? How does the study of fiction and non-fiction texts help individuals construct their understanding of reality?

Daily Journal--  So far, you have been the non fiction part of our character study, in what ways might literature help us see a larger perspective?


Go to library and pick up novel Frankenstein by Mary Shelly.

Begin Literature Circles toward reading The Crucible: Literature Circles Roles.

Explanations of Literature Circles process.

Your grade is based on preparation, contribution, as well quality of your assignments as evidenced in the quality and neatness in the completion of you packet, the ability to actually follow the written directions in the packet, observation in class.

Groups assign roles for the first act.

 Each member should be prepared to...  meet in literature circles and complete a Shared Notes sheet Here some groups in the past have prepared ahead -- making copies of their notes to share around their group-- way to go!

Tools: The Text, Lit Charts, Shmoop, Vocabulary.com


Go to Library and pick up

4

FRIDAY

 

Today you will continue  to explore the following essential questions about identity through a character study.

Daily Journal--  Who is the narrator of the letters?

Continue reading Letters 1-4.

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15

 

WEEK FIVE

 

7

MONDAY

 

Reading and meeting schedule for reading Frankenstein averaging 38 pages per week:

 

Week 5 Monday the 7th – meet to prepare for a group share meeting on Monday 15th reading through Chapters 1-6.

Your participation to the group's preparation, as observed by me in class, is is key to your grade today.  Counts as a Notebook Test Grade-- preparing your notes for the next meeting.

 

 

Week 6 Tuesday the 15--  Your first meeting as a group to discuss chapters 1-6 (p55) then decide new roles and begin reading Chapters 7-10. 

 

 

Week 6 Friday the 18th--  Your second meeting as a group to discuss chapters 7-10  (p 83) then decide new roles to begin reading 11-16.

 

 

Week 7 Thursday the 24th—Your third meeting as a group to discuss chapters 11-16 (p123) then decide new roles to begin reading for chapters 17-21.

 

Week 8  Tuesday the 29th-- Your fourth meeting  as a group to discuss chapters 17- 21 ( p. 162) then decide new roles to begin reading for chapters 22-23.

 

Week 9 Tuesday the 5th 22-23 (p. 198) -- Your fifth and final meeting as a group to discuss chapters 22-23.  The Literature Circles Packet is due completed according to directions provided in the packet.

8

TUESDAY

 Computer Lab  1211

College Transition First Quarter Project

9

WEDNESDAY

Presentation by staff of Briarcliffe College,

 

10

   THURSDAY

 Computer Lab 1211

College Transition First Quarter Project

11

FRIDAY

 Computer Lab 1211

College Transition First Quarter Project

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16

WEEK SIX

 

14

MONDAY

 OFF

15

TUESDAY

 LITERATURE CIRCLES MEETING DAY

 

Meet in literature circles and complete a Shared Notes sheet Here some groups are preparing ahead and making copies of their notes to share around-- way to go!

If you are not prepared your participation grade will suffer as your participation in the group is time sensitive and related to everyone's need for your contribution!

Week 6 Tuesday the 15--  Your first meeting as a group to discuss chapters 1-6 (p55) then decide new roles and begin reading Chapters 7-10. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 6 Friday the 18th--  Your second meeting as a group to discuss chapters 7-10  (p 83) then decide new roles to begin reading 11-16.

 

 

Week 7 Thursday the 24th—Your third meeting as a group to discuss chapters 11-16 (p123) then decide new roles to begin reading for chapters 17-21.

 

Week 8  Tuesday the 29th-- Your fourth meeting  as a group to discuss chapters 17- 21 ( p. 162) then decide new roles to begin reading for chapters 22-23.

 

Week 9 Tuesday the 5th 22-23 (p. 198) -- Your fifth and final meeting as a group to discuss chapters 22-23.  The Literature Circles Packet is due completed according to directions provided in the packet.

16

WEDNESDAY

 Testing Day 1/2 day

Reading and preparation for meeting day!

17

THURSDAY

 Reading and preparation for meeting day!

Do not STARE at this image!

 Fill in the the gaps of your packet for meeting tomorrow--   USE EBC or there really is nothing there for credit!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

18

FRIDAY

 LITERATURE CIRCLES MEETING DAY

First Roles and Share Sheet need to be completed by the end of class.

HW:Week 7 Monday the 21st--  Your second meeting as a group to discuss chapters 7-10  (p 83) then decide new roles to begin reading 11-16.

 

 

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17

WEEK SEVEN

 

21

MONDAY

 TODAY Week 7 Monday the 21st--  This is your second meeting as a group to discuss chapters 7-10  (p 83) then decide new roles to begin reading 11-16.

HW:  Week 7 Thursday the 24th—Your third meeting as a group to discuss chapters 11-16 (p123) then decide new roles to begin reading for chapters 17-21.

 

Week 8  Tuesday the 29th-- Your fourth meeting  as a group to discuss chapters 17- 21 ( p. 162) then decide new roles to begin reading for chapters 22-23.

 

Week 9 Tuesday the 5th 22-23 (p. 198) -- Your fifth and final meeting as a group to discuss chapters 22-23.  The Literature Circles Packet is due completed according to directions provided in the packet.

22

TUESDAY

 Complete and Sharing Sheet  Turn it in.  Use the class time for the next role and reading Chapters 11-16.

23

WEDNESDAY

 View clip from Mary Shelley's Frankenstein.  Update for meeting Thursday.

24

THURSDAY

 

TODAY Week 7 Thursday the 24th—Your third meeting as a group to discuss chapters 11-16 (p123) then decide new roles to begin reading for chapters 17-21.

 

HW Week 8  Tuesday the 29th-- Your fourth meeting  as a group to discuss chapters 17- 21 ( p. 162) then decide new roles to begin reading for chapters 22-23.

 

Week 9 Tuesday the 5th 22-23 (p. 198) -- Your fifth and final meeting as a group to discuss chapters 22-23.  The Literature Circles Packet is due completed according to directions provided in the packet.

25

FRIDAY

Olympic Night! 

College Transition First Quarter Project due next Friday.  Two additional days next week in computer lab.

TODAY

View clip from Mary Shelley's Frankenstein  

HW Week 8  Tuesday the 29th-- Your fourth meeting  as a group to discuss chapters 17- 21 ( p. 162) then decide new roles to begin reading for chapters 22-23.

 

Week 9 Tuesday the 5th 22-23 (p. 198) -- Your fifth and final meeting as a group to discuss chapters 22-23.  The Literature Circles Packet is due completed according to directions provided in the packet.

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18

 

WEEK EIGHT

 

28

MONDAY

 View clip from Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and prepare for meeting tomorrow chapters 17 - 21.

29

TUESDAY

 LITERATURE CIRCLES MEETING DAY

TODAY Week 8  Tuesday the 29th-- Your fourth meeting  as a group to discuss chapters 17- 21 ( p. 162) then decide new roles to begin reading for chapters 22-23.

HW Week 9 Tuesday the 5th 22-23 (p. 198) -- Your fifth and final meeting as a group to discuss chapters 22-23.  The Literature Circles Packet is due completed according to directions provided in the packet.

30

WEDNESDAY

  Computer Lab Meet in 1211

College Transition First Quarter Project due date extended to Monday. 

31

THURSDAY

  Computer Lab Meet in 1211

College Transition First Quarter Project due date extended to Monday. 

November 1

FRIDAY

 View clip from Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and prepare for meeting tomorrow chapters 22- 23.

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19

 

WEEK NINE

4

MONDAY

 Computer Lab Meet in 1211

Project is due. 

 

Research Colleges.

 

Consider what book -- at grade level, you will select for next quarter's Accountable Independent Reading project.  Is there a text you will have to read as a freshman???

5

TUESDAY

 LITERATURE CIRCLES MEETING DAY

TODAYWeek 9 Tuesday the 5th 22-23 (p. 198) -- Your fifth and final meeting as a group to discuss chapters 22-23.  The Literature Circles Packet is due completed according to directions provided in the packet.

You do not have to complete a share sheet as you know what to share at this point-- your grade for discussion will be based on direct observation.

Please turn in the packet today with four completed roles for a notebook test grade by Wednesday.

The 5 completed roles count  in your packet count as a notebook test grade.

6

WEDNESDAY

 

Literature Circle Packet is due.

Recall the following essential questions about identity through a character study and select one of them for a single paragraph response using our reading for a test grade:

 

What does it mean to grow up?  (consider the creature and his relationship with his creator e.g. Parent/Child  or God/Mankind)

What does it mean to be an insider or an outsider? (consider the creature and the effect that society has on him)

What can we learn from different generations?  (Consider that Mary Shelly was in her teens when she wrote this...  what does it tell us about today's world?

Why do we need beliefs and values?  (What beliefs and values were overlooked/warped, or essential to the novel?)

Why is it important for people to be able to communicate effectively? (Consider the complexity of the text and what might work for today's audience-- or what worked particularly well)

How does the study of fiction and non-fiction texts help individuals construct their understanding of reality?  (How does this text help us understand the world of science and technology we live in?)

 

You may use the alternative media presented in class as part of your evidence based claims in your paragraph.

 

 

7

THURSDAY

 

Work on take home test.

8

FRIDAY

 

 

Work on Summative Test on essential questions from Wednesday due today.

You may use the alternative media presented in class as part of your evidence based claims in your paragraph.

 

 All work is due.

 

 End of First Marking Period

THE GRADE BOOK IS CLOSED  GRADES ARE BEING RECONCILED THROUGH THE NEXT WEEK  GRADES ARE SUBJECT TO FINAL ASSIGNMENTS!

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 21

SECOND QUARTER:

 

WEEK ONE

 

11  closed

MONDAY

 OFF!

12

TUESDAY

INTRODUCTION TO THE Accountable Independent Reading (AIR) SECOND QUARTER PROJECT

What are your Personal Learning Goals?  What do you need practice in?  What will prepare you for college or a career.

Begin by determining the following based on the five weeks you have to complete the reading and the final project.

#1 How long you have to read the text and how long it will take you to read the text (take the number of pages you read in 10minutes and determine how many minutes it will take to read based on the number of pages).  DETERMINE WHEN YOU SELECT AND HAVE APPROVAL FOR THE TEXT.

#2 What skill would you like to focus on-- on grade level  here ?  All work proposed MUST have Evidence Based Claims as part of the final project as well as a rubric on the scale of 1-20.

#3 CONSIDER-- What steps will you need to take to complete the published product for your project?  Will you have to take notes as you read?  Will you need to keep a journal with page # citation?  How long to create that video?   How many drafts (from brainstorming to final draft) will you write and include in your final project?  Will you finally learn how to cite and complete an awesome Works Cited page????  What steps in the writing process will you focus on???

#4 What will you need to accomplish in order to complete the required writing and book talk?  YOU MUST BRING THE TEXT EVERY DAY!  SHOW ME!


Student Brainstorm Project Ideas to share with the class and we discuss how to ensure EBC are incorporated:


As you are working on this independent project, keep in mind we will be covering other material in class!

Done?  Type up your proposal for Accountable Independent Reading  (Self-select text to respond and develop innovative perspectives. Establish and use criteria to classify, select, and evaluate texts to make informed judgments about the quality of the pieces). 

 

 

13

WEDNESDAY

 

Reading--CYRANO DE BERGERAC

 

1) What is Beauty?  Does it imply handsome?

In groups, define beauty to share with the class.  Is it limited to women only?  To Art?  To Music? Cars?  Is the definition of handsome exclusive of men?  Art? Music? Cars?

2) You come up with the answer as a group and write it on the board.  Be able to explain your answer.

How is "beauty" portrayed today? Here?  What is the role of media?

How is "handsome" portrayed today? Here? 

3)  As a group, answer the following: what is the role of media in telling us what is beautiful?  Write it on the board.

Is there any other kind of beauty?

WHEN READING THE PLAY BE SURE TO take parts for participation credit above a "D."

As we read together, be prepared to complete the assigned work for credit as distributed in class.  Begin pre-reading for Act I.

 

14

THURSDAY

 

CYRANO DE BERGERAC

Take parts for participation credit above a "D."

As we read together, be prepared to complete the assigned work for credit as distributed in class.  Begin pre-reading for Act I.

  

15

FRIDAY

  Meet in LIBRARY

Get approval for book, begin reading and work on project proposal:

SECOND QUARTER PROJECT HERE

What are your Personal Learning Goals?  What do you need practice in?  What will prepare you for college or a career.

Begin by determining the following based on the five weeks you have to complete the reading and the final project.

#1 How long you have to read the text and how long it will take you to read the text (take the number of pages you read in 10minutes and determine how many minutes it will take to read based on the number of pages).  DETERMINE WHEN YOU SELECT AND HAVE APPROVAL FOR THE TEXT.

#2 What skill would you like to focus on-- on grade level  here ?  All work proposed MUST have Evidence Based Claims as part of the final project as well as a rubric on the scale of 1-20.

#3 CONSIDER-- What steps will you need to take to complete the published product for your project?  Will you have to take notes as you read?  Will you need to keep a journal with page # citation?  How long to create that video?   How many drafts (from brainstorming to final draft) will you write and include in your final project?  Will you finally learn how to cite and complete an awesome Works Cited page????  What steps in the writing process will you focus on???

#4 What will you need to accomplish in order to complete the required writing and book talk?  YOU MUST BRING THE TEXT EVERY DAY!  SHOW ME!


Student Brainstorm Project Ideas to share with the class and we discuss how to ensure EBC are incorporated:

As you are working on this independent project, keep in mind we will be covering other material in class!

Done?  Type up your proposal for Accountable Independent Reading  (Self-select text to respond and develop innovative perspectives. Establish and use criteria to classify, select, and evaluate texts to make informed judgments about the quality of the pieces). 

Student Suggested Project Ideas incorporating Evidence Based Claims AND A RUBRIC (HOW YOU WILL SET A PERSONAL GOAL FOR QUALITY) ON A SCALE OF 1 - 20!

OTHER Project Ideas STUDENTS generated WITH EBC: Here

Reading and work on   Project Proposal 10%

YOU MUST INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING AT THE BOTTOM OF YOUR PROPOSAL:

 

As not all books are taken out of the High School Library.  I, the parent / guardian of (student) ________________________________, approve the student selected book (title)_________________________________ for use on this Independent Reading Project due Thursday May 24th: additionally, that the subject of, and research for, any self designed project must be appropriate for classroom display.

I AGREE Signed _____________________________________     I AGREE  Student______________________________

 

 

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22

WEEK TWO

 

18 Monday

Meet in LIBRARY

Get approval for book, begin reading and work on project proposal due for approval on Friday:

SECOND QUARTER PROJECT HERE

What are your Personal Learning Goals?  What do you need practice in?  What will prepare you for college or a career.

Begin by determining the following based on the five weeks you have to complete the reading and the final project.

#1 How long you have to read the text and how long it will take you to read the text (take the number of pages you read in 10minutes and determine how many minutes it will take to read based on the number of pages).  DETERMINE WHEN YOU SELECT AND HAVE APPROVAL FOR THE TEXT.

#2 What skill would you like to focus on-- on grade level  here ?  All work proposed MUST have Evidence Based Claims as part of the final project as well as a rubric on the scale of 1-20.

#3 CONSIDER-- What steps will you need to take to complete the published product for your project?  Will you have to take notes as you read?  Will you need to keep a journal with page # citation?  How long to create that video?   How many drafts (from brainstorming to final draft) will you write and include in your final project?  Will you finally learn how to cite and complete an awesome Works Cited page????  What steps in the writing process will you focus on???

#4 What will you need to accomplish in order to complete the required writing and book talk?  YOU MUST BRING THE TEXT EVERY DAY!  SHOW ME!


Student Brainstorm Project Ideas to share with the class and we discuss how to ensure EBC are incorporated:

As you are working on this independent project, keep in mind we will be covering other material in class!

Done?  Type up your proposal for Accountable Independent Reading  (Self-select text to respond and develop innovative perspectives. Establish and use criteria to classify, select, and evaluate texts to make informed judgments about the quality of the pieces). 

Student Suggested Project Ideas incorporating Evidence Based Claims AND A RUBRIC (HOW YOU WILL SET A PERSONAL GOAL FOR QUALITY) ON A SCALE OF 1 - 20!

OTHER Project Ideas STUDENTS generated WITH EBC: Here

Reading and work on   Project Proposal 10%

YOU MUST INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING AT THE BOTTOM OF YOUR PROPOSAL:

 

As not all books are taken out of the High School Library.  I, the parent / guardian of (student) ________________________________, approve the student selected book (title)_________________________________ for use on this Independent Reading Project due Thursday May 24th: additionally, that the subject of, and research for, any self designed project must be appropriate for classroom display.

I AGREE Signed _____________________________________     I AGREE  Student______________________________

 

 

 

19

TUESDAY

 

CYRANO DE BERGERAC

Take parts for participation credit above a "D."

As we read together, be prepared to complete the assigned work for credit as distributed in class.  Begin pre-reading for Act I.

20

WEDNESDAY

 

CYRANO DE BERGERAC

Take parts for participation credit above a "D."

As we read together, be prepared to complete the assigned work for credit as distributed in class.  Begin pre-reading for Act I.

21

THURSDAY

 

CYRANO DE BERGERAC

Take parts for participation credit above a "D."

As we read together, be prepared to complete the assigned work for credit as distributed in class.  Begin pre-reading for Act I.

22

FRIDAY

 Reading / Project Day--  Proposal (must be approved) and parent guardian approval is due.

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23

WEEK THREE

 

25

MONDAY

 

View Act I in adaptation of Cyrano de Bergerac.

HW:  reading day Tuesday... Bring Text! 

HW-- PROPOSAL IS DUE FOR TEN PERCENT OF PROJECT GRADE!

26

TUESDAY

 Reading Day!  Reading and work on Project Proposal 10%

HAPPY HANUKKAH AND HAPPY THANKSGIVING!

HW- PROPOSAL IS DUE FOR TEN PERCENT OF PROJECT GRADE is  due Monday we return:

Student Suggested Project Ideas incorporating Evidence Based Claims AND A RUBRIC (HOW YOU WILL SET A PERSONAL GOAL FOR QUALITY) ON A SCALE OF 1 - 20!

STUDENT generated Project Ideas WITH EBC: Here

Reading and work on   Project Proposal 10%

YOU MUST INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING AT THE BOTTOM OF YOUR PROPOSAL:

 

As not all books are taken out of the High School Library.  I, the parent / guardian of (student) ________________________________, approve the student selected book (title)_________________________________ for use on this Independent Reading Project due Thursday May 24th: additionally, that the subject of, and research for, any self designed project must be appropriate for classroom display.

I AGREE Signed _____________________________________     I AGREE  Student______________________________

 

 

27

WEDNESDAY

 Thanksgiving

28

THURSDAY

 Thanksgiving

29

FRIDAY

 Thanksgiving

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24

WEEK FOUR

 

2

MONDAY

 

PROPOSALS ARE DUE TODAY AS PART OF YOUR AIR  PROJECT GRADE 

 No project will be accepted that has not been approved!

CYRANO DE BERGERAC

Take parts for participation credit above a "D."

As we read together, be prepared to complete the assigned work for credit as distributed in class.

3

TUESDAY

CYRANO DE BERGERAC

Take parts for participation credit above a "D."

As we read together, be prepared to complete the assigned work for credit as distributed in class.

4

WEDNESDAY

 

Complete reading Act 5 on your own.  Compare the ending of the play with the ending of the film “Roxanne” in a paragraph of at least 8 lines with evidence from both the play and the film.

 

OR

 

Complete the “Active Reading” worksheets and “Responding” pages 29-31—

You must use complete sentences.

 

5

THURSDAY

 

“Unrequited love” - “Unrequited love is love that is not reciprocated, even though reciprocation is usually deeply desired.”

The Unrequited Love - Letter Assignment

 

Cyrano-- why a love letter?

How does perspective shape or alter truth?  How do media shape our view of the world and ourselves? In what ways do media construct reality?  Consider the medium e-mail, snail mail, post it, fruit basket with a note, tweet, Facebook status…etc.

Complete all three parts for credit.

Part 1) Write a romantic text to your “love”-- or, you may do a comment on their web page… a tweet, a limerick etc.

Part 2) It's easy to get confused when trying to express how you feel to someone you love. Just being in the same room with the object of your affections can make you feel a little muddled—plan on re-reading the letter.  You may reach clarity of thought by the time you finish the letter that you didn't have when you started and which you probably wouldn't have reached trying to express yourself in person.  Essentially, you are writing to learn.  Select any person or celebrity, and write them an anonymous love letter does not name yourself or the person you are writing to!  First, it builds suspense. Secondly, you can deny everything.

People Enjoy Personal Letters: Even with today's dependence on the Internet and email, an unending flow of paper mail still arrives every day. It's nice to sort through a pile of paper to find a hand-written envelope with a personal letter inside. Such a letter is the product of someone else's need to communicate with you. A love letter provokes an emotional response in the reader, who will probably keep it and cherish it. Email messages and texts, on the other hand, are easily deleted and do not offer the same type of emotional involvement or physical permanence. Additionally, email isn't expected to be grammatically correct or especially well thought out. It's written in a hurry—easy come, easy go.

Expressing Your Feelings: When you start to write a love letter, it's best not to overdo the expressions of love, especially in the beginning of a relationship, as you may appear insincere or even comical. Subtleness is the key because it allows the loved one to try to read between the lines while letting you test the waters. You can then judge by the response if you can move forward in the relationship or not, without putting yourself in an awkward or embarrassing position. If your feelings become very intense, however, it may be wise to let your letter stand for 24 hours and then read it again. You may be surprised that you decide to soften the tone a little and rewrite a sentence or two before you mail it. Only when you feel confident the letter expresses how you feel and exactly what you want to say (and what is wise to say), should you lick the envelope and add the postage stamp. Remember, all love letters are written in indelible ink!

Don't Forget the Details:  Attention to physical details is important in a love letter. Not long ago, I bought a sheet of reptile stamps at the post office. The turtle and the lizard looked cute on out-going mail, but for some reason I always resisted using the large stamps with the coiled, red snake. What kind of an impression, unconscious or otherwise, would any negative imagery create on a love letter? It would be best not to find out. The next sheet of stamps I bought showed bouquets of pink flowers that would create a positive or at least neutral impression in any situation. Not only is what you write important, but so is the paper, the envelope, the ink, the font, and all noticeable details that will carry your message to the one you love. The sum of the details creates the overall impression that your letter will make on the reader.

Should I Use a Pen or the Computer?  Writing a letter by hand is, of course, very personal, and if you are sending a short note, getting out your favorite pen is still probably the best choice. With a short note, too, you can also use attractive stationery with matching envelopes. But if you need to work out your thoughts and feelings, making corrections in the process, a letter created on your computer may be the most practical choice; however, in the end, use standard black ink as you then handwrite it.

How Long Should My Love Letter Be?  An initial contact suggests a short, flirty letter (a few paragraphs).  While to a partner in an established relationship will take every word to be cherished.  In a new relationship, however, it may seem odd or even presumptive to write extensively to someone you really don't know.

What if I Need Help Getting Started? Writing a love letter can be a rewarding experience for the writer as well as for the reader. In the process, the writer learns to better express his/her deepest feelings and both parties reach a level of mutual understanding they did not have before. Love by its nature is sensitive and vulnerable, however, so certain conventions need to be followed and certain language needs to be used to enable you to fan the flames of love rather than to blow them out.

Part 3) What is the difference between part one and two?  Explain in a paragraph which you would prefer to receive and why.

 

6

FRIDAY

  Reading / Project Day--  Proposal (must be approved) and parent guardian approval was due by Monday.  No project will be accepted that has not been approved!

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25

WEEK FIVE    **Interim Reports**

 

9

MONDAY

 

Complete your -- "The Unrequited Love - Letter Assignment"  and turn it in.

Schools kill creativity?  HMM?  What would the ideal school look like??  Work together in groups to come up with an answer to share with the class.

10

TUESDAY

 

Utopia and controversial issues taking positions.

Definitions -- Utopia and Dystopia.

Our Essential Questions:

1) What is a Utopia?

2) What is your role in creating a Utopia?

3) How would you know if you were living in a Utopia? 

 

11

WEDNESDAY

 

UTOPIA-- and still more utopia.

12

THURSDAY

 

Decide who in the class you would like to work with in order to construct your own Utopia as part of this unit.

The only limit is that there may be no groups more than six or fewer than three.

Consider grades, contributions, how you will share the work, what the quality of your work will bring you as you answer the following questions together (fun counts of course -- but does it get the cows milked... or the work done?)--

1) What is a Utopia?

2) What is your role in creating a Utopia?

3) How would you know if you were living in a Utopia? 

4) Lastly, identify the effects that the "head bands" or "intrusions" have on the people in Harrison Bergeron by Kurt Vonnegut.  When you have done this, reflect upon the possiblity that the "head bands" or "intrusions" are similar to any technology today that we choose to incorporate into our lives?  What technology (possibly that you carry with you) has similar effects on people?

5) How does Harrison Bergeron by Kurt Vonnegut end?

As a group, have one neat copy with all of the names of the people who will be in your group for the next assignments as all of the people who have contributed.

 

 

HW  be prepared to work on your AIR project tomorrow.

13

FRIDAY

 Harrison Bergeron by Kurt Vonnegut  -- Utopia???  Discuss

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26

 WEEK SIX

 

16

MONDAY

 Harrison Bergeron  and Utopia-- Create a Utopia Project

 

Design Your Own Utopia (A Framework for Debate)

 

 All aspects of your Utopia should be consistent (i.e. freedom for all yet believe in slavery) or revised.  If you say a goal is freedom and then later you restrict freedom you must amend your goal or clarify the criteria.  If you have a category that you believe should be included let's add it!  As we continue in the course we will use these positions as a framework for classroom debate.

 

 Using complete sentences and paragraphs where appropriate for full credit, we will begin designing our utopias using the following categories:

I.    Scope    II.    Goals & Values   III.    Members/Citizens  IV.   Children & Education  V.      Power & Politics  VI.     Economics, Work, and Leisure  VII.    Gender Roles and Differences  VIII.   Science & Technology  IX.   Religion  X.   The Arts  XI.  The Physical  XII.   Food  XIII.  Animals  XIV.    Military/War   XV.     Communications

Today  You will begin by creating a framework for decision making-- A RULES OF ORDER.  How will the group decide?  Will one person have veto power or a tie breaking vote???  How will votes continue if someone in the group is absent?  Who might hold their vote as a proxy?

The SCOPE AND RULES OF ORDER DUE BY FRIDAY at the latest.

Once you are done... Write the names of the people in your group on the top a a piece of paper and answer the following:

I. Scope
 
     1. Would your utopia be a global utopia and why?  (Should there be a one world government to eliminate war?)   How will this be achieved with multiple governments that might not agree?
 
         A. If not, would it be a nation state? A bioregion? A city? An eco-village or other type of intentional community? If none of the above, what?
 

 

B. What would the flag look like? What is the name?
 
 
 
 
C. What would be the most important document? (would you be able to change it?)
 
 
 
 
D. What would the flag look like? 
 

 

Have everyone in your group sign their agreement at the bottom of this document-- be prepared to present your Utopia to the class.  This is a chance for you to convince the other groups to fall under your own utopia where they would have to go along with your decisions-- you must the authorized leaders to join unanimously for a one world government!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

17

TUESDAY

12  class days remain.   Delay Schedule: HERE

 

FROZEN

Due to the weather and schedule we will delay the presentations through Wednesday -- if schedule is amended again-- Thursday.

II.    Goals & Values   III.    Members/Citizens 

 

Design Your Own Utopia (A Framework for Debate)

SCOPE AND RULES OF ORDER DUE BY FRIDAY

18

WEDNESDAY

 Design Your Own Utopia (A Framework for Debate)

II.    Goals & Values   III.    Members/Citizens 

SCOPE AND RULES OF ORDER DUE BY FRIDAY

19

THURSDAY

 Design Your Own Utopia (A Framework for Debate)

SCOPE AND RULES OF ORDER DUE BY FRIDAY

20

FRIDAY

 Design Your Own Utopia (A Framework for Debate) / AIR Reading Day

ENJOY!!!!!!!!

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27

 

WEEK SEVEN

 

6

MONDAY

 SECOND QUARTER PROJECT HERE   DUE WEDNESDAY the 22nd

What are your Personal Learning Goals?  What do you need practice in?  What will prepare you for college or a career.

Begin by determining the following based on the five weeks you have to complete the reading and the final project.

#1 How long you have to read the text and how long it will take you to read the text (take the number of pages you read in 10minutes and determine how many minutes it will take to read based on the number of pages).  DETERMINE WHEN YOU SELECT AND HAVE APPROVAL FOR THE TEXT.

#2 What skill would you like to focus on-- on grade level  here ?  All work proposed MUST have Evidence Based Claims as part of the final project as well as a rubric on the scale of 1-20.

#3 CONSIDER-- What steps will you need to take to complete the published product for your project?  Will you have to take notes as you read?  Will you need to keep a journal with page # citation?  How long to create that video?   How many drafts (from brainstorming to final draft) will you write and include in your final project?  Will you finally learn how to cite and complete an awesome Works Cited page????  What steps in the writing process will you focus on???

#4 What will you need to accomplish in order to complete the required writing and book talk?  YOU MUST BRING THE TEXT EVERY DAY!  SHOW ME!


Student Brainstorm Project Ideas to share with the class and we discuss how to ensure EBC are incorporated:

As you are working on this independent project, keep in mind we will be covering other material in class!

Done?  Type up your proposal for Accountable Independent Reading  (Self-select text to respond and develop innovative perspectives. Establish and use criteria to classify, select, and evaluate texts to make informed judgments about the quality of the pieces). 

Student Suggested Project Ideas incorporating Evidence Based Claims AND A RUBRIC (HOW YOU WILL SET A PERSONAL GOAL FOR QUALITY) ON A SCALE OF 1 - 20!

OTHER Project Ideas STUDENTS generated WITH EBC: Here

 

 

Be prepared to present your work on the scope of your Utopia to the class on Tuesday.

Design Your Own Utopia (A Framework for Debate)

 

 All aspects of your Utopia should be consistent (i.e. freedom for all yet believe in slavery) or revised.  If you say a goal is freedom and then later you restrict freedom you must amend your goal or clarify the criteria.  If you have a category that you believe should be included let's add it!  As we continue in the course we will use these positions as a framework for classroom debate.

 

 Using complete sentences and paragraphs where appropriate for full credit, we will begin designing our utopias using the following categories:

I.    Scope    II.    Goals & Values   III.    Members/Citizens  IV.   Children & Education  V.      Power & Politics  VI.     Economics, Work, and Leisure  VII.    Gender Roles and Differences  VIII.   Science & Technology  IX.   Religion  X.   The Arts  XI.  The Physical  XII.   Food  XIII.  Animals  XIV.    Military/War   XV.     Communications

Today  You will begin by creating a framework for decision making-- A RULES OF ORDER.  How will the group decide?  Will one person have veto power or a tie breaking vote???  How will votes continue if someone in the group is absent?  Who might hold their vote as a proxy?

The SCOPE AND RULES OF ORDER DUE BY FRIDAY at the latest.

Once you are done... Write the names of the people in your group on the top a a piece of paper and answer the following:

I. Scope
 
     1. Would your utopia be a global utopia and why?  (Should there be a one world government to eliminate war?)   How will this be achieved with multiple governments that might not agree?
 
         A. If not, would it be a nation state? A bioregion? A city? An eco-village or other type of intentional community? If none of the above, what?
 

 

B. What would the flag look like? What is the name?
 
 
 
 
C. What would be the most important document? (would you be able to change it?)
 
 
 
 
D. What would the flag look like? 
 

 

Have everyone in your group sign their agreement at the bottom of this document-- be prepared to present your Utopia to the class.  This is a chance for you to convince the other groups to fall under your own utopia where they would have to go along with your decisions-- you must the authorized leaders to join unanimously for a one world government!

 

 

7

TUESDAY

 

2  class days remain.   Delay Schedule: HERE

 

FROZEN

Due to the weather and schedule we will delay the presentations through Wednesday -- if schedule is amended again-- Thursday.

II.    Goals & Values   III.    Members/Citizens 

8

WEDNESDAY

 In groups, work on the next portion of your Utopia  II.    Goals & Values   III.    Members/Citizens PRESENT all ON MONDAY THE 13TH

9

THURSDAY

  Work on the next portion of your Utopia  II.    Goals & Values 

10

FRIDAY

  SECOND QUARTER PROJECT HERE   DUE WEDNESDAY the 22nd  Done reading???  For extra credit select another text and have it in class each Friday through Jan 31st.

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28

WEEK EIGHT

 

13

MONDAY

 Presentations of Utopian  II.    Goals & Values   III.    Members/Citizens 

14

TUESDAY

 Continue work on Utopia as assigned  IV.   Children & Education  V.      Power & Politics 

15

WEDNESDAY

 Continue work on Utopia as assigned  IV.   Children & Education  V.      Power & Politics 

16

THURSDAY

 Continue work on Utopia as assigned   IV.   Children & Education  V.      Power & Politics 

17

FRIDAY

 

DYSTOPIA?  What are the charateristics?

As we explore the relationship of the individual to society, we are face with two powerful essential questions-- 

1) What are civil (human) rights and is it important to defend them?  

2) What do we defend them from?  Is it only people or are there other things too?

 

 

 

In order to begin our study of DYSTOPIA we will consider excerpts of Fahrenheit 451 as part of the dystopian genre.

Read the following quote from Ray Bradbury and give your best answer to the question below the quotation:

What is the warning that Bradbury suggests is greater than censorship?

 

Respond in paragraph format.

 

 

 

 

PEW

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SECOND QUARTER PROJECT HERE   ALL PARTS ARE DUE NEXT WEDNESDAY the 22nd  Done reading???  For extra credit select another text and have it in class each Friday through Jan 31st.

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29

WEEK NINE

 

Off 20

MONDAY

 

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s Birthday -- Schools & Offices Closed

21

TUESDAY

 -

UTOPIA AND WAR!!!!!!!!

In our scenario, spending over 50% on military during time of peace will increase the likelihood (5 in 6) that there will be a revolution that divides your military in half before a time of war.   Spending over 40% on military during time of peace will increase the likelihood (3 in 6) that there will be a revolution that divides your military in half before a time of war. 

MIDTERM is Thursday.  It is a one period skills based essay format exam.  Be on time and prepared to write.

Make-up exam/conflict day will be on Thursday, January 30th

22

WEDNESDAY

 ????????????????????

 

23

THURSDAY

 

MIDTERM

Make-up exam/conflict day will be on Thursday, January 30th

24

FRIDAY

 MIDTERM

Make-up exam/conflict day will be on Thursday, January 30th

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210

 

WEEK TEN  Regents Week

 

27

MONDAY

 

28

TUESDAY

 

29

WEDNESDAY

 

30

THURSDAY

 make-up exam/conflict day will be on Thursday, January 30th

31

FRIDAY

End of Second Marking Period

Welcome Mr. M!

How was the Regents Exam?

 

 

Due today-- 

On a separate sheet of paper, write a poem to be included in a Valentine's Day Card inside using five LITERARY DEVICES where you identify the literary devices.

Create a Valentine's Day Card with the poem inside.

Turn in both at the end of the period for credit-- place the poem inside the card when you turn it in (so you don't have to write your name on the card).

 

Happy Groundhog day... again!

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 31

 

THIRD QUARTER:

WEEK ONE

 

February 3

MONDAY

 SNOW DAY


4

TUESDAY

 DELAYED OPENING

Much Ado About Nothing by Shakespeare (distributed in class).

An introduction--

What's Your Opinion?

Copy the statements into your notebook and indicate if they are true or false:

1. Men and women should marry persons of a similar social and economic status as themselves.

2. People choose with whom they will fall in love.

3. It is better not to marry than to marry and risk being cheated on by your spouse.

4. Most people can be trusted to be faithful in marriage.

5. Men are attracted to women who are assertive and bold and loud.

6. Jealousy in a romantic relationship is usually a sign the relationship has problems.

7. Because parents usually know what is best for their children when it comes to choosing a mate, children should go along with their parents' wishes in this regard.

Discuss your answers in small groups or with the whole class. Does everyone agree?

Reading together--
Much Ado About Nothing

 

 

5

WEDNESDAY

POSSIBLE DELAYED OPENING/ Snow Day?

SNOW DAY

Reading together--
Much Ado About Nothing

6

THURSDAY

 

 

View Excerpts--
Much Ado About Nothing

7

FRIDAY

 View Excerpts--

 

Reading together--
Much Ado About Nothing

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32

WEEK TWO

 

10

MONDAY

 

“You love me. Real or not real?"
I tell him, "Real.”
Suzanne Collins, (Katniss) Mockingjay

How have the recurrent motifs of history and of art influenced society?  

A motif is typically a particular image, symbol, phrase, or action that recurs throughout a written work in a way that holds together the entire work and provides greater meaning. This idea is rather closely aligned with themes present in a work and motifs often help support or establish those themes. Symbolism is also frequently used in the creation of motifs, especially those that may reference cultural ideas or concepts greater than the scope of the work itself. A motif can take just about any form and once recognized and understood by a reader often lends greater meaning to the work.

As we continue to read we will explore motifs of Marriage, Social Position (reputation) and Grace (obligation), Lies and Deception, Language and Education, Love and Hate, Honor/ Pride Maturity.

Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more, Men were deceivers ever,- One foot in sea and one on shore, To one thing constant never.”

Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more,                      (sigh     expression of  "disappointment / sadness)

Men were deceivers ever,-                                    (pronounce the words for double meaning and pun)         e.g. de ceivers    -----  French de  is ""of    of sea "in sea"

One foot in sea and one on shore,                         (traveling as in the navy  [how are sailors stereotyped?  -- a wife in every port]  /    "  on sure"  ... un sure... inconstant)  

To one thing constant never.”                               (is this true?  does it relate to the title???     is it truly nothing?)

 

 

 

Reading together--
Much Ado About Nothing

 

11

TUESDAY

 Reading together--
Much Ado About Nothing

Much Ado About Nothing is a relationship centered play where Shakespeare explores the transformation individuals must undergo in order to form intimate connections with each other.

In this play we focus on the question“What is essential to a successful relationship as revealed in Much Ado About Nothing?”

The old cliché "love is blind" illustrates the theme of appearance versus reality. In groups of three or four, brainstorm and list some popular sayings about love, lovers, and marriage, such as "love at first sight," "love is in the eye of the beholder," or "marry in haste, repent in leisure." 

Is there a basis for these sayings? What is it about love that causes people to be "blind," to be "a little mad," to "lose themselves in love"?

Now, together, brainstorm in small groups the titles of songs dealing with love and romance. What types of love are sung about (i.e. young love, married love, or physical desire, unfulfilled love, unfaithful love, jealous love)? What do these different kinds of love say about human nature today?   Was it the same in Shakespeare's time?  Have we changed that much?

Is there still a "double standard" for men and women?  To what extent does it still operate today? Why does it still operate? How does it account for different gender-specific behaviors?  Would you marry someone with a bad reputation?

 

 

Third Quarter Project Due Monday March 24th

Research for comparison wedding customs and related issues between Shakespeare's' world and ours in order to better understand the essential question:

“What is essential to a successful relationship as revealed in Much Ado About Nothing?”

 

Select one of the following options incorporating Evidence Based Claims (EBC) and Citation according to MLA format.:

1 Plan an Elizabethan / Shakespearian wedding to present to the class you may work in groups up to 4 (submit a works cited page of at least 7 sources- according to MLA format).

2 Compare and contrast one or more elements with the modern world and present it to the class you may work in pairs for this activity (submit a works cited page of at least 5 sources- according to MLA format).

3 Select an aspect that interests you and write a well researched essay with a works cited page of at least three sources- according to MLA format.

4 PROPOSE an alternatively rigorous idea for approval that requires research and a works cited page of at least three sources- according to MLA format) GET APPROVAL FROM ME FIRST.  

 

IDEAS??

Try GOOGLE  and things like 21st Century wedding trends http://www.elizabethan.org/compendium/62.html   

Who published this? http://www.william-shakespeare.info/elizabethan-wedding-customs.htm 

Who published this? http://comminfo.rutgers.edu/~sroczyns/wedding.html Who published this? 

What's the ~ ? http://www.renaissance-weddings.net/  Who published this?  What's up with the .net CITATION

MLA

Consider the source  HERE Citation Machine   and my new favorite EASYBIB  http://www.easybib.com/

 

Researched and organized project is worth 50%  Properly formatted works cited page according to the MLA is worth 50%      

Consider but do not limit yourself to the following:

Betrothal / Engagement / Promise / Parents Permission Wedding Customs - Arranged Marriages and Contracts / Wedding Customs /  The Age of Consent / Union of souls/ Religious Considerations /The Dowry / Gifts / Parents Wedding Contracts / Handfast marriages / Wedding Reception & Food / The Wedding Dresses / Clothing / Rings /  Reception / Entertainment / COST?/ The importance of marriage to an Elizabethan woman /....

12

WEDNESDAY

3rd Q Project (see Tuesday February 11th for instructions)

Third Quarter Project 3rd Q Project (see Tuesday February 11th for instructions)

Due Monday March 24th

3 and 4 in room 1211

13

THURSDAY

 EXCERPTS /  Reading together--
Much Ado About Nothing

Done? work on project ideas.

 

14

Midwinter Recess Begins

FRIDAY

Third Quarter Project  3rd Q Project (see Tuesday February 11th for instructions)

 

Due Monday March 24th

Periods 3, 4, 1211

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33

WEEK THREE

 

24

MONDAY

As we continue our exploration of the following essential question:    How do I effectively communicate to a variety of audiences for distinct purposes?

What does it mean to think critically?   What does it mean to listen critically?

 

 

We will study, create and deliver a motivational speech using Monroe's Motivational Sequence.

MONROE’S MOTIVATED SEQUENCE--THE FIVE STEPS
STEP
FUNCTION
IDEAL AUDIENCE RESPONSE
Attention to get audience to listen "I want to hear what you have to say"
Need to get audience to feel a need or want "I agree. I have that need/want
Satisfaction to tell audience how to fill need or want "I see your solution will work"
Visualization to get audience to see benefits of solution "This is a great idea"
Action to get audience to take action "I want it"

See HERE for additonal information.

Your grade is based on the following:

You must address all five steps effectively and in writing on notecards (see me) according to MONROE’S MOTIVATED SEQUENCE and turn in a second copy of your planned speech on paper before Monday March 10th. 5 HW assignments.

You must be prepared to speak and listen every day (until you have spoken)  The Week's Participation Grade.

TOPIC SELECTION:

No Duplicates.  Sign up and get approval. 

Today, review sequence and take notes.   Work together in pairs or small groups of three to plan your speech for each person to present their own motivational speech.

Recall--

THANK YOU Mr. Ross FOR THE MATERIALS!

                Create, organize, and utilize note cards for note card delivery of a speech

Apply basic note-taking skills to make it easier to locate needed information on the cards while minimizing the time spent looking down. (Note card guidelines: there should be more white space than ink on cards,  indent, utilize outline form, skip lines, use highlighters, use symbols, don’t write on back of cards, number cards,  write larger than usual.)

The number of note cards required is typically up to the speaker, but generally, the rule of thumb is:  too many cards results in too much looking down and not enough connecting with the audience, while too few note cards results in too much looking  to the back upper right wall or too much looking up into the brain to find what to say, with the same end result of poor eye contact and audience connection.

                                Perform appropriate pre-speaking routine (2nd) 

Stretch jaw by yawning- (To help encourage proper articulation)

Assume military posture, then relax a little- (To remind students to stand correctly at podium, and to help them avoid weight shifting, rocking, and podium leaning)

Breathe deeply- (to limit anxiety and to aid in appropriate voice projection and tone)

Deliver a speech using appropriate eye contact and vocal variety. 

(Students will also memorize and present a short tongue twister between the first and second speeches to further develop their vocal variety)

(1st speech focus- Avoiding rookie mistakes)   (2nd speech focus- Further refinement of vocal variety and eye contact)  (Tongue twister performance focus- Articulation improvement) 

                                                Content -Vocal variety: 

Rate:  (1st) Students will speak at an appropriate rate by avoiding common rookie mistake of rushing their words. (2nd) Students will vary rate for effect.

Pitch:  (1st) Students will demonstrate appropriate pitch changes by avoiding common rookie mistake of speaking in monotone. (2nd)  Students will vary pitch for effect.

Volume:  (1st) Students will project their voice appropriately by avoiding common rookie mistake of not speaking to the back row.  (2nd)  Students will vary volume for effect.

Articulation: (2nd)  Students will properly articulate their words by opening mouth appropriately for vowels and exploding the consonants and avoiding the common rookie mistake of mumbling.

                                                Content- Eye Contact

(1st)Students will establish appropriate eye contact by avoiding common rookie mistake of looking down more than looking up.

(2nd)  Students will use eye contact to develop a connection with their audience (look around room naturally, try to establish individual eye contact with as many audience members as possible,  try not to cut off the corners of the room, try not to stare at one person, try not to look over heads of audience members at back right wall, try not  to look up into their own heads for words they can’t recall, try not to get lost in note cards, try to look down at cards by lowering eyes and not head.)

Audience Role

The audience will be expected to maintain a response journal in which they evaluate/critique each speaker.   They will also provide immediate and invaluable feedback for speaker at the conclusion of each speech.  Both the journal and the positive contributions to whole class follow-up discussions will be evaluated by the teacher.

25

TUESDAY

 Work on speech or project.

26

WEDNESDAY

 Work on speech or project.

Meet in computer lab.

27

THURSDAY

 Thursday, Feb 27, 2014  Comp Lab 1211

Third Quarter Project Due Monday March 24th

Research for comparison wedding customs and related issues between Shakespeare's' world and ours in order to better understand the essential question:

“What is essential to a successful relationship as revealed in Much Ado About Nothing?”

 

Select one of the following options incorporating Evidence Based Claims (EBC) and Citation according to MLA format.:

1 Plan an Elizabethan / Shakespearian wedding to present to the class you may work in groups up to 4 (submit a works cited page of at least 7 sources- according to MLA format).

2 Compare and contrast one or more elements with the modern world and present it to the class you may work in pairs for this activity (submit a works cited page of at least 5 sources- according to MLA format).

3 Select an aspect that interests you and write a well researched essay with a works cited page of at least three sources- according to MLA format.

4 PROPOSE an alternatively rigorous idea for approval that requires research and a works cited page of at least three sources- according to MLA format) GET APPROVAL FROM ME FIRST.  

 

IDEAS??

Try GOOGLE  and things like 21st Century wedding trends http://www.elizabethan.org/compendium/62.html   

Who published this? http://www.william-shakespeare.info/elizabethan-wedding-customs.htm 

Who published this? http://comminfo.rutgers.edu/~sroczyns/wedding.html Who published this? 

What's the ~ ? http://www.renaissance-weddings.net/  Who published this?  What's up with the .net CITATION

MLA

Consider the source  HERE Citation Machine   and my new favorite EASYBIB  http://www.easybib.com/

 

Researched and organized project is worth 50%  Properly formatted works cited page according to the MLA is worth 50%      

Consider but do not limit yourself to the following:

Betrothal / Engagement / Promise / Parents Permission Wedding Customs - Arranged Marriages and Contracts / Wedding Customs /  The Age of Consent / Union of souls/ Religious Considerations /The Dowry / Gifts / Parents Wedding Contracts / Handfast marriages / Wedding Reception & Food / The Wedding Dresses / Clothing / Rings /  Reception / Entertainment / COST?/ The importance of marriage to an Elizabethan woman /....

28

FRIDAY

 Friday, Feb 28, 2014  Comp Lab 1211  Project and Motivational Speech

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34

WEEK FOUR

 

March 3

MONDAY

 

View the science of persuasion

 

Killer Presentation Skills

 

Pamela Meyer: How to spot a liar (avoid these behaviors in your speech???)

 

Call to action and your speech

How can you use these in your speech?

Complete Motivational Speech and Transfer to index card.    

 

The Skill of Self Confidence: Dr. Ivan Joseph at TEDxRyersonU

Persuasive Speeches

 

4

TUESDAY

 

Complete final preparations in your exploration of the following essential question:  

 How do I effectively communicate to a variety of audiences for distinct purposes?

What does it mean to think critically?  

What does it mean to listen critically?

 

 

1  COMPLETE YOUR WRITTEN COPY TO TURN IN SHOW ME & THEN TRANSFER TO INDEX CARDS. 

2  NO ONE WILL BE ABLE TO PRESENT WITHOUT THESE TWO THINGS COMPLETED.

3  IF YOU WILL NOT PRESENT-- YOU MUST WRITE OUT THE SPEECH IN LONGHAND-- ONE PARAGRAPH PER STEP (MAXIMUM SCORE IS AN 80%).

4  DONE? WORK WITH A PARTNER TO ACTUALLY GO THROUGH YOUR PRESENTATION IN ORDER TO ... avoid rookie mistakes.

 

 

 

 

 

Avoid rookie mistakes & further refine vocal variety and eye contact.

 

E eyes

V oice

BB body language

P osture

 

 

We will study, create and deliver a motivational speech using Monroe's Motivational Sequence.

MONROE’S MOTIVATED SEQUENCE--THE FIVE STEPS
STEP
FUNCTION
IDEAL AUDIENCE RESPONSE
Attention to get audience to listen "I want to hear what you have to say"
Need to get audience to feel a need or want "I agree. I have that need/want
Satisfaction to tell audience how to fill need or want "I see your solution will work"
Visualization to get audience to see benefits of solution "This is a great idea"
Action to get audience to take action "I want it"

See HERE for additonal information.

Your grade is based on the following:

You must address all five steps effectively and in writing on notecards (see me) according to MONROE’S MOTIVATED SEQUENCE and turn in a second copy of your planned speech on paper before Monday March 10th. 5 HW assignments.

You must be prepared to speak and listen every day (until you have spoken)  The Week's Participation Grade.

No Freaking Speaking: Managing Public Speaking Anxiety

Create, organize, and utilize note cards for note card delivery of a speech

Apply basic note-taking skills to make it easier to locate needed information on the cards while minimizing the time spent looking down. (Note card guidelines: there should be more white space than ink on cards,  indent, utilize outline form, skip lines, use highlighters, use symbols, don’t write on back of cards, number cards,  write larger than usual.)

The number of note cards required is typically up to the speaker, but generally, the rule of thumb is:  too many cards results in too much looking down and not enough connecting with the audience, while too few note cards results in too much looking  to the back upper right wall or too much looking up into the brain to find what to say, with the same end result of poor eye contact and audience connection.  

Perform appropriate pre-speaking routine & recall the importance of posture  (AMY CUDDY)

Stretch jaw by yawning- (To help encourage proper articulation)

Assume military posture, then relax a little- (to stand correctly at podium, and to help them avoid weight shifting, rocking, and podium leaning)

Breathe deeply- (to limit anxiety and to aid in appropriate voice projection and tone)

Deliver a speech using appropriate eye contact and vocal variety. 

FOCUS-- Avoiding rookie mistakes & further refinement of vocal variety and eye contact  

                                              

 

Content -Vocal variety: 

RATE:

(1st) Students will speak at an appropriate rate by avoiding common rookie mistake of rushing their words.

(2nd) Students will vary rate for effect.

PITCH:  (1st) Students will demonstrate appropriate pitch changes by avoiding common rookie mistake of speaking in monotone.

(2nd)  Students will vary pitch for effect.

Volume:  (1st) Students will project their voice appropriately by avoiding common rookie mistake of not speaking to the back row. 

(2nd)  Students will vary volume for effect.

ARTICULATION:

(2nd)  Students will properly articulate their words by opening mouth appropriately for vowels and exploding the consonants and avoiding the common rookie mistake of mumbling.

                                                Content- Eye Contact

(1st) Students will establish appropriate eye contact by avoiding common rookie mistake of looking down more than looking up.

(2nd)  Students will use eye contact to develop a connection with their audience (look around room naturally, try to establish individual eye contact with as many audience members as possible,  try not to cut off the corners of the room, try not to stare at one person, try not to look over heads of audience members at back right wall, try not  to look up into their own heads for words they can’t recall, try not to get lost in note cards, try to look down at cards by lowering eyes and not head.)

Audience Role

The audience will be expected to maintain a response journal (page)  in which they evaluate/critique each speaker.  

They will also provide immediate and invaluable feedback for speaker at the conclusion of each speech. 

Both the journal and the positive contributions to whole class follow-up discussions will be evaluated by the teacher.

 

 

 

 

5

WEDNESDAY

 Wednesday, Mar 5, 2014  Comp Lab 1211

Third Quarter Project Due Monday March 24th

Research for comparison wedding customs and related issues between Shakespeare's' world and ours in order to better understand the essential question:


“What is essential to a successful relationship as revealed in
Much Ado About Nothing?”

6

THURSDAY

 Thursday, Mar 6, 2014   Comp Lab 2118

Third Quarter Project Due Monday March 24th

Research for comparison wedding customs and related issues between Shakespeare's' world and ours in order to better understand the essential question:

“What is essential to a successful relationship as revealed in Much Ado About Nothing?”

7

FRIDAY

 

View excerpts of The Persuaders   Chapters 4 and 5  

COMPLETE THE WORKSHEET THAT GOES ALONG WITH THE EXCERPTS 

 

 

BACK TO TOP

35

WEEK FIVE

 

10

MONDAY

 Deliver a motivational speech using Monroe's Motivational Sequence.

Audience Role

The audience will be expected to maintain a response journal (page)  in which they evaluate/critique each speaker.  

They will also provide immediate and invaluable feedback for speaker at the conclusion of each speech. 

Both the journal and the positive contributions to whole class follow-up discussions will be evaluated by the teacher.

Speaker's Responsibilities  

E eyes  20%

V oice  20%

B(yours) B (audience) body language  20%

P osture 20%

Prepared with five index cards and speech outline 20%

11

TUESDAY

 

E eyes

V oice

B(yours) B (audience) body language

P osture

BRING I.D. (and older books) to pick up 1984

12

WEDNESDAY

 To Library for 1984 

An introduction to ...

WAR IS PEACE

 

FREEDOM IS SLAVERY

 

IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH

SECRET DIARY DISTRIBUTED IN CLASS   (here)

What can we deduce from the excerpts of text on page three that describe a world in the future?  Work with a partner and write one prediction or question for each quote or excerpt below for discussion.

Begin reading together.

Be prepared to turn in your secret diary at any time.

 

13

THURSDAY

Discussion of essential questions and reading.

Essential questions (see page two of secret diary) we will explore using George Orwell’ s 1984 :

 KEEP IN MIND THAT THE KEY TO EXPLORATION OF ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS IS ADMITTING YOU MAY BE ABLE TO LEARN MORE THAN YOUR CURRENT "FEELING"  OR  "BELIEF" WITHOUT EVIDENCE BASED CLAIMS.

  

 

Unpacking and establishing supporting questions for the essential questions. 

 

 

1.     What do we think an “ideal” society would be? What kind of future society are we creating through our actions, policies and ideologies of today?    

 

2.    How does perspective shape or alter truth?  

 

3.    In what ways do media construct reality?    

 

4.    What role does an individual have in society?

  

5.    How is propaganda used in society throughout history? In current events?    

 

6.    How is Orwell’s fictional view of 1984 reflected in our reality of today?

 

 

READING

 

 

 

14

FRIDAY

 

QUESTIONS/ACTIVITIES—PART ONE

Keep track of a news program (article) for three days and keep a journal/list of all of the stories that cause fear or warn people about the world and of all of the stories that are positive and neutral.  With EBC (Evidence Based Claims) be sure to cite the date time and source used for your observations.

 

Let's do one together. Use PAGE THREE  (3) OF DIARY

Select a source:

Possible sources below for analysis  or pick your own.

http://www.foxnews.com/        http://www.msnbc.com/       http://www.nbcnews.com/   http://www.pbs.org/newshour/

http://www.cnn.com/       http://www.cbsnews.com/       http://www.usnews.com/   

http://abcnews.go.com/US/      http://www.reuters.com/news/us    http://www.npr.org/sections/news/

http://www.bbc.com/news/    http://www.aljazeera.com/watch_now/   http://rt.com/news/

http://www.nytimes.com/

READ as assigned.

BACK TO TOP

36

 

WEEK SIX

 

17

MONDAY

Discussion of essential questions and reading.

Essential questions (see page two of secret diary) we will explore using George Orwell’ s 1984 :

 KEEP IN MIND THAT THE KEY TO EXPLORATION OF ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS IS ADMITTING YOU MAY BE ABLE TO LEARN MORE THAN YOUR CURRENT "FEELING"  OR  "BELIEF" WITHOUT EVIDENCE BASED CLAIMS.

  

 

Unpacking and establishing supporting questions for the essential questions. 

 

 

1.     What do we think an “ideal” society would be? What kind of future society are we creating through our actions, policies and ideologies of today?    

 

2.    How does perspective shape or alter truth?  

 

3.    In what ways do media construct reality?    

 

4.    What role does an individual have in society?

  

5.    How is propaganda used in society throughout history? In current events?    

 

6.    How is Orwell’s fictional view of 1984 reflected in our reality of today?

 

 

READING

 

 

 

18

TUESDAY

How is Orwell’s fictional view of 1984 reflected in our reality of today?

 

 

 

QUESTIONS/ACTIVITIES—PART ONE

Keep track of a news program (article) for three days and keep a journal/list of all of the stories that cause fear or warn people about the world and of all of the stories that are positive and neutral.  With EBC (Evidence Based Claims) be sure to cite the date time and source used for your observations. Counts as 3 HW assignments due Friday.

 

Let's do one together. Use PAGE THREE  (3) OF DIARY

Select a source:

Possible sources below for analysis  or pick your own.

http://www.foxnews.com/        http://www.msnbc.com/       http://www.nbcnews.com/   http://www.pbs.org/newshour/

http://www.cnn.com/       http://www.cbsnews.com/       http://www.usnews.com/   

http://abcnews.go.com/US/      http://www.reuters.com/news/us    http://www.npr.org/sections/news/

http://www.bbc.com/news/    http://www.aljazeera.com/watch_now/   http://rt.com/news/

http://www.nytimes.com/

READ as assigned.

19

WEDNESDAY

 How is Orwell’s fictional view of 1984 reflected in our reality of today?

READING and work on essential questions/secret diary.

NEWSPEAK DISCUSSION

20

THURSDAY

 

 

How is Orwell’s fictional view of 1984 reflected in our reality of today?

READING and work on essential questions/secret diary.

"LOVE AS REBELLION"

Begin Reading Book II Chapter 5

21

FRIDAY

How is Orwell’s fictional view of 1984 reflected in our reality of today?

Discuss/ respond to your news analysis assignment and turn in pages 4 and 5.

"LOVE AS REBELLION"

Continue Reading Book II Chapter 5

Complete through start of Book III for Monday

READING and work on essential questions/secret diary.

BACK TO TOP

37

WEEK SEVEN

 

24

MONDAY

 Per 3 and 4    1102

 

 

THIRD QUARTER PROJECT IS DUE FRIDAY

 

 

 

 

Select one aspect of Orwell's 1984 to research and write a 1-2 page essay* about incorporating EBC  (Evidence Based Claims).

Be sure to include at least two reputable sources for your essay due on Monday the 31st (counts as three HW assignments).

Working in computer lab on task= 33%

Essay format and on time= 33%

Properly formatted citations =34%

Read some of this--   1984 TODAY? or BIOMETRICS?

  1. Someone’s watching Granny cook her eggs. A new video surveillance system watches over senior citizens, monitoring everything from when they get out of bed to whether their eggs are fully cooked.
     
  2. Aunt Martha’s been in the bathroom for 30 minutes. Motion sensors track senior citizens around their homes, sending text messages to family when a possible problem arises. RFID chips track medicine and the inventory in kitchen cabinets.
     
  3. The scanner says you missed class today. Students must flash an ID card near the university lecture hall entrance to register their class attendance. The resulting information feeds into class participation grades.
     
  4. Alert! Preschooler has left the building! Thanks to a radio frequency tag in special basketball jersey-type shirts preschoolers wear, teachers and administrators can quickly tell when a student wanders off campus. The system tracks students at recess, in the cafeteria, and even in the bathroom.
     
  5. Why is Will still on the school bus? RFID chips and barcodes on student and faculty IDs and various pieces of equipment will allow a high school to track where people and things are at all times if funding is awarded. If someone’s missing or out of place, they can take action immediately.
     
  6. Your recycling bin may tattle on you if you throw away too many plastic bottles or cardboard boxes. In Cleveland, Ohio, RFID chips and barcodes will tell garbage collectors how often you put out the recycling. If it’s not often enough, your trash will be searched and you can be fined $100 if recyclables are found.

Possible topics include but are not limited to the following:

Photo /  History manipulation

Textbook adoption

banned books

privacy rights

corporate rights

news

government bureaucracy

corporate invasion of privacy

free speech

thought crime

newspeak

1984 in contemporary entertainment

fascism / totalitarianism

propaganda

Russia and the Ukraine  ( what is Putin saying?)

drug testing

telescreens

cellphones

clothing / status

Social / political structure

Map of the world

Prediction or Fiction?

George Orwell

Computers and you

Amazon

The Memory Hole

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

* A 1-2 page essay is the primary option; however, you may propose an equally rigorous research project that must be in writing and approved by me.

 

 

 

 

 

 

25

TUESDAY

Per 3 and 4   1211


1984 assignment




26

WEDNESDAY

 Per 3 and 4   1211

1984 assignment

27

THURSDAY

 

THIRD QUARTER PROJECT IS DUE FRIDAY

1.     What do we think an “ideal” society would be? What kind of future society are we creating through our actions, policies and ideologies of today?    

 

2.    How does perspective shape or alter truth?  

 

3.    In what ways do media construct reality?    

 

4.    What role does an individual have in society?

  

5.    How is propaganda used in society throughout history? In current events?    

 

6.    How is Orwell’s fictional view of 1984 reflected in our reality of today?

 

 

1984

Discussion/ reading Book III

28

FRIDAY

 

THIRD QUARTER PROJECT IS DUE

 

1.     What do we think an “ideal” society would be? What kind of future society are we creating through our actions, policies and ideologies of today?    

 

2.    How does perspective shape or alter truth?  

 

3.    In what ways do media construct reality?    

 

4.    What role does an individual have in society?

  

5.    How is propaganda used in society throughout history? In current events?    

 

6.    How is Orwell’s fictional view of 1984 reflected in our reality of today?

 

Project Due

Discussion/ reading Book III

HW Research with citation due Monday.

BACK TO TOP

38

WEEK EIGHT

 

 31

MONDAY

 

Project PAST due.    1984  research assignment with citation due.  Quiz on Book III Chapter 1 is due.

Discussion/ reading Book III  Complete

 

APRIL 1

TUESDAY

 

 

Discussion/ reading Book III

.

2

WEDNESDAY

 

View / discuss end of 1984 .

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

1.     What do we think an “ideal” society would be? What kind of future society are we creating through our actions, policies and ideologies of today?    

 

2.    How does perspective shape or alter truth?  

 

3.    In what ways do media construct reality?    

 

4.    What role does an individual have in society?

  

5.    How is propaganda used in society throughout history? In current events?    

 

6.    How is Orwell’s fictional view of 1984 reflected in our reality of today?

 

 

 

Why Orwell wrote 1984....

Journalism and Journalistic Writing

Dystopia Response to media excerpts.

3

THURSDAY

 

 

 

Why Orwell wrote 1984....  HERE

  

 

What is that "THX " sound at the start of movies????    

The THX sound standard was created by George Lucas, Tomlinson Holman, and Skywalker Sound — an innovation that changed the movie theater audio experience.

 

THX 1138  EXCERPTS   Compare and contrast with 1984.   Venn diagram is ok due Friday (for extra credit as the quarter ends) Monday at the latest.

"Work hard, increase production, prevent accidents, and be happy." THX 1138, George Lucas' directorial debut, presents a cold, dystopian future in which individual thought and love are forbidden. But two citizens dare to rebel.

LUH 3417, a disenchanted surveillance worker, consciously stops taking her mandatory drugs — medication that suppresses emotions — and gives placebos to her roommate, THX 1138. Now free to feel, the two fall in love, but find themselves on the run for breaking laws of conformity.

Released March 11, 1971

 

Dystopia Response to Media

4

FRIDAY

Why Orwell wrote 1984....  HERE

Journalism and Journalistic Writing  

What is that "THX " sound at the start of movies????    

The THX sound standard was created by George Lucas, Tomlinson Holman, and Skywalker Sound — an innovation that changed the movie theater audio experience.

 

THX 1138  EXCERPTS   Compare and contrast with 1984.   Venn diagram is ok due Friday (for extra credit as the quarter ends) Monday at the latest.

"Work hard, increase production, prevent accidents, and be happy." THX 1138, George Lucas' directorial debut, presents a cold, dystopian future in which individual thought and love are forbidden. But two citizens dare to rebel.

LUH 3417, a disenchanted surveillance worker, consciously stops taking her mandatory drugs — medication that suppresses emotions — and gives placebos to her roommate, THX 1138. Now free to feel, the two fall in love, but find themselves on the run for breaking laws of conformity.

Released March 11, 1971

 

Dystopia Response to Media

 End of Third Marking Period

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39

 

 

 

 

FOURTH QUARTER:

 41

 

 

WEEK ONE

7

MONDAY

As you begin the final quarter of your HS year we will work on a highly personal:

 Senior Memory Book Assignment

We will  answer the following essential and focus questions:

Essential

What is the value of self-reflection in preparing for one’s future?

Focus Questions

How do we define identity?

What are ways that identity is revealed?

Why is it important to have a clear identity?

How are personalities defined?

How can knowing about various personality traits improve relationships?

How do stereotypes affect identity and personality?

How do external factors affect one’s sense of identity?

It might even be nice to have people sign it on your graduation day!

 

 AIR PROJECT  TO LIBRARY FRIDAY FOR BOOK SELECTION

8

TUESDAY

 

Debate Prezzi

INTRODUCTION TO DEBATE

BRAINSTORMING in pairs  5 possible topics.

9

WEDNESDAY

 DEBATE PREP/Project

Debate Prezzi

Monroe's Motivational Sequence.

MONROE’S MOTIVATED SEQUENCE--THE FIVE STEPS
STEP
FUNCTION
IDEAL AUDIENCE RESPONSE
Attention to get audience to listen "I want to hear what you have to say"
Need to get audience to feel a need or want "I agree. I have that need/want
Satisfaction to tell audience how to fill need or want "I see your solution will work"
Visualization to get audience to see benefits of solution "This is a great idea"
Action to get audience to take action "I want it"







10

THURSDAY

 DEBATE PREP/ Project

Debate Prezzi

Comedy Debates

Intelligence Squared Debates

The Art of Debate: Never Lose An Argument Again

All of this in 5min!

Three main parts of any debate:

1 Claim (thesis - affirmative construction)

2 Warrant  (evidence EBC)

3 Impact (why it matters)

"the Burden of Rejoinder"   -- cross-examination??

Debate Judo

Listening

Think Fast

Read the Judge (audience)

 

 

 

11

FRIDAY

AIR   Select book for Library

 

 

4th Quarter Project

 

Accountable Independent Reading

 

10% Explain how your project will help you improve your skills in one area or for college as part of your proposal (Due May 2nd).

Incorporate Evidence Based Claims -- with MLA citation.   Try using  EASYBIB or Citation Machine

20% Detailed proposal with detailed rubric for scoring your project based on your proposal attached to your project (a second copy) due May 2nd (Due May 2nd).

STUDENT generated Project Ideas WITH EBC: Here

50% Your self-designed project (Due May 25th)

20% MLA Formatted Citation Page (Due May 25th)




As you are working on this independent project, keep in mind we will be covering other material in class!

Done?  Type up your proposal for Accountable Independent Reading  (Self-select text to respond and develop innovative perspectives. Establish and use criteria to classify, select, and evaluate texts to make informed judgments about the quality of the pieces). 

 

14 MONDAY

15 TUESDAY Spring Recess Begins

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42

 

WEEK TWO

 

21

MONDAY

 38 class days remaining!

Essential Question

What is the value of self-reflection in preparing for one’s future?

Focus Questions

How do we define identity?

What are ways that identity is revealed?

Why is it important to have a clear identity?

How are personalities defined?

How do external factors affect one’s sense of identity?

Prepare your debate your notes are due at the start of class Tuesday.  I will hold these notes and will give them back to you on the day of your debate.  If you wish to have a copy of your notes, have this done before Tuesday.  Debate begin Tuesday!

DEBATE PREP/ Project

Debate Prezzi

Comedy Debates

Intelligence Squared Debates

The Art of Debate: Never Lose An Argument Again

All of this in 5min!

Three main parts of any debate:

1 Claim (thesis - affirmative construction)

2 Warrant  (evidence EBC)

3 Impact (why it matters)

"the Burden of Rejoinder"   -- cross-examination??

Debate Judo

Listening

Think Fast

Read the Judge (audience)

 

 Senior Memory Book

Weighted / Worth 10 HW Grades!

 

22

TUESDAY

 37 school days remain

Your debate notes are due at the start of class today.  I will hold these notes and will give them back to you when it is your turn to debate.  If you wish to have a copy of your notes, have this done before.  Debates begin!

Audience Participation--  Daily HW assignment--

Identify participants, positions, and rejoinder.

 

1 Claim (thesis - affirmative / negative construction)

2 Warrant  (evidence EBC)

3 Impact (why it matters)

 

23

WEDNESDAY

 36

DEBATE

Audience Participation--  Daily HW assignment--

Identify participants, positions, and rejoinder.

DEBATE:

1 Claim (thesis - affirmative / negative construction)

2 Warrant  (evidence EBC)

3 Impact (why it matters)

24

THURSDAY

 35

DEBATE

Audience Participation--  Daily HW assignment--

Identify participants, positions, and rejoinder.

DEBATE:

1 Claim (thesis - affirmative / negative construction)

2 Warrant  (evidence EBC)

3 Impact (why it matters)

25

FRIDAY

 34

 

Audience Participation--  Daily HW assignment--

Identify participants, positions, and rejoinder.

DEBATE:

1 Claim (thesis - affirmative / negative construction)

2 Warrant  (evidence EBC)

3 Impact (why it matters)

 

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43

WEEK THREE

 

28

MONDAY

Monday, Apr 28, 2014 meet in lab 1102

Controversial Debate Topic Selection & Research is weighted / worth as three notebook test grades.

(Topics must be approved if not on this list.)

If you can not find a person to debate, see me immediately.  I will assign topics, positions and teams as needed.

What is due by Monday the 5th?

Your construction based on the affirmative statement.

A  minimum of three authoritative sources on a works cited page according to MLA format.

 


1 Claim (thesis - affirmative / negative construction)

2 Warrant  (evidence EBC-  You must be able to cite a minimum of three authoritative sources according to MLA format and be able to explain why they are authoritative at your debate)

3 Impact (why it matters)

DONE??? Senior Memory Book

Weighted / Worth 10 HW Grades!

33

29

TUESDAY

Tuesday, Apr 29, 2014

meet in 1211

AIR Proposal

 

Controversial Debate Topic Selection & Research is weighted / worth as three notebook test grades.

(Topics must be approved if not on this list.)

If you can not find a person to debate, see me immediately.  I will assign topics, positions and teams as needed.

What is due by Monday the 5th?

Your construction based on the affirmative statement.

A  minimum of three authoritative sources on a works cited page according to MLA format.

 


1 Claim (thesis - affirmative / negative construction)

2 Warrant  (evidence EBC-  You must be able to cite a minimum of three authoritative sources according to MLA format and be able to explain why they are authoritative at your debate)

3 Impact (why it matters)

DONE??? Senior Memory Book

Weighted / Worth 10 HW Grades!

32

30

WEDNESDAY

Wednesday, Apr 30, 2014

meet in 1102

AIR  Proposal due by Friday

20% of the project grade is a detailed proposal AND detailed Rubric for scoring your project (a second copy ) attached to your project.

#1 How long you have to read the text and how long it will take you to read the text (take the number of pages you read in 10minutes and determine how many minutes it will take to read based on the number of pages).  DETERMINE WHEN YOU SELECT AND HAVE APPROVAL FOR THE TEXT.

#2 What skill would you like to focus on-- on grade level  here ?  All work proposed MUST have Evidence Based Claims as part of the final project as well as a rubric on the scale of 1-20.

#3 CONSIDER-- What steps will you need to take to complete the published product for your project?  Will you have to take notes as you read?  Will you need to keep a journal with page # citation?  How long to create that video?   How many drafts (from brainstorming to final draft) will you write and include in your final project?  Will you finally learn how to cite and complete an awesome Works Cited page????  What steps in the writing process will you focus on???

#4 What will you need to accomplish in order to complete the required writing and book talk?  YOU MUST BRING THE TEXT EVERY DAY!  SHOW ME!


Student Brainstorm Project Ideas to share with the class and we discuss how to ensure EBC are incorporated:


As you are working on this independent project, keep in mind we will be covering other material in class!

MAY 1

THURSDAY

 Continue Debates--

 

30

REMINDER

4th Quarter Project

 

Accountable Independent Reading

 

10% Explain how your project will help you improve your skills in one area or for college as part of your proposal (Due May 2nd).

Incorporate Evidence Based Claims -- with MLA citation.   Try using  EASYBIB or Citation Machine

20% Detailed proposal with detailed rubric for scoring your project based on your proposal attached to your project (a second copy) due May 2nd (Due May 2nd).

STUDENT generated Project Ideas WITH EBC: Here

50% Your self-designed project (Due June 9th)

20% MLA Formatted Citation Page (Due June 9th)

 

Senior Memory Book

Weighted / Worth 10 HW Grades!

2

FRIDAY

 29

Continue Debates--

REMINDER

4th Quarter Project

 

Accountable Independent Reading

 

10% Explain how your project will help you improve your skills in one area or for college as part of your proposal (Due May 2nd).

Incorporate Evidence Based Claims -- with MLA citation.   Try using  EASYBIB or Citation Machine

20% Detailed proposal with detailed rubric for scoring your project based on your proposal attached to your project (a second copy) due May 2nd (Due May 2nd).

STUDENT generated Project Ideas WITH EBC: Here

50% Your self-designed project (Due May 25th)

20% MLA Formatted Citation Page (Due May 25th)

 

Senior Memory Book

Weighted / Worth 10 HW Grades!

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44

 WEEK FOUR

INTERIM REPORTS  (Due in last Friday)

5

MONDAY

 28 

Both the "Proposal" for the Accountable Independent Reading Project as well as the Controversial Debate Construction are due.

 

Answering the questions:

What does it mean to think and listen critically?

 

What does effective communication look like?

 

What techniques do speakers use to get an audience to agree or understand?

 

6

TUESDAY

 27

Answering the questions:

What does it mean to think and listen critically?

 

What does effective communication look like?

 

What techniques do speakers use to get an audience to agree or understand?

 

Excerpts from The Great Debaters.

7

WEDNESDAY

 26

Complete at least two of the Senior Memory Book assignments This is due in 17 class days (Monday June2nd)

 

OR

 

You may work on you Accountable Independent Reading Project  This is due in 22 class days (Monday June9th)

8

THURSDAY

 25

Answering the questions:

What does it mean to think and listen critically?

 

What does effective communication look like?

 

What techniques do speakers use to get an audience to agree or understand?

 

Excerpts from The Great Debaters.

9

FRIDAY

 24

Your Choice--

AIR Reading Day   /    Quietly Work on your Senior Memory Book

 

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45

WEEK FIVE

 

12

MONDAY

 23

 

 

FOUR MONDAY’S REMAINING IN YOUR SENIOR YEAR.  YOU CAN COUNT THEM ON ONE HAND!

Work on your Senior Memory Book assignments.

BE SURE TO HAVE A HARD COPY OF YOUR CONSTRUCTION AT THE START OF CLASS TUESDAY!

 

13

TUESDAY

 22

CONTROVERSIAL DEBATE!

 

14

WEDNESDAY

 21 CONTROVERSIAL DEBATE!

15

THURSDAY

 20 CONTROVERSIAL DEBATE!

16

FRIDAY

 19CONTROVERSIAL DEBATE!

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46

 

WEEK SIX

 

19

MONDAY

 18 CONTROVERSIAL DEBATE!

20

TUESDAY

 17 CONTROVERSIAL DEBATE!

21

WEDNESDAY

 16 The Anti Hero

22

THURSDAY

 15 The Anti Hero

23

FRIDAY

 14 Make up work day!   Work on   Senior Memory Book or AIR project

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47

WEEK SEVEN

 

26 Shool Closed

MONDAY

 

27

TUESDAY

 13

The Anti Hero   Complete worksheet with evidence.

          28

WEDNESDAY

 12

Last Chance CONTROVERSIAL DEBATES! / Alternative assignment.

PROJECT AND SENIOR MEMORY BOOK DUE Monday the 9th

29

THURSDAY

 11

 

The Heroine and  Anti Heroine in history  (besides Catwoman).

Work on character analysis for your assigned character.  Be ready to share with the class.

PROJECT AND SENIOR MEMORY BOOK DUE Monday the 9th

30

FRIDAY

 10

The Heroine and  Anti Heroine in history  (besides Catwoman).

Work on character analysis for your assigned character.  Be ready to share with the class.

PROJECT AND SENIOR MEMORY BOOK DUE Monday the 9th

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48

WEEK EIGHT

 

June  2

MONDAY

 9 The Heroine and  Anti Heroine in history  (besides Catwoman).

Work on character analysis for your assigned character.  Be ready to share with the class.

PROJECT AND SENIOR MEMORY BOOK DUE Monday the 9th

DO NOT E-MAIL WORK TO ME!

ALL LATE WORK IS DUE BY YOUR CLASS PERIOD THIS FRIDAY.

3

TUESDAY

 8  Computer Lab PROJECT AND SENIOR MEMORY BOOK DUE Monday the 9th

Senior Memory Book   Weighted / Worth 10 HW Grades!

REMINDER

4th Quarter Project

 

Accountable Independent Reading

 

10% Explain how your project will help you improve your skills in one area or for college as part of your proposal (Due May 2nd).

Incorporate Evidence Based Claims -- with MLA citation.   Try using  EASYBIB or Citation Machine

20% Detailed proposal with detailed rubric for scoring your project based on your proposal attached to your project (a second copy) due May 2nd (Due May 2nd).

STUDENT generated Project Ideas WITH EBC: Here

50% Your self-designed project (Due June 9th)

20% MLA Formatted Citation Page (Due June 9th)

DO NOT E-MAIL WORK TO ME!

ALL LATE WORK IS DUE BY YOUR CLASS PERIOD THIS FRIDAY.

 

4

WEDNESDAY

 7 PROJECT AND SENIOR MEMORY BOOK DUE Monday the 9th

DO NOT E-MAIL WORK TO ME!

ALL LATE WORK IS DUE BY YOUR CLASS PERIOD THIS FRIDAY.

5

THURSDAY

 6 Computer Lab PROJECT AND SENIOR MEMORY BOOK DUE Monday the 9th

Senior Memory Book

REMINDER

4th Quarter Project

 

Accountable Independent Reading

 

10% Explain how your project will help you improve your skills in one area or for college as part of your proposal (Due May 2nd).

Incorporate Evidence Based Claims -- with MLA citation.   Try using  EASYBIB or Citation Machine

20% Detailed proposal with detailed rubric for scoring your project based on your proposal attached to your project (a second copy) due May 2nd (Due May 2nd).

STUDENT generated Project Ideas WITH EBC: Here

50% Your self-designed project (Due June 9th)

20% MLA Formatted Citation Page (Due June 9th)

DO NOT E-MAIL WORK TO ME!

ALL LATE WORK IS DUE BY YOUR CLASS PERIOD THIS FRIDAY.

 

6

FRIDAY

 5 Computer Lab PROJECT AND SENIOR MEMORY BOOK DUE Monday the 9th

PROM  ise to be safe!

Senior Memory Book

REMINDER

4th Quarter Project

 

Accountable Independent Reading

 

10% Explain how your project will help you improve your skills in one area or for college as part of your proposal (Due May 2nd).

Incorporate Evidence Based Claims -- with MLA citation.   Try using  EASYBIB or Citation Machine

20% Detailed proposal with detailed rubric for scoring your project based on your proposal attached to your project (a second copy) due May 2nd (Due May 2nd).

STUDENT generated Project Ideas WITH EBC: Here

50% Your self-designed project (Due June 9th)

20% MLA Formatted Citation Page (Due June 9th)

DO NOT E-MAIL WORK TO ME!

ALL LATE WORK IS DUE BY YOUR CLASS PERIOD NOW.

 

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49

WEEK NINE

 

9

MONDAY

 4  PROJECT AND SENIOR MEMORY BOOK DUE

10

TUESDAY

 3

11

WEDNESDAY

 2  

FINAL EXAM

If you miss two days of the final exam you are responsible to arrange for a legitimate note excusing you and to attend the school wide make up day during testing week.

12

THURSDAY

1

FINAL EXAM

If you miss two days of the final exam you are responsible to arrange for a legitimate note excusing you and to attend the school wide make up day during testing week.

13

FRIDAY

0!

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410

WEEK TEN

 

16

MONDAY

 

17

TUESDAY

 

18

WEDNESDAY

 

19

THURSDAY

 

20

FRIDAY

 

 

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411

 

 

23

MONDAY

 

24

TUESDAY

 

25

WEDNESDAY

 

26 LAST DAY

THURSDAY

 

 27

FRIDAY

Conference Day